Built this snare to sell, but ...

jeffh

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Curious if you don't mind me asking, how much would a snare similar to that one go for?
I don't mind at all. It would go for $900 fitted out like this.

(Admins, if my answering is against the rules, my apologies and feel free to delete this reply.)
 

Old PIT Guy

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A little off the topic, but could you explain the design decision to place the throw-off opposite the badge orientation typically seen on snare drums? IOW, most right handed players position the drum so the throw in on the left side to allow the dominant hand freedom to play while the left moves the lever. If your drums are positioned that way the badge faces the player's crotch and not straight ahead
 

jeffh

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I know, it's a little departure from the industry norm.

The reason the industry puts the badge on the audience side of the drum is that the industry wants to use the space to advertise to those who don't own the drum so they can sell another one like it.

The reason I put the badge on the player's side is that, to me, it's the more important relationship. Symbolic, I know, but it's representative of who the drum is for. It's built for the artist, not the crowd.

Also, in a kit setup the front of the snare is mostly hidden, nobody can read the name on the badge unless they're within a few feet, and the vast majority of the audience are non-drummers anyway. I've been told many times that the design style of Carolina Drumworks snares is distinctive enough to be recognizable, which is a big part of branding -- if you build with generic wraps and generic lugs and generic colors, or if every drum you build looks completely different from the others then, yes, you probably need to hang a big sign on the front so someone can tell who you are.

Something that makes me happy is when I get to build drums for people who have liked the sound of a drum they've heard being played, asked the artist about it, and contacted me to get that for themselves.

Yeah, I know I'm imposing my own values on the design, but that's the whole point, really. :)
 

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