Buddy and Louie talk Gadd and Bonzo

JimmySticks

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It's been the same for ever. The older generation gets passed up while the younger generation does its thing. New tastes, new styles, new gear (some innovations that work and some not so much). Some people try to keep learning with an open mind and some just get bitter about it. Buddy was clearly in the latter category (he even thought bebop was too progressive and busy according to the Monk book I just read). Someday it might be people like JD Beck and Chris Dave sitting around complaining about the young whippersnappers and all their shenanigans or maybe they'll still be in the thick of it. As a fan and amateur player I like to keep an open mind and see what else is out there not be dismissive of anything because it's new or I don't get it (yet).
Buddy was trying protect his living, his way of life and the music he loved. You can't blame the man for that. Nobody fought harder than he did to protect big band swing music. Many people, including many in the big band world, told him to give it up, but he never did and we were given many more years of swing because of his tenacious attitude. He could have went along with the changes and he probably would have been far better off financially, and maybe even a great(est) bop drummer, but not everyone looks at change as being better.

I'm glad he fought for his music.' I've got nothing but respect for the man.
 

Houndog

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Buddy was trying protect his living, his way of life and the music he loved. You can't blame the man for that. Nobody fought harder than he did to protect big band swing music. Many people, including many in the big band world, told him to give it up, but he never did and we were given many more years of swing because of his tenacious attitude. He could have went along with the changes and he probably would have been far better off financially, and maybe even a great(est) bop drummer, but not everyone looks at change as being better.

I'm glad he fought for his music.' I've got nothing but respect for the man.
Yes sir , me too .
 

CSR

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I know the buddy crew just don't understand this but is is possible to fire people without being an jerk. Buddy and Beefheart were just unprofessional about how they managed the tight ship they ran.
I think in music, you’re only as good as your last show. One bad performance, and a good number of the audience will not only never come to another show, but they’ll bad-mouth you to everyone they meet or interact with on social media. It was expected by Buddy that you could cut the gig. If your playing was causing the band to sound bad, you had to go, even if it meant right off the bandstand. I have read that Buddy often gave the fired player a ticket back home. Tough love.
 

swarfrat

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I think in music, you’re only as good as your last show. One bad performance, and a good number of the audience will not only never come to another show, but they’ll bad-mouth you to everyone they meet or interact with on social media. It was expected by Buddy that you could cut the gig. If your playing was causing the band to sound bad, you had to go, even if it meant right off the bandstand. I have read that Buddy often gave the fired player a ticket back home. Tough love.
Once again. Nowhere did I say anything about not firing people who couldn't keep up, weren't pulling their weight, or simply weren't the best. "Hey bud. This is a highly competitive gig, and you're just not cutting it
Thank you but we no longer need your services" vs berating your employees and screaming curses at them. It's about treating others with respect.
 

CSR

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Read what some players in Buddy’s band have to say about this...


Lots of artists at the absolute top of their game were rather harsh taskmasters to achieve perfection. Here’s the famous Toscanini:

Today, we’re all so sensitive and offended if our unique gift to the world is not properly appreciated.

We disagree.
 

swarfrat

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Nice underhanded snowflake jab. Kinda figured you'd take that route
 

MVE

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Wtf is he talking about on the Zeppelin show I wonder ??
2 million worth of of a huge kit ??
And some loincloth guy ???
Why would he just make stuff up ??
He may have been referring to the Timpani and the gong maybe?
Its entirely possible BR saw Zeppelin on a very off night. Although I am not one, I have heard some witnesses testify that Zeppelin live was a hit or miss affair.
I would bet BR might have had a different opinion if he had spent time with Bonham in a music studio.
 

moon the loon

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I remember reading Buddy’s quote years ago regarding the guy with the torch and it didn’t sound legit, so I looked into it a bit. Turns out it’s true, the guy was Mike Quashie, “The Limbo King;” he was a friend of Jimmy Page. He appeared during Whole Lotta Love at Madison Square Gardens on July 29, 1973, the last night of the tour and the last night of filming for “The Song Remains the Same.” Here’s a pic from the night and a pic with Page backstage:
Mike_Quashie_Led_Zep_1.jpg
Mike_Quashie_Led_Zep_2.jpg

Also, there’s a short clip of the incident on the Led Zep DVD, in the credits at 0:41:


Mike Quashie passed in 2019 at 88 years old.

Who knows, Maybe Buddy and Cathy can be spotted in the crowd shots of TSRTS?!

--Eric
 

Frank Godiva

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From jimmypagemusicblog

"1973:
This was the third performance in a row at Madison Square Garden. At the end of Whole Lotta Love, East Indian fire-eater Mike Quashie came dancing out on the stage with a couple of torches. He lit John Bonham's gong and one drumstick, but Bonzo just kept on playing.

This is the show where the robbery occurred of MSG receipts from the safety deposit box at the Drake Hotel. Originally reported as $203,000, the amount was $180,000 and no one was ever arrested for the theft. The band later sued the hotel and received a settlement.

After the show, the band went to a party held by Ahmet Ertegun to present gold records for Houses of the Holy.

This final night was also the final performance in this 1973 North American tour.

1973 29 July Jimmy Page/Led Zeppelin - New York, NY at Madison Square Garden
1973 Led Zeppelin at MSG - Mike Quashie lights Bonzo's fire

Led Zeppelin - New York 1973 - Houses of the Holy Gold Album Award.
 

Frank Godiva

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Hendrix best friend

Mike Quashie "performed with Led Zeppelin, was a constant companion to Lou Reed and became known, with a claim as quietly unchallenged as his title of Limbo King, as Jimi Hendrix's best friend." New York Times, September 27, 2003 When they met, Jimi Hendrix was performing with Curtis Knight and the Squires and Trinidadian Mike Quashie was headlining at the African Room, drawing celebrity admirers with his rocking voodoo performance. Among the first to recognize Hendrix's talent, Mike invited Jimi to visit him in Greenwich Village and offered a place to stay whenever needed. When Jimi began to make it big and needed a place to get away, he hid out at Mike's place. When he left for the Isle of Wight, Jimi left two trunks full of his personal belongings in the front room, the room set aside for his use. The foloowing 5 lots offered here are among the last.


 

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DFO thread on Buddy’s “managerial style” and infamous bus tapes:
 

Porgie66

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I remember reading Buddy’s quote years ago regarding the guy with the torch and it didn’t sound legit, so I looked into it a bit. Turns out it’s true, the guy was Mike Quashie, “The Limbo King;” he was a friend of Jimmy Page. He appeared during Whole Lotta Love at Madison Square Gardens on July 29, 1973, the last night of the tour and the last night of filming for “The Song Remains the Same.” Here’s a pic from the night and a pic with Page backstage:
View attachment 491267 View attachment 491268
Also, there’s a short clip of the incident on the Led Zep DVD, in the credits at 0:41:


Mike Quashie passed in 2019 at 88 years old.

Who knows, Maybe Buddy and Cathy can be spotted in the crowd shots of TSRTS?!

--Eric
You beat me to it. That was most certainly July 29 1973, when Quashie did his act onstage during the Whole Lotta Love ending, in which Bonzo goes berserker for nearly 10 minutes playing "jungle" drums. Buddy was obviously elephantizing Bonzo's 5 piece (Buddy style) set up with gong and tymps. I can see how Buddy would've been unimpressed with all the theatrics and volume but if he saw that bit, he stuck it out to end of a nearly 3 hour show, unless he arrived late!

Buddy's band played just before Zep at the Newport Jazz Fest in July of '69. I seem to recall reading somewhere that he was in a hurry to get out of there once Zeppelin started, but I haven't heard any other stories about them actually meeting. Maybe they did that night. Bonzo obviously admired him.
 
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BoomBoom

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Buddy was an amazing drummer, and also had, lets say, an interesting personality. I remember watching him on the The Tonight Show. When he was playing he was awesome. When when he was talking to Johnny he came of as an ego maniacal twit.

I didn't really dig his anti-country thing cuz at the time I was also into Willie Nelson, David Alan Coe, and Jerry Jeff Walker.

But I love his band and his playing. They were so good.

In response to Buddy and be bop, I have an album my brother gave me years ago with Charlie Parker, Lester Young, Coleman Hawkins, and Dizzy among others. Buddy plays the final 2 tracks on the album.


And finally, hats off to those that chased down the Led Zeppelin story. Nice work.
 

studrum

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He may have been referring to the Timpani and the gong maybe?
Its entirely possible BR saw Zeppelin on a very off night. Although I am not one, I have heard some witnesses testify that Zeppelin live was a hit or miss affair.
I would bet BR might have had a different opinion if he had spent time with Bonham in a music studio.
Growing up, I had always heard from the older heads that Zeppelin even sucked live, was just too loose. That was the talk around my town. Then I saw 'em twice, a few years apart, and...they didn't suck. What it was was that they jammed stuff out, stretched it. They were frighteningly good.

But thanks to the researchers. Yes, Spinal Tap comes from somewhere....
 

Vistalite Black

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Buddy was trying protect his living, his way of life and the music he loved. You can't blame the man for that. Nobody fought harder than he did to protect big band swing music. Many people, including many in the big band world, told him to give it up, but he never did and we were given many more years of swing because of his tenacious attitude. He could have went along with the changes and he probably would have been far better off financially, and maybe even a great(est) bop drummer, but not everyone looks at change as being better.

I'm glad he fought for his music.' I've got nothing but respect for the man.
Was Buddy Rich fighting to protect big band music when he quit playing drums in 1956 to launch a career as a singer?

 


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