Beginner resources needed

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With so much conflicting information out there im hoping someone can point me in a good direction. I'm going to get into drumming for my church and have so many basic questions. Is there a website or resource that offers good advice and answers for basic questions?
Some sites say beginner kits are good, others say they are crap. Some say get a Pearl $500 kit, others say spend the money and get an intermediate kit for $750. Some sites say Drummeo is good for beginner lessons online, others say save the money and look into free youtube lessons.

Im so lost...

Really sorry for the beginner "help me' thread!

edit: I should mention I live in a very rural area. In person lessons are near impossible and buying used will be challenging.
 

Cpb282

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My 2 cents. Take it with a large grain of salt as I came from a horns background.

I think that it largely depends on what you’re trying to accomplish. My teenage daughter, the drummer of the family, decided that she doesn’t want music to be her profession. She just likes playing with her siblings and the occasional friend band.

She took a year of in-person drum lessons and since then has taken group lessons with her siblings from a “guitar”teacher. The past year fully virtual.

She doesn’t YouTube, she just breaks the songs down into parts and figures it out herself by listening. I’m sure that she does lots technically wrong. But she’s having a blast doing it.

Then there’s the other side of the spectrum of folks that are really serious about it.

In either event, I think that you can get a lot out of virtual lessons if you’re serious about it and set up a camera so that the instructor can see what you’re doing. I’d avoid relying solely on YouTube as human interaction is meaningful.
 

Cpb282

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Oh, and re kits, we’re still learning, but you can get awesome used kits (shells only) for $500-$700.
 

mattmalloy66

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First off, welcome to the forum.
Second, you have come to a good place for advice from a wide variety of drummers. We have new drummers, we have professional drummers, and everything in between, but lot's of knowledge and opinions.
No need to spend too much, as many newer kits like Yamaha Stage Customs are in the price range you mentioned, and are great drums.
You will spend about $1000 on any good 4-5 piece drum set, with cymbals and stands. About $1500 if buying all new.
That's not a lot of money considering you get a lot of instruments.
Used gear is cheaper, and high level drums cost more, but you have to know what your'e looking at to determine if it's really a good price.
 

DanRH

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First off, welcome to the forum.
Second, you have come to a good place for advice from a wide variety of drummers. We have new drummers, we have professional drummers, and everything in between, but lot's of knowledge and opinions.
No need to spend too much, as many newer kits like Yamaha Stage Customs are in the price range you mentioned, and are great drums.
You will spend about $1000 on any good 4-5 piece drum set, with cymbals and stands. About $1500 if buying all new.
That's not a lot of money considering you get a lot of instruments.
Used gear is cheaper, and high level drums cost more, but you have to know what your'e looking at to determine if it's really a good price.
Totally agree with his suggestions.
 

6topher

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Here's a good middle of the road solution for someone in your position.

You can find good shell packs for cheap,but hardware & cymbals will be more than the kit. If you take to drumming you can upgrade down the road, but for under $700 you get everything & it's pretty good quality & value for someone starting out at ground zero.
 
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Tornado

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You might be surprised at how far out in to rural areas drum kits drift out to. But also, you can buy used online and have them shipped too. But before you go buy that used shell pack...realize if you don't get hardware with it, it's going to cost you a lot to buy cymbal stands and stuff.
 

JonnyFranchi$e

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Welcome to the forum.

I do a lot of reading here - lots of great knowledge.

DRUMS. IDK just how rural you are, but you can find deals used and you can save a LOT of money used. If you want to share what your budget is we can probably give more specific suggestions about some good options in your range. In general though, I would say get a decent shell pack (just the drums and the mounting hardware for the drums) and then spend more money on good cymbals if you can.

In terms of learning, @Cpb282 is right that you have to start with what your goal is. Do you want to be a really amazing all purpose drummer? Then I would highly recommend starting with snare drum. Learn the rudiments with a good teacher. (IDK about online lessons - I assume it would do much the same as in person but I've never done it - I will say that learning from someone is probably better than watching videos...) I started with Haskell W. Harr's first 2 books on snare drum. They're great. I'm sure there are other great options too.

Difficult to go through all that, but once you have rudiments really down, it helps. I don't practice my rudiments anymore really, but it helped me translate to the full set. I SHOULD practice that stuff more as it always makes me a better set player.

But if you want to just be able to play good basic beats for contemporary worship stuff, my guess is you can learn basic rock drumming and learn how to control your dynamics and tempo. I used Mel Bay's Funk Drumming with Jim Payne. It gets pretty syncopated and challenging but it's great for building versatility and chops into your playing. I bet there are better books and resources out there now but I LOVED that book.

Drumming is a pretty demanding discipline - Being not very good will derail a band faster than anything. Lose the groove and EVERYTHING falls apart. There's a lot riding on the drummer to hold everyone and everything together.

But it's also extremely fun and rewarding. I personally LOVE laying down the groove - holding it together to lay down a good support for the other players and singers. Making everything GROOVY. Drums are a BLAST!

Good luck on your journey!

Question: Do you have any other musical experience (other instruments) or did you play any drums in the past or anything?
 

Stickclick

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I'd look at Pearl Exports or Yamaha Stage Customs drum kits.

Get a mid priced hi hat stand. Don't go cheap on a hi hat stand. The hi hat gets played most of all.

You are in a good web site to find answers. Some forum members may own the gear that you are considering buying and can tell you all about it.

Cymbals are costly. The Zildjian S cymbal pack seems to me to be a decent set of cymbals, they sound good and don't cost a lot.

You can learn from books and free web sites. Find what works for you. Playing along with recordings helps me a lot.
 

langmick

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You shoul figure out what you're going to do, is it just keep time for the guitarist, a 4pc kit with an 18 or 20" BD would suffice, hi-hats and ride/crash would be plenty. Maybe mount a tambourine.

The low-vlume cymbals may also be something that would work, they are pretty darn inexpensive at https://www.drumsupply.com. I'm guessing volume is a concern and you might need a plexiglas drum shield too.

I recommend getting a good metronome app, a practice pad and Stick Control, you can find PDFs on the web, and you need the first page really. That will get you sme stamina and feel for the sticks. Practice 30min each day in front of a mirror watching for stick height and listening for consistency. Make sure your sticks are close in pitch.

When you get your kit, put on Back in Black, careful not to conjure up and demonic spirits, and try to play along. Most of the time I would guess you'll be very low volume with hi-hat/kick/snare and no fills. You could literally get away with only that and everyone would love you for it.

Good luck!
 


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