Best Real Feel, Tunable Elect. Drums

dboomer

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A FSR is a resistor with special properties that changes resistance when you apply pressure and membrane switch is just a plain old switch. And when you measure it it will measure open or closed and never in between. An FSR is always in between.

To measure an FSR you must apply power to it and then connect a pull down resistor. A FSR NEVER has an infinite resistance but a switch ALWAYS does in the open position. They are never interchangeable.

I don’t know what you are looking at but the switches in my Yamaha cymbal pads are 100% switches and 0% FSRs. Same with my Roland rubber pads.

i will grant you that they may look similar.
 
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bpaluzzi

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A FSR is a resistor with special properties that changes resistance when you apply pressure and membrane switch is just a plain old switch. And when you measure it it will measure open or closed and never in between. An FSR is always in between.

To measure an FSR you must apply power to it and then connect a pull down resistor. A FSR NEVER has an infinite resistance but a switch ALWAYS does in the open position. They are never interchangeable.

I don’t know what you are looking at but the switches in my Yamaha cymbal pads are 100% switches and 0% FSRs. Same with my Roland rubber pads.

i will grant you that they may look similar.
You don't have to take my word for it. Here's Mike Snyder from Roland discussing how they introduced the FSR switches on the TDE-7K kit in 1992.

 

dboomer

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OK, I think we have a semantics problem here.

But I think we're getting lost in the weeds here. The FSR pads I was referring to in my post would be like the Aquarian FSR triggers which require running into a specialized FSR interface such as their DITI module. If you were to plug one of those into a Roland interface you'd get nothing.

I suspect we're boring most everyone anyway :)
 

flurbs

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2 inputs from me:

- FSR and Membrane Switches may or may not be the same thing in compnent form, but the two assemblies used in reference to drum triggers are very, very different. Some 'rim' triggering and all 'edge' triggering on cymbal pads are delivered by switches, a basic 'close' informs the module that the sensor has been activated by either a hit (trigger zone) or a press (choke). They are most commonly FSR based membrane switches but other types can be used - I've seen microswitches and direct top-to-bottom contact successfully used. If someone mentions "FSR triggering" then that's usually referring to the Alternate Mode/Mandala setup which is active - two layers of FSR with velocity and position information calculated by a processor, and that's far beyond the 'normal' use of membrane switches.

- For the original poster, Al Adinolfi at Boom Theory makes a product called Spacemuffins, and I believe they will offer you exactly what you are looking for. Good luck!
 

bpaluzzi

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2 inputs from me:

- FSR and Membrane Switches may or may not be the same thing in compnent form, but the two assemblies used in reference to drum triggers are very, very different. Some 'rim' triggering and all 'edge' triggering on cymbal pads are delivered by switches, a basic 'close' informs the module that the sensor has been activated by either a hit (trigger zone) or a press (choke). They are most commonly FSR based membrane switches but other types can be used - I've seen microswitches and direct top-to-bottom contact successfully used. If someone mentions "FSR triggering" then that's usually referring to the Alternate Mode/Mandala setup which is active - two layers of FSR with velocity and position information calculated by a processor, and that's far beyond the 'normal' use of membrane switches.
100% agree that the software interpretation of the output are very, very different, but the tech is the same from a hardware perspective. I used to use Alternate Mode "PoleKat" bar triggers (similar to a Yamaha BP80 / Pintech Dingbat, but it was dual FSR, not piezo) to create "separated" cymbal pads on my 1st generation DTXtreme. Would wire them up via a splitter, with the PoleKat and a standard Yamaha round single-zone TP80 pad. If I hit the TP80 by itself, I'd get one sound, but if I flammed a hit with the TP80 and the PoleKat, I'd trigger the "edge" sound. Could also choke it by grabbing the PoleKat, and that's not something I thought I'd say on a drumming forum ;) Wasn't very practical / useful, but was part of my tinkering phase (that, in all honesty, has continued to this day).

I've never tried the opposite way -- that is, using an FSR-powered edge switch (a la the Yamaha cymbal pads) to try to drive a module that's expecting an FSR pad (like the Alternate mode / Aquarian units). I imagine it would technically "work", but any kind of intelligence in positional sensing would be _totally_ out-of-whack due to the shape of the edge switch.


And totally agree about the Spacemuffins. Have had two of Al's kits over the years and they've both been great. Heavy as heck, though :)
 

dboomer

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Wait ... someone IS interested? ;)

The way you can determine whether you are looking at a switch or at an FSR is to measure the dc resistance. FSRs have a dc resistance of something around 10meg while a switch has infinite resistance because it is open.
 

bpaluzzi

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Wait ... someone IS interested? ;)

The way you can determine whether you are looking at a switch or at an FSR is to measure the dc resistance. FSRs have a dc resistance of something around 10meg while a switch has infinite resistance because it is open.
I'm way out of my league when it comes to the actual electrical engineering specifics and 100% defer to you on that front -- I'm just speaking from a practical / usage standpoint.
 


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