Bitter sweet

Toast Tee

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I don't know how to feel?
I picked up a Yamaha EAD, and although it seems they need to work out some kinks, it's an amazing device. I think Yamaha may have unlocked the future of recording drums. Yamaha may not there just yet, but in a couple of years, the process of recording drums may totally change?
Anyway, I've been working on recording drums in a more traditional fashion these past couple of months (ya know, with mics, a board etc...)
I've been finally getting somewhat comfortable getting my levels right, a good mix with my overheads, and all the stuff it's always taken to get a decent drum sound.
I was looking to make some drum vids, a few covers, and maybe a few "tricks", but I wasn't close to that yet.
So I get this EAD thing, and it sounds really freakin' good! Levels are about perfect, I could add effects with the turn of a non, and have excellent, perfectly matched video in minutes.
I honestly don't know how to feel about this thing?
It's just so much more satisfying the traditional way. It was a sence of accomplishment.
I guess going forward, I'll stick to the more traditional way, on the Tascam model 24, but from what I've been told, I should be able to use them in unison. Well, I got what I wanted, but not sure how I feel about it?
Like the title says, it's bitter sweet.
 

Whitten

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There are too many amazing microphones at unbelievably low prices right now.
The Yamaha is an interesting idea and seems good at what it does. It's definitely not going to replace traditional drum recording IMO.
 

Johnny K

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Very timely post. I watched this guy on YouTube do a comparison of Mics vs EAD. I thought mics were better, but for practice and convience, Id sacrifice a little quality to increase workflow.
 

Mongrel

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Bitter sweet...I like that title.

I want to like this thing, but every time I see someone demo it I inevitably hear a bunch of gimmicky, downright 'silly' toy drum kit sounds (spacebanana? flanger? REALLY? I guess they forgot "Haunted House"? lol) and I immediately go into critical mode. The last thing I need are 50 "kits" I will never use and have to fart around with to get a sound that I like or can use. Reminds me of a Roland TD-6 for acoustic drums.

On the other hand, I can see the value of it and how it would simplify things both live and for recording, so I am not ruling out pursuing one (or something similar) at some point, even though the concept of triggered sounds drives me a little nuts. I guess we can just buy a Tama Stagestar and some Zildjian ZBTs now because everything will be triggered anyway. What's the point in buying high end gear?

I really think a more mature version-or at least more mature demos (as in don't wait until the last two minutes to show me a practical application) would help them sell this thing. Put one together that really focuses on accurately capturing YOUR drum sound rather than one that concentrates on triggering Yamaha's drum sound...
 

Toast Tee

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Bitter sweet...I like that title.

I want to like this thing, but every time I see someone demo it I inevitably hear a bunch of gimmicky, downright 'silly' toy drum kit sounds (spacebanana? flanger? REALLY? I guess they forgot "Haunted House"? lol) and I immediately go into critical mode. The last thing I need are 50 "kits" I will never use and have to fart around with to get a sound that I like or can use. Reminds me of a Roland TD-6 for acoustic drums.

On the other hand, I can see the value of it and how it would simplify things both live and for recording, so I am not ruling out pursuing one (or something similar) at some point, even though the concept of triggered sounds drives me a little nuts. I guess we can just buy a Tama Stagestar and some Zildjian ZBTs now because everything will be triggered anyway. What's the point in buying high end gear?

I really think a more mature version-or at least more mature demos (as in don't wait until the last two minutes to show me a practical application) would help them sell this thing. Put one together that really focuses on accurately capturing YOUR drum sound rather than one that concentrates on triggering Yamaha's drum sound...
I hear you, and agree with much of what you mentioned.
In my case, I heard it at a friend's house, who happens to be a pro when it comes to sound. His father has been a pro soundman since the 70's, and it seems to be in their blood.
I too hate with a passion the sounds, and effects they use in every single one of the videos for the thing! You're right, it sounds like thoes goofy sounds E drums can make.
Anyway, he had his kits micd up, and a click going in his headphones. I started playing, and thought "wow! This mix is perfect " I swore I was playing through his mics. Than I saw the box on the bass, and the brain. I never heard of the EAD before, and it made no sense. He had no effects going, and I was just getting the sound of the drums. Albeit, the sound ya get from a micd kit with headphones on.
I immediately took an interest, and he told me some of the things it can do. You can slow tunes down, without changing the pitch, if you wanted to figure out a drum part, ya can loop a few seconds. I than watched as many videos on it as I could find, and thought it was cheesy as hell.
No, you can't do everything you can with a board, but vice versa.
Yes, they can improve on it, and they DEFINITELY need to make better example videos. Instantly making vids, having the real feel of a drum kit, at a decent price (if you use Apple) was worth it for me.
Again, I will continue to learn the conventional way, as I'm actually learning.
I do hear ya with the crap kit, and silent cymbals, but that's not my plan, or intention. Idk if that would sound good, and have no desire to find out.
I have had, and have an e kit, and haven't touched it in ????
I'm curious to see how far they can go with this technology?
 

drummertom

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There are too many amazing microphones at unbelievably low prices right now.
The Yamaha is an interesting idea and seems good at what it does. It's definitely not going to replace traditional drum recording IMO.
What are some of the mics you’ve been looking at?
 

Toast Tee

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There are too many amazing microphones at unbelievably low prices right now.
The Yamaha is an interesting idea and seems good at what it does. It's definitely not going to replace traditional drum recording IMO.
One thing I try not to say, is never. It probably won't, but on their first cheaply done shot, they did a dam good job. I know it can be used with DAW as well, so a combo is also a possibility.
Fast forward 40 years, from the 80's, look at how far technology came.
Who would have thought we'd spend hours on end looking down at a cell phone.
Again, I'm not saying it's going to happen, but never is a powerful word
 

Whitten

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Doesn't matter if it's the 60's, 80's or 2000's, people are still using similar mics on a drum kit.
Yes, from time to time people will oscillate between two mics on the kit to maybe 20 mics on the kit, but people have been using SM57's, U87's, 414's, 421's and Coles/RCA ribbon mics on kits for decades.
The EAD videos I've seen have sounded weird to me. The video example 'Johnny K' posted, the mic mix sounded radically different to the EAD mix. each sounded OK in their own way, but they didn't even sound close to similar.
 

Whitten

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What are some of the mics you’ve been looking at?
I just bought the SE Electronics V7X. I next want to get their V Kick. Then there's Aston Mics and Vanguard Audio Labs. You can get a great (realistic) drum sound with anV7X a V Kick and a couple of nice room mics from Aston (for example).
 

Toast Tee

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I agree. Again, times change. Technology changes. And also, once again I didn't say it would take the place, but it is a possibility. To say it's impossible, well we have a lot of technology today we would have thought impossible.
Pro tools, is one example of how music is recorded today..
This is a mic, just a different type. Also it's the first, and almost positive, of many more to come. They will be better, more improved. The way it is now, it's not likely, but in a few years?
 

Whitten

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In the end, most things have improved in the sound category. Since more convenient digital came in, equipment makers have worked incredibly hard to recapture the warmth and presence of valves and tape.
That's the way drum recording is going - cheaper but better quality, better sounding gear.
I started recording in 1978, to 24 track analog tape. I've lived through ADATs, then big format, multi-track digital machines and now music software like Pro Tools.
I just don't see a bass drum mounted mic with a trigger for the bass drum as the future of drum recording.
I would definitely use it an an FX, mixed in with more normal mics.
 

Toast Tee

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I didn't either. I didn't even know that's what I was playing through. I was just messing with it. It's truly revolutionary. If ya haven't tried it, it's definitely worth a shot.
I'm still amazed.
I can also run this through my board, and DAW, I just haven't got there yet. I can't believe 1 stereo mic can get the levels this close.
When I first played it, I honestly thought I was running through mics..
 

Toast Tee

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Ok, I hate posting vids of my playing, but I think the quality (not the playing) is worth checking out.
I picked a drumles track, and stopped early to show.
I hadn't played this tune since 2010, but I knew I could kind of get through it.
This is 1 mic, and no effects. 26 inch bass Starclassic preformer. Not my playing kit
 

drummertom

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I just bought the SE Electronics V7X. I next want to get their V Kick. Then there's Aston Mics and Vanguard Audio Labs. You can get a great (realistic) drum sound with anV7X a V Kick and a couple of nice room mics from Aston (for example).
I have an Aston Spirit. Nice mic. I also want to check out some of the Lewitt miss. I'll have to take a look at the SE mics.
 

Toast Tee

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Alright. This is when everything is calibrated.
Not a very good cover, but this is 1 mic.
I did this at a friend's, and this is why I got it.
 

CAMDRUMS

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Very timely post. I watched this guy on YouTube do a comparison of Mics vs EAD. I thought mics were better, but for practice and convience, Id sacrifice a little quality to increase workflow.
This is the first time I am learning of this product. In the video he talks about plugging in a snare and bass trigger. Pardon my ignorance, but how is he getting the sounds for the rest of the kit?
 

Toast Tee

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This is the first time I am learning of this product. In the video he talks about plugging in a snare and bass trigger. Pardon my ignorance, but how is he getting the sounds for the rest of the kit?
I'll try to explain the best I can. I learned about right after I attempted that song. I knew I was about to be recorded, but didn't know how. That wasn't my kit, or device, but I did go get one the next day. I had no clue how I was hearing myself so clearly, nor did I ask at the time.
Anyway, what you're hearing is a single mic placed on the bass drum. The snare trigger as well as other triggers for the toms are optional. I believe the other triggers are for mixing and matching different drum sounds, from different sences?
I don't think I've seen a single vid/commercial that describes this accurately, or details how to use it.
You can plug the module directly into an iPhone, ipad, and instantly make a perfectly synced vids through a free app called Rec n Share, which allows ya to instantly upload the vids to YouTube, or other social media. I only shared that vid link with the members here, as I felt it's worth checking out.
I think there are a lot of misconceptions about this device. It seems most people who know about this, believe it can't pick up all the drums, and only to turn an accustic kit into an E kit. At least that's the impression I got......This is not the case at all, You can get the actual sound of the actual kit/cymbals, and that's what impressed me most. I have no idea how the thing works, but it does, and better than I could have ever imagined. I'm not real tech savvy, and still getting familiar with it.
(Unrelated, that Gretch Bell Brass snare is sweet!)
You would figure the toms furthest away from the mic would lose volume, and quality, but that's not the case either.
Adding the snare trigger doesn't necessarily make the snare louder, or anything, but rather allows you to mix and match "scenes" (assortment of different drum kits, sounds)
I did get the snare trigger for myself, but haven't used it yet.
I think there are kinks with this unit that still need to be worked out, but still an not familiar enough with it to say with certainty. I'll get a better feel for this as I become more familiar with what it can, or can't do in time. So far, I'm real impressed.
 

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