Best finish for veneer

drumco1547

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I have wrapped a snare in a cool veneer.

What is the best choice for finishing it?

Water or petroleum-based?

I am looking for a bit of a sheen (doesn't need to be super high gloss), and a decent amount of protection.

Any input is greatly appreciated. Will post photos after it dries.

-Will
 

jccabinets

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Can you spray it or does it have to be brushed on?
 

drumco1547

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I don't have a professional spray rig.

I can spray it, but it would have to be from a spray can. (probably not ideal?)
 

jccabinets

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Many people have used spray cans of lacquer with success. You can also achieve a nice finish with a can of varnish or polyurethane and a good quality china bristle brush. If spraying out of a rattle can I think several coats with scuff sanding in between with 320 grit sandpaper. If you brush it then two or three coats should be fine (don't forget to sand between coats).
Ideally, you find a good painter and pay him to spray on a quality finish.
 

jccabinets

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Almost forgot, I like the oil based products but professionals everywhere are turning to water born products and like them. In the long run either would be fine, just follow the manufactures instructions.
 

Woody85

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I've had pretty good luck with oil based wipe on poly. It's p much foolproof and offers a reasonable amount of protection once it cures. It does add some amber colouring though (which may or may not be a good thing).
 

Fat Drummer

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Really, the answer has to start with another question first... what is the backer on the veneer or is it a raw flinch that is glued to the shell? Different backers (raw veneer, paper, wood, phenolic, etc) can be affected by different types of finish depending on the solvent base in the top coat. Do you recall what the backer was AND what type of glue you used to apply it with, that CAN make a difference for the same reasons.

A nice wipe on poly is a safe bet and we've discussed the process of applying that here a couple of times (I can dig it back up if you would like it). It is not very reactive and can be applied by hand with very little chance of issues, but I would still like to hold that recommendation until I knew the backer and glue.

These are all different backed veneers with hand rubbed poly built up to varying degrees of gloss depending on what I was after for that project...


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esooy

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One thing I like to do for getting that nice semi gloss luster is to hand rub the final finish with 0000 steel wool (the finest gradation) and some paste wax (I use Johnson's paste wax, but the can is big and you'll have leftovers for years lol.)

I will concur with above recommendations for using a brush on poly product, sanding between coats. If you find your sandpaper is gumming up, spritz with a little water which will help with that. I like solvent based but as was stated, there are good water based products out there as well. Those water based products have really come a long way from the earlier incarnations.
 

MillerMav

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I have used DEFT lacquer in a spray can in the past and it works really well. Just do maybe 6-8 light passes with about a 20 minute dry time between each. I usually do 3 coats before I start sanding with 0000 steel wool in between each coat. After about 6 coats or so you can sand with 2000-3000 grit sandpaper and then polish with some wax and it really comes out nice. Its just labor intensive this way.
 


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