Building a Drum Room Questions

Bart2278

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So I bought some drums, haven't played in 10+ years, and I am trying to build a small 8x8 room/platform in my unfinished basement where i can house the drums to play them. The platform is built.

Now for the main question, what do i need to insulate the walls with and what do i need to put on the walls to keep as much sound from escaping as possible? The platform is pushed up against a corner so two walls will be the basement walls which are cinder blocks. I will build two additional walls made 2x4's like a normal wall and they will tie in to the existing basement cinder blocks.
 

amosguy

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Mass stop sound. Build the walls with staggered stud construction with 5/8 sheetrock on both sides. Sound insulation inside the walls. And suspended ceiling isolated with Z strips for sound break.

An issue you might have will be ventilation. A small closed room will get pretty uncomfortable quickly.

Lots of videos to study and find what will work for your room. About a million solutions out there, so good luck.
 

Mongrel

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The walls are not the problem in a basement, (unless you are sharing the space with other at the same time).

It's the ceiling (and the door at the top of the steps to a lessor extent) that is the problem.

I would suggest concentrated on sound proofing the ceiling and sound-deadening the walls.

Ventilation is a major issue, and you should orient your drum toom to an area without any ductwork if at all possible.

You could sound proof the area two foot thick and if you play below a duct it will reverberate sound to every room in the house.

First question should be "where" the "how".

And as mentioned above-plan in some type of independent ventilation for you drum space. If you don't neither your or your drums will be happy for long....
 

cworrick

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I realize this is opening a can of worms...

This subject comes up so often that maybe it's time to create a new sub topic in the Main forum. We've certainly had enough questions and posts about drum rooms/soundproofing to fill a book. Might make a great quick resource for anyone (even non drummers) looking for info on this subject. Might save some time from trying to hit all the right keywords in the search function too.
:salute:

flame on.
 

Rick Jones1

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You might also look at QuietRock instead of 5/8" Sheetrock but still use the staggered studs. As already stated you will need to add some ventilation, as the room could be mostly air tight without it. And consider the type of door you plan to use. I used two solid core doors bolted together with a double pane window and heavy weather stripping.

Good luck.
 

Joe61

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Your biggest gains in sound abatement will come from mechanically de-coupling the drum side of the room from the space outside of the room. Think of a room, four walls a floor and a ceiling floating within an air space inside another room with four walls a floor and a ceiling.
This is of course over kill but you get the idea. I have in the past built
quiet rooms for customers and had good success. Let me know if you would like help.

Joe
 

mkelley

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10lbs producer blankets on the wall. They work wonders and some examples are on rdavidr's Youtube
 

blueshadow

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Big ole rabbit hole....everything and anything you want to know about it....and yes it will be expensive

Best analogy I read was thinking of a fish tank with a closed lid and you have to keep water from leaking out of all the sides and top....that's what you need, but then also have to have air to breathe :)
 

Blisco

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I had great success on my room-within-a-room 15X20 drum room. The offset studs were key to allow the use of limp-mass vinyl inside the walls and double layered over the ceiling studs. A solid oak door and 8" walls did a great job too. All 110v was inside but and all lights were track lights to avoid can light holes in the ceiling. The only bad thing about making it soundproof is the lack of ventilation. When the band practiced late at night, we had to stop every 30 minutes and step out.

I was able to play drum directly below my wife at midnight without complaint. It was as glorious as it was expensive.
 

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CherryClassic

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I watched part of a video some years ago and they were building a TV theater and sound proofing it from the rest of the house. They explained that they had to create air space between the walls. They put large sheets of plastic on both sides of a 2x4 studded wall. Basically built a room inside of a room plus they used some kind of rubber cushioning between the walls and under the bottom 2x4 on the floor. They explained that any vibration from the enter wall to outer wall would create a sound.

I really don't know what I'm talking about, so try to watch as many videos on You Tube as you can.

I don't know but if you are in a basement I would maybe start with just soundproofing the sealing then install two hardwood doors with rubber seals all the way around each door going into the house. Are all of the basement walls under ground?

I did a recording at a home studio years ago and all of the doors were doubled and we were told that every wall within the studio were double walls. There was a room with a grand piano, a drum room, room for horns and the singer had a mic in side the recording room. All electric guitars, etc had plug in jacks in the wall. I was taking a break in the next room (kitchen) talking to his wife and we never heard a sound from the studio.

sherm
 
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i built a room in my detached garage years ago for my (very loud) band to practice in, and it was quite successful. Used the room-within-a-room technique, double sheet rock(with staggered seams), and floated the room using these type of pads between the actual floor and the joists of the floating room-

Like Blisco said above, ventilation is the problem. We also had to stop every half hour or so and run the AC. We had a small unit in the wall of the practice room itself(which did let sound leak through, this is definitely not the best solution), but AC units output heat, and the heat would quickly build up in the "foyer" and seep back in to the space. So it was only practical to run the AC with the outside door open... Not ideal, but it worked for us under the circumstances. IIRC we spent somewhere around $3k building the space around 15 years ago. Seeing as it was a detached garage, we could be a little less careful with what we were doing, but it was still very effective. years later my neighbors never knew we had a band that practiced there...
 
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owr

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Like many have said, isolation room within a room is really the only way to get this done. I have recently finished up a project in my backyard, also used some fancy materials like mass loaded vinyl in both sets of walls. It certainly helps, but is expensive, and I think you get a lot more bang for the buck from simple mechanical decoupling.

What hasn’t been mentioned is that a small 8’x8’ room will sound horrible inside without serious treatment. Assuming you also have 8’ ceilings, you’ll have a perfect cube, which is pretty much the worst dimensions one can have. My studio is 8’ x 10’, I slightly pitched the ceiling just to break up the box. I’ve already put in $600 on materials to acoustically treat the interior so it is tolerable, and just spent another $1000 today to finish the job. Funny thing happens when you seal a room and don’t let sound out...

Good luck, it’s not a simple job but once it’s done it’s liberating. I can play in mine at 11 pm, neighbors with walls 10’ away cant hear unless they go outside.
 

jskdrums

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Exactly This!!! It's a rabbit hole, but worth going down if you want really legit results.. WARNING..this is NOT for the impatient or the quick fix...

Big ole rabbit hole....everything and anything you want to know about it....and yes it will be expensive

Best analogy I read was thinking of a fish tank with a closed lid and you have to keep water from leaking out of all the sides and top....that's what you need, but then also have to have air to breathe :)
 


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