Calfskin as snare reso

Drumstickdude

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I'm using a Majetone calfskin thin batter head on my 51/2" cloud badge Krupa model radio king and also rotate by taking it off and putting it on my 60s solid shell 10 lug slingerland snare, I'm only interested in using calf on snares not toms. Far to expensive and not always gig practical. it's the best sound I've ever had out of it. I put off getting one for a while as I worried about the well documented problems due to changes in the weather affecting tuning. Well it turned out to be not nearly so bad at all, while it can go 'out' slightly, I'd say it's almost an exaggeration- and tuning it good and even in the first place helps, I go for quite a tight tuning being carefull not to let it choke out. I want to ask if anyone has experience using a calfskin (slunk) snare drum resonant head on the snare side- does it cause even worse weather related sound problems than using just a calf snare batter head. Also what is the sound and performance like compared to a standard Mylar head?
 

Edward

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I'm using a Majetone calfskin thin batter head on my 51/2" cloud badge Krupa model radio king and also rotate by taking it off and putting it on my 60s solid shell 10 lug slingerland snare, I'm only interested in using calf on snares not toms. Far to expensive and not always gig practical. it's the best sound I've ever had out of it. I put off getting one for a while as I worried about the well documented problems due to changes in the weather affecting tuning. Well it turned out to be not nearly so bad at all, while it can go 'out' slightly, I'd say it's almost an exaggeration- and tuning it good and even in the first place helps, I go for quite a tight tuning being carefull not to let it choke out. I want to ask if anyone has experience using a calfskin (slunk) snare drum resonant head on the snare side- does it cause even worse weather related sound problems than using just a calf snare batter head. Also what is the sound and performance like compared to a standard Mylar head?
I use calf skin batter and reso on my Ludwig vintage downbeat piccolo snare drum. It gives it a warm, rich, meaty sound. The snare off sound is particularly smooth and open. If you like it in the top you will like it in the bottom.
Ed
 

Drumstickdude

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I use calf skin batter and reso on my Ludwig vintage downbeat piccolo snare drum. It gives it a warm, rich, meaty sound. The snare off sound is particularly smooth and open. If you like it in the top you will like it in the bottom.
Ed
Thanks for the reply. I was just worried about a calf snare side reso head loosening off in tightness, as I do like that head very tight for good snap ( while trying to retain good tone) When I have appropriate funds I'm now going to try it.
 

Castnblast

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I have a calf reso (and batter) on an early Leedy Ludwig. Didnt know what to expect - but wanted to try it because thats likly how the drum was set up back in the day.
I use it for brushes at home or in the studio but never live.

My experience is the same as Drumstickdude
 

multijd

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I’ve been experimenting with calf and recently put some Kentville kangaroo heads on the tops of a couple of older snares. I have calf on a couple of bass drums and some toms. I’ve decided to use the calf on drums which are staying put in one environment to try to maximize the reliability. The sound is beautiful.

The snare batters are the kangaroo and they are on a Leedy and Ludwig 1952 6.5” drum it sounds great when I take it out for big band or brush heavy gigs. The other is a 1935 Leedy broadway standard. I had calf on the top and bottom of that drum and even though it was in my studio is changed quite a bit day to day. The snare head had a lot of variability too so the combination was sometimes quite humorous. I popped the top head one day when it was sounding great. It was an old head and kind of thin so I wasn’t too upset. But it gave me an opportunity to clean up the drum and put a new kangaroo hide on top. I decided rather than put the calf snare head back on, to put on a Remo renaissance snare head. It’s supposed to simulate the calf snare head. They sound good together and are more consistent than the double calf combo.
 
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jptrickster

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I always felt the best all around snare drum sound came from a calf batter and a thin plastic reso especially on a brass shelled Slingerland.
 


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