Black Onyx Rogers Rehab : Help Needed

benlums

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Howdy

Got an extremely beat up collection of black onyx rogers orphans, 20 13 16. They sound great. Finally have some time this week to get to do some rehab. I'm not interested in rewrapping -- I bought the drums because I like the vibe. Mostly just interested in keeping the damage from getting worse. The wrap is cracked and split all over, with some lifting on the bass drum. This is my first restoration so I have a few questions:

What is a safe way to prevent the wrap from further cracking and splitting?

What is a safe way to clean the interiors of the drums? They are pretty grimy.

After some poking around, seems like Novus 1 is the best way to go for polishing up the wrap?

Hardware is pitted, dirty, and some of it is pretty rusty. Im thinking a Dawn soak and some Bar Keepers friend? I want to avoid any abrasives I think.

OK! I really appreciate any input. Thanks.
 

Rich K.

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Novus 2. 1 does nothing really and 3 is very abrasive. Careful when polishing wraps with splits and cracks...you don't want to catch a corner with the rag.
 

DanC

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Unless there is paint or glue on the wrap, I use Maguiars Cleaner Wax liquid from the auto supply store. Does no damage, cleans, waxes and leaves a nice shine. I only use an abrasive (mild) if the wrap is really dull even after waxing.

On chrome I use Turtlewax Chrome Polish, from the autoparts store as well.

The paint finish inside those drums (early flat grey or later speckled) is not really meant to be cleaned. I usually spray a mild household cleaner on a towel and give the insides a modest rubdown, if they are pretty dirty. Grimy fingerprints (usually around the rerings if the drums have lived for a time with the heads off) can be a real pain - they usually stain the paint and won't come off, though you might lighten them a bit.


It's difficult to stabilize the cracked wrap: some superglue under the edges of the cracks, a few inches at a time, and some pressure will usually hold the edges flat. If there's a lot of cracks, this job is really time consuming. And usually with mixed results.

New Black Onyx wrap is available. It's not that difficult to work with, and it might pay to do the worst 1 or 2 drums that way.
 

JDZ

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It's great that you enjoy the vibe. The cracked and probably darkened black onyx will never be restored to look new. If the drums aren't subjected to major temperature changes, the cracks in the wrap should not progress. I've owned a few drums that have cracked pretty badly but the finish stuck to the wood. I've never had one with "lifting" wrap but if I did, I would attempt to glue it down. Use care if polishing the wrap as not to catch one of these lifted areas.

Dave
 

SwivoNut

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To clean rusted and pitted hardware I give them the old "Coke soak." I put the pieces in a plastic dish pan and soak them overnight in Coca Cola. The next day I rinse them off and all the surface rust is gone. Then I polish each piece with chrome polish that I bought from an automotive store. Any black pits that remain are from the rust eating through the chrome down to the bare metal and there is nothing you can do about that short of costly replating but the overall look of the polished chrome will improve the appearance when looking at it from a few feet away and you'll have to look up close to notice the pits.
 

benlums

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[sharedmedia=gallery:albums:1090]


Heres a link to some pics of the wrap issues
 

franke

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I know of nothing which will keep wrap from pealing once its started to crack, and I'm a bit puzzled why you want to clean the chrome (presumably to improve the looks) if you have no intention of rewrapping. Bear in mind that once a finish is in the state that this is in, there is no way to arrest the process, and little chunks may continue fall off as the kit is moved, set up, and torn down. The pieces that will remain are those where the mechanical bond of the glue is still present, and where it isn't, often what's keeping the wrap on is often the hardware itself, which if you intend to clean it (assuming that you'll take it off the shell), some other wrap pieces may come off, or become looser than they were before

That said, one way to clean rust off of chrome is to take a piece of aluminum foil, dip it in water (temperature doesn't matter) and rub the rusted area with it. There is a chemical reaction which occurs that will dissolve the surface rust. Soaking in Dawn also works to clean off schmutz, but if you want to avoid using abrasives, then do not use Barkeeper's Friend, for that too has a very fine abrasive in the liquid. If one wants to "passively" clean the chrome, get a vibrating tumbler from Harbor Freight Tools for under $60. Fill it with crushed walnut shells (much cheaper if bought in the reptile department at your local pet store), add your parts, turn it on, and three or four hours later, they're all clean.
 

benlums

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After taking off the hardware, I reglued the worst problem areas -- most were on the underside of the bass drum. The rack tom is fine. The floor tom wrap is cracked pretty badly but still seems basically secure on the drum. Almost like the wrap just shrunk a little bit.

Wanted to clean up the hardware mostly to get the drums to tune up easier. The tension rods were getting pretty squeaky.

I like that crushed walnut shell idea, clever!


franke said:
I know of nothing which will keep wrap from pealing once its started to crack, and I'm a bit puzzled why you want to clean the chrome (presumably to improve the looks) if you have no intention of rewrapping. Bear in mind that once a finish is in the state that this is in, there is no way to arrest the process, and little chunks may continue fall off as the kit is moved, set up, and torn down. The pieces that will remain are those where the mechanical bond of the glue is still present, and where it isn't, often what's keeping the wrap on is often the hardware itself, which if you intend to clean it (assuming that you'll take it off the shell), some other wrap pieces may come off, or become looser than they were before

That said, one way to clean rust off of chrome is to take a piece of aluminum foil, dip it in water (temperature doesn't matter) and rub the rusted area with it. There is a chemical reaction which occurs that will dissolve the surface rust. Soaking in Dawn also works to clean off schmutz, but if you want to avoid using abrasives, then do not use Barkeeper's Friend, for that too has a very fine abrasive in the liquid. If one wants to "passively" clean the chrome, get a vibrating tumbler from Harbor Freight Tools for under $60. Fill it with crushed walnut shells (much cheaper if bought in the reptile department at your local pet store), add your parts, turn it on, and three or four hours later, they're all clean.
 

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Rich K.

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benlums said:
After taking off the hardware, I reglued the worst problem areas -- most were on the underside of the bass drum. The rack tom is fine. The floor tom wrap is cracked pretty badly but still seems basically secure on the drum. Almost like the wrap just shrunk a little bit.

Wanted to clean up the hardware mostly to get the drums to tune up easier. The tension rods were getting pretty squeaky.

I like that crushed walnut shell idea, clever!


I know of nothing which will keep wrap from pealing once its started to crack, and I'm a bit puzzled why you want to clean the chrome (presumably to improve the looks) if you have no intention of rewrapping. Bear in mind that once a finish is in the state that this is in, there is no way to arrest the process, and little chunks may continue fall off as the kit is moved, set up, and torn down. The pieces that will remain are those where the mechanical bond of the glue is still present, and where it isn't, often what's keeping the wrap on is often the hardware itself, which if you intend to clean it (assuming that you'll take it off the shell), some other wrap pieces may come off, or become looser than they were before

That said, one way to clean rust off of chrome is to take a piece of aluminum foil, dip it in water (temperature doesn't matter) and rub the rusted area with it. There is a chemical reaction which occurs that will dissolve the surface rust. Soaking in Dawn also works to clean off schmutz, but if you want to avoid using abrasives, then do not use Barkeeper's Friend, for that too has a very fine abrasive in the liquid. If one wants to "passively" clean the chrome, get a vibrating tumbler from Harbor Freight Tools for under $60. Fill it with crushed walnut shells (much cheaper if bought in the reptile department at your local pet store), add your parts, turn it on, and three or four hours later, they're all clean.
Thing is with a tumbler you end up with a fine powder over everything and in all the threads, so you end up having to polish everything anyway. Did it bunch of times and realized I was spinning wheels.
 

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