CB700

W

wayne

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Picked up a metal 5.5x14 in v/g condition for next to nothing and am waiting for it to arrive...Any info on these,apparently from the 80,s??
 

galaxy08

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I recently got one in a bulk drum purchase. It's a 10-lug model from the 80s and is actually a pretty cool drum. I had one as a teenager and remember it sounding a lot like the Motown drums, which I used to play along with. I haven't played my "new" one yet, though I'm looking forward to it! Let me know what you think of yours.
 

Elvis

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Generic steel shelled snare drum.
Type is still available.
Used to trade 'em for all kinds of things. Albums, weed, a ham sandwich...
Weren't worth much. Shell is very thin and pressed sheet steel.
If you notice a "goldish rainbow" like hue on the inside of the shell, that's just the galvanizing.
That drum was most likely used and abused for 20 years or more.
Rods will probably be a little rough and check all the nuts in the lugs for cracks.
Beginner drummers are usually the recipients of these drums and it seems we all go through that "crank 'em" stage where we haven't learned all the ins and outs of tuning yet, so we just keep pullng up the tension until we get a sound, somewhat, like we're looling for.
This very high tension can be hard on the lugs and nuts.
Not a bad sounding drums. VERY resonant and tends to ring like a thin bell.
I found covering the inside of a 5" deep generic steel shelled snare drum with a layer of duct tape mellowed out the sound and got rid of a very faint, rather quiet but still annoying high pitched ring.
Almost makes you think its tinnitus, until you start dampening the shell.
Made the drum sound like a cross between a wood drum and a metal one.

...btw, there was a parallel throw-off version called a CB-700 "Marc" snare drum.
I've never seen one but I understand they can be rather nice players.




Elvis
 

bzzfkt

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Generic steel shelled snare drum.
Type is still available.
Used to trade 'em for all kinds of things. Albums, weed, a ham sandwich...
Weren't worth much. Shell is very thin and pressed sheet steel.
If you notice a "goldish rainbow" like hue on the inside of the shell, that's just the galvanizing.
That drum was most likely used and abused for 20 years or more.
Rods will probably be a little rough and check all the nuts in the lugs for cracks.
Beginner drummers are usually the recipients of these drums and it seems we all go through that "crank 'em" stage where we haven't learned all the ins and outs of tuning yet, so we just keep pullng up the tension until we get a sound, somewhat, like we're looling for.
This very high tension can be hard on the lugs and nuts.
Not a bad sounding drums. VERY resonant and tends to ring like a thin bell.
I found covering the inside of a 5" deep generic steel shelled snare drum with a layer of duct tape mellowed out the sound and got rid of a very faint, rather quiet but still annoying high pitched ring.
Almost makes you think its tinnitus, until you start dampening the shell.
Made the drum sound like a cross between a wood drum and a metal one.

...btw, there was a parallel throw-off version called a CB-700 "Marc" snare drum.
I've never seen one but I understand they can be rather nice players.




Elvis






i've never had a cb snare, but i've had a couple of 5 piece kits, ( one of which i gave away, wish i hadn't)....i like these for cheapos....my sets had mahogany shells...the 16's are 6 lug, so not very tunable....but if you have a nice snare the bass works real nice....
 

TommyWells

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Keep your eyes open, though guys. CB-700 made the first "free-floating" system snare drum. Pearl then bought the rights to the system and has been building them ever since. I had 2 of them for about a year in or around 1987 when they first came out. I sold them when the company I was with made me drums to replace them. Now, over 20 years later, I wish that I had just put them on a shelf somewhere and kept them. :blackeye:
 

Roch

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I had a CB700 International kit years ago. I gave it to my son. He still uses the kick drum for gigging. I've offered him other drums but he says 'no thanks. I like this one" Fine with me, man. Whatever floats yer boat!!

You may want to put a heavier head on that to cut down on ring, unless you like the ring.
 

Luddite

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Speaking of heavier heads, give an Evans Genera HD a try---worked wonders for my LM 302 Ludwig 6.5x14 steel snare. That thing sounds almost as good as my Supra 402 now.
 

Elvis

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Generic steel shelled snare drum.
Type is still available.
Used to trade 'em for all kinds of things. Albums, weed, a ham sandwich...
Weren't worth much. Shell is very thin and pressed sheet steel.
If you notice a "goldish rainbow" like hue on the inside of the shell, that's just the galvanizing.
That drum was most likely used and abused for 20 years or more.
Rods will probably be a little rough and check all the nuts in the lugs for cracks.
Beginner drummers are usually the recipients of these drums and it seems we all go through that "crank 'em" stage where we haven't learned all the ins and outs of tuning yet, so we just keep pullng up the tension until we get a sound, somewhat, like we're looling for.
This very high tension can be hard on the lugs and nuts.
Not a bad sounding drums. VERY resonant and tends to ring like a thin bell.
I found covering the inside of a 5" deep generic steel shelled snare drum with a layer of duct tape mellowed out the sound and got rid of a very faint, rather quiet but still annoying high pitched ring.
Almost makes you think its tinnitus, until you start dampening the shell.
Made the drum sound like a cross between a wood drum and a metal one.

...btw, there was a parallel throw-off version called a CB-700 "Marc" snare drum.
I've never seen one but I understand they can be rather nice players.




Elvis






i've never had a cb snare, but i've had a couple of 5 piece kits, ( one of which i gave away, wish i hadn't)....i like these for cheapos....my sets had mahogany shells...the 16's are 6 lug, so not very tunable....but if you have a nice snare the bass works real nice....
Yeah, I had a CB-700 kit back in the 80's.
I added a 14" floor tom to it, that I kept from a little "Rogers" bop kit I used for a short time.
Had the old Swivo knock-off hardware on it and one of the set screws that held one of the tom arms in position stripped, so I flipped the base around and just used one rack tom at a time.
This gave me options I had never considered before.
My setup thus became either 22/12/14 or 22/13/16. I figured since people would want to see the bigger drums (and they matched), I kept that as the "stage" outfit and used the smaller tom setup (since that 14" floor tom didn't match) for jams, auditions and session work.
This arrangement actually worked out quite nicely because the smaler toms made karting that kit around so much easier!
I was really surprised what a difference changing from 13/16 to 12/14 made, from that aspect.
The kit came with a 14x5 chromed steel shell CB-700 snare drum.
Nothing really special, but it did the job.
Used it with a number of different heads over the time I had the kit. Mostly I used coated Ambassadors on it, though.
It had this "clank" to its sound that came across really nice. Worked great for all the rock stuff I did back then. Once I got the snare placement dialed in, I could also sit back on some Jazz stuff and that snare would come across fine as well (the "clank" only came out if you gave it a good smack), not that I did any of that stuff with a group back then (that would be stuff I'd mess with by myself).
Anyway, like I said before, these types of snare drums are still all over the market.
The fact of whether or not they are a "CB-700 snare drum" really doesn't make much difference, because its all the same drum...that is, unless you run across the free floater that Tommy mentioned or a parallel throw-off "Marc" snare drum I mentioned in an earlier post.



Elvis
 

Big Beat

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Some CB700's are better than others. Look for early models with "wristwatch" lugs.
 

galaxy08

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Speaking of which, does anyone know of where I can find a single "wristwatch" lug? My snare is one short.
 

Elvis

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Oh man, this smells of something someone just learned off the net 5 minutes ago, but I'll bite...What's a "wristwatch" lug?



Elvis
 

Beatnik

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I had a concert tom kit of these way back, seem to remember the shells being somewhat paper/fiberboardish and the insides were a wood finish contact paper. These had the wristwatch lugs too.
 

Beatnik

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Picture didn't load and the full editor button doesn't do anything ? Here are the lugs.
 

bzzfkt

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haha! i have a 10x26 remote kick on my set w/ those lugs!! it's chrome over wood and at that size w/ those lugs it looks like a friggin space ship! should've figured that one out! i dig that drum alot...but i'm not a big fan of the metal hoops on that big of a drum....
 

Elvis

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Beatnik,

Thanks for posting the pic.
I see what you guys are referring to now.
-------------------------------------------

Hey BIG BEAT, I don't know where you got the "early" part from, but those lugs are from the 90's!
My old CB-700 kit had the knock-off Rogers Beavertail copy lugs and the Rogers Swivo copy tom mounts on them....just like a lot of generic kits had during that time.
As I said before, just because the snare drum says "CB-700" on it, doesn't make it any more valuable than any other generic drum, unless its a free floater or a "Marc" dual thorw-off drum.



Elvis
 

FloydZKing

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The wristwatch lugs first showed up around 1981 or so. CB700 was already well-established in that niche by the late 70s and went head-to-head with Maxwin (Bruno vs. Pearl) for the lion's share of that pricepoint. The wristwatch lugs came on an upper CB line, sorry can't recall the name - something having to do with "Mark" or "Mach" maybe. They even did a line with veneer finishes at one point.

The shells beatnik refers to were all lauan ply with the inner liner of wood-grained vinyl contact paper.

Elvis referred to Rogers copy lugs and tom mounts, but they were closer to Pearl copies on both counts. To be fair though, the Pearl was a copy of Rogers in the first place.
 

roubaix

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My first "real" drumset was a CB700 in 1981-1982 and I my set had these lugs. It was a cheap set by today's standards but with a set of Evans hydraulic heads around the kit, it sounded GREAT!

I laugh sometimes because even today, I compare what I hear (or try to find) on my set today to what I want it to sound like (my CB's).

The snare was a beast - loud and a sharp crack.

Loved it and I miss my old drums......
 

Big Beat

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Elvis,

not 1990's, more like 1981-82, as mentioned above. 1990's CB lugs looked like this:

View attachment 53956

They are the ones that were on the Internationale series, etc. Lugs from the 1970's were knockoffs of contemporary Pearl lugs.

I had drums from all three eras, with each of the three types of lugs. The drums with the wristwatch lugs were the best, as good as Tama Swingstars of the same era, though Tama had the better tom mount system. CB had Pearl-type arms in the early 80's, but they were much thinner and solid rods instead of pipes. Impossible to find parts for these days.
 

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