Byzance Foundry Reserve...Success or Dud?

Gcort49

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I have some Byzance in a bag...all Jazz series/dark/dry/flats. I like what Meinl has done with the series.
Since they introduced the Foundry Reserve, I set my sights on picking up a 20 or 22...
I have noticed an influx hitting the pre-owned market. Too soon, IMO, for a 'new' cymbal to be flooding the used market.
Enough to have me thinking, was this roll-out a dud?

Anyone with experience on them....can't seem to find much chatter on the forums or review searches
 

Mcjnic

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I doubt very seriously the cymbals are “duds”.

Cymbals of this caliber are very much a product of artisans.
As such, they are not necessarily appreciated or even understood by the novice.
And for the seasoned artist, the selection is quite limited ... to the point of discomfort.

My guess ... due to the lack of stock, individuals picked up what was locally available or what was in stock online. They got them and within a short time, had buyers remorse ... due to the investment required.

The lack of selection pushed several of the subjects into purchasing cymbals that were AVAILABLE and not hand selected and trialed.

They wished for the feel to be a bit lighter ... or stiffer ... or perhaps a more separate bell ... you get the idea.

That is really not the optimum path for purchases of this type of equipment.
An amp? Sure.
A snare? Sure.
A computer for your DAWS? Sure.

But a freekin hand formed cymbal? Ridiculous thought.

This is my belief on the topic.
 

bongomania

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Pretty much the only marketing I saw for these was from endorsers, so I imagine a bunch of them got free cymbals and are now flipping them.
 

studrum

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I doubt very seriously the cymbals are “duds”.

Cymbals of this caliber are very much a product of artisans.
As such, they are not necessarily appreciated or even understood by the novice.
And for the seasoned artist, the selection is quite limited ... to the point of discomfort.

My guess ... due to the lack of stock, individuals picked up what was locally available or what was in stock online. They got them and within a short time, had buyers remorse ... due to the investment required.

The lack of selection pushed several of the subjects into purchasing cymbals that were AVAILABLE and not hand selected and trialed.

They wished for the feel to be a bit lighter ... or stiffer ... or perhaps a more separate bell ... you get the idea.

That is really not the optimum path for purchases of this type of equipment.
An amp? Sure.
A snare? Sure.
A computer for your DAWS? Sure.

But a freekin hand formed cymbal? Ridiculous thought.

This is my belief on the topic.

Pretty sure I agree with you thoroughly on this. In other words, when people are shelling out that kind of moola on an all-unique musical instrument, they need to actually be in a room with it and play it. Imagine that...
 

GeeDeeEmm

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I've heard the Reserves only on video, but what I hear there is something very special, a tone that lives up to the hype. Some of the most intimate and finely-honed sounds in the industry.

I suspect, though, that those very qualities may be the reason behind their availability on the used market already. The cymbals are obviously very "quiet" and soft-spoken when compared to the regular fare. Their voice is so nice that they almost stand out as solo instruments and not as adaptable to integration within a louder environment. I know this comparison is rather stretched, but using these in a regular time-keeping role would be akin to installing the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel in a greasy backyard garage.

Sometimes something that is SO SPECIAL as these severely limits their utility.

GeeDeeEmm
 

halldorl

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I own and use a few BFR’s. 14” hats, 20” and 22” rides. They are very fine instruments and since I got them they have seen daily use more or less. They are not that quiet and pretty “normal” sounding cymbals compared to a lot of Meinl’s dark and trashy offerings. The 20” ride is very versatile and I use it in all kinds of situations while the 22” ride is more in the jazz vein due to it’s lower pitch and spread.

The 18” crash I have is the only one I have not really connected with but I used it on a recording session a few weeks back and I realised it records beautifully.

The bottom line is that these cymbals inspire me. They blend beautifully and in a band setting you realise just how beautiful they are.
 

Gcort49

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I own and use a few BFR’s. 14” hats, 20” and 22” rides. They are very fine instruments and since I got them they have seen daily use more or less. They are not that quiet and pretty “normal” sounding cymbals compared to a lot of Meinl’s dark and trashy offerings. The 20” ride is very versatile and I use it in all kinds of situations while the 22” ride is more in the jazz vein due to it’s lower pitch and spread.

The 18” crash I have is the only one I have not really connected with but I used it on a recording session a few weeks back and I realised it records beautifully.

The bottom line is that these cymbals inspire me. They blend beautifully and in a band setting you realise just how beautiful they are.
Perhaps I am too use to the Paiste 'step on glass' shimmer and sound imbedded in my head for years, but I swear, listening to your video display of these, I hear some similarities....all in a very good way.

You demoed these beautifully (in your video's) and convinced me to pursue them
 


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