Carl Palmer and the 50 Worst Acts in Music History

bpaluzzi

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The first ELP album “opened the door for me“ as to what a drummer in a rock band could do. I bought Tarkus when it was released (I was 13). I’m enjoying the Rachel Flowers performance of it as I write this.
Agree the list is a yawn...but it did create pages of posts about music.

I’ve heard Phil Collins say he didn’t care for Carl Palmer’s playing, (he preferred Billy Cobham),
but if you want to make lists does CP not make the top ten list of drummers of the past 50 years?
Top ten? No, not close for me.
 

dale w miller

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I don't doubt it... I also believe that some people don't really make a distinction between artistic quality and salability in their work. They aren't necessarily creating their work to satisfy any kind of creative type muse and are instead trying to figure out what people want. What's "good" to these people is what they can sell the most of; they let their audience determine what's good by how much of the product they buy. The kind of artists that I appreciate most are the ones who I feel are creating the work first and foremost for themselves and not for an audience...
The interesting part to me is after their popularity has past, they don’t understand why they aren’t respected or why their audience has faded.
 

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The interesting part to me is after their popularity has past, they don’t understand why they aren’t respected or why their audience has faded.
It seems to me that certain very successful artists have become successful by making exactly the music that they wanted to make, rather than kowtowing to what they (and their record labels) might have thought that the public wanted and what they could make the biggest buck with. Rather than try and tackle the pop market with a some sort of blockbuster single, they made music that appealed to a much smaller core of people and built that core over a period of time into a huge fanbase. The irony is that very often the artists who don't compromise their work and who build their audience slowly end up being much more successful in the long run than those who are willing to do anything for a hit and end up being very successful from the get go...
 

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Its not a real 50 worst of anything if Pearl Jam are not on the list.
That band is probably not among my all time least favorites, but it's very high on some sort of list of least favorites of bands that so many people take very seriously and tend to like other stuff that I like. I had a friend who had musical taste which largely overlapped mine and PJ was his favorite band... he was anyways trying to get me into them, but I could never relate to what they do. I don't think that they'd be in most "worst music lists" because they're generally so revered. They're a bit like licorice or something in that the folks who like it really like it and those who don't really hate the stuff...
 

Deafmoon

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I had the pleasure of sitting behind Carl in 1978 at ELP’s Nassau Coliseum Performance and he was brilliant. Look, I never liked everything they did (Tiger in a Spotlight) and felt on every ELP album there’s corniness (Are You Ready Eddy?) thrown in. What made ELP so good though is that the stuff that was not corny (Karn Evil Part 1,2,3 or Pirates or Pictures) was incredible!
 

Gregdc

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That band is probably not among my all time least favorites, but it's very high on some sort of list of least favorites of bands that so many people take very seriously and tend to like other stuff that I like. I had a friend who had musical taste which largely overlapped mine and PJ was his favorite band... he was anyways trying to get me into them, but I could never relate to what they do. I don't think that they'd be in most "worst music lists" because they're generally so revered. They're a bit like licorice or something in that the folks who like it really like it and those who don't really hate the stuff...
I also had a friend who was PJ obsessed and was always trying to dish me their catalogue, but 85% of their output makes my skin crawl. You're right about their 'crossover' appeal, I can also see how they turned grunge into radio friendly pedestrian MOR plod. The addition of Matt Cameron is their only saving grace - I have all the time in the world for Soundgarden though, a completely different beast to Pearl Jam. Fierce...brooding...progressive.
 

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I also had a friend who was PJ obsessed and was always trying to dish me their catalogue, but 85% of their output makes my skin crawl. You're right about their 'crossover' appeal, I can also see how they turned grunge into radio friendly pedestrian MOR plod. The addition of Matt Cameron is their only saving grace - I have all the time in the world for Soundgarden though, a completely different beast to Pearl Jam. Fierce...brooding...progressive.
Yeah, not really a big fan but I do really like Soundgarden's music and particularly Cameron's drumming. I first heard him on an obscure but cool record (their debut) by a very arty progressive sort of band by the name of the Tone Dogs. I'm not sure if Cameron played much with them, but he sounds great on that album. I believe that they were for Seattle and then moved to where I live, Portnad and I saw a lot of shows with the drummer who needed up playing on most of their stuff, who was also great...
 

exliontamer

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It seems to me that certain very successful artists have become successful by making exactly the music that they wanted to make, rather than kowtowing to what they (and their record labels) might have thought that the public wanted and what they could make the biggest buck with. Rather than try and tackle the pop market with a some sort of blockbuster single, they made music that appealed to a much smaller core of people and built that core over a period of time into a huge fanbase. The irony is that very often the artists who don't compromise their work and who build their audience slowly end up being much more successful in the long run than those who are willing to do anything for a hit and end up being very successful from the get go...
Yes! Also the band Yes is a good example of that. One could argue that The Beatles career was built on them refusing to do the song George Martin suggested as their first single and recording Love Me Do. Rush made 2112 in defiance. I have no issue if people want to pander to be popular and I love a lot of music made that way. Most people want other people to like what they do but the people I most love and a lot of things that stick around have a tendency to be iconoclastic.
 

dale w miller

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well at least my band is not on there for once. Unfortunately there are a few of my favorite bands of all time on there...

I also was fortunate enough to see ELP play at California jam and at a four channel concert at the Long Beach Arena during the brain salad surgery tour. They were amazing and I’m a pretty critical listener...
What band were you in, The Osmonds?

It's certainly is interesting to think back to when I was a kid just discovering music. I may be a little younger than some having been born in 1970. My parents are not the music type so my love of music didn't really hit me until I was around 11 or so. There was no youTube or instant way to hear music unless a song came on the radio or in my case, I had the record and put it on my parents ancient turntable. I think what is interesting is that at 11 years old, I had no real bias for anything musical. At that age I had no idea that music was made for financial gain and it never would have dawned on me that someone might not actually play music of their own that they did not like.

Music was just music to my young ears and if I liked it, I liked it. I never had cable either and when MTV started happening, I only saw it at friends houses. I certainly remember hearing Only Time Will Tell on the radio and thought it was a great song. It never would have occured to me that these were guys trying to make radio friendly songs. I got into Van Halen around this time too and one of my favorite songs is Dance The Night Away. I have always loved the melody, the tempo, the cowbell intro, the harmonic stuff Eddie plays and mostly the amazing harmonies with Michael Anthony doing the sweet high notes. It would never have occured to me that any of the band members would have disliked the song and yet years later, I read an interview where Alex Van Halen claimed he hated that song. He said they would speed it up live just to get the thing over with. Even though I was older when I heard this, that was kind of like being told that Santa Clause isn't real. My point is that I kind of miss those innocent days when I wasn't so clouded by music and the industry it has become. I miss just hearing a song without any bias whatsoever and liking it just because I liked it.
I am just a little younger than you, so I can totally relate to this other than the bands themselves. I connected more with the new wave bands, but unfortunately in my area the only genre played was metal. Within driving distance of my house there were the two clubs that the hair bands Cinderella and Britney Fox came from, so you can imagine what surrounded me.

As a backlash, all the people who didn’t like that music played metal like Metallica, Slayer, Iron Maiden, etc., bands that were technically challenging. If it wasn’t difficult to play, it wasn’t “good”. I can still remember my friend making fun of The Police’s Synchronicity II, the only song I thought was heavy enough to get my friends to play with me.

I realized really quickly how little power the drummer had. I had to play what they wanted to learn or I played by myself. I at least was able to apply this lesson to the future songwriters I played with. Without the song, there is no band.

Playing new wave was also very expensive for the most part to emulate their sound considering the gear used for many of the acts. Basically, I got sidetracked for 3 years until I went to college. Don’t get me wrong, I’m grateful my mind was opened up to appreciate other genres, but playing in those of bands was definitely not me.
 

Tdipaul

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From a drummers perspective these should be removed from the list

02. Emerson, Lake & Palmer
05. Starship (Jefferson, with Aynsley)
07. Asia
13. Mick Jagger ("Dont Tear Me Up" is a great drum song)
22 Primus
23. Creed
32. Hooters
37. Doors
41. Whitesnake (Cozy and Aynsley)
46.Spin Doctors
47. Goo Goo Dolls (the early stuff)
49. Toad the Wet Sprocket ("Something's Always Wrong" made me a fan)
 

Gregdc

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From a drummers perspective these should be removed from the list

02. Emerson, Lake & Palmer
05. Starship (Jefferson, with Aynsley)
07. Asia
13. Mick Jagger ("Dont Tear Me Up" is a great drum song)
22 Primus
23. Creed
32. Hooters
37. Doors
41. Whitesnake (Cozy and Aynsley)
46.Spin Doctors
47. Goo Goo Dolls (the early stuff)
49. Toad the Wet Sprocket ("Something's Always Wrong" made me a fan)
Nah, Creed can definitely stay in there!
 

DanC

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This list is stupid.

Anyone who could put The Doors on a list like this has no business creating any kind of list in the first place.

I'm not even that big a fan of the Doors myself, but how do you not recognize their place in rock history...

And there are even worse entries than that on the list.
 

Vistalite Black

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And they provided joy and an escape to the world at that time. Even though both acts you mention have equivalent talent to the Cheeky Girls, they had their couple of hits and still provide a little bit of excitement at night clubs when they get play. Yes, I am a fan of the Cheeky Girls. Look them up!

They had that recipe: a hook, easy to sing along with and the performers were aesthetically pleasing.
So interesting to me that someone would post a thread to condemn this one as "petty and evil," then would go back and participate in the petty and evil thread. What's the word for that?
 


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