CHAPTER 2 : ILU /KETU CANDOMBLE CODES IN JAZZ EVOLUTION HISTORY

bonsritmos

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Here is chapter 2 of my youtube series im making about Ketu Candomble and codes in jazz evolution history , and , its ILU.
ILU is a massivly powerful groove and it contains a lot of secrets and codes that are in black American musical history and evolution . Which has been part of most all American popular music .
By playing it at all tempos, slow it down, lead with the opisite hand , put a back beat on it, it really is a tremendous force. im barely scratching the surface here.
 

bonsritmos

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thanks , camdrums .

in many ways, im just scratching the surface . as well as going back and listening to things i know well in a new differant way , when i hear new things , im hearing these Ketu Candomble codes in them also . like if i listen to some old american banjo styles, bam, there they are , Ketu Candomble codes ( not meaning they studied ketu , but that they share a similar cultural orign ) .
 

bonsritmos

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i apreciete it , even steven


ive actualy taken a show out on the road that featured these rhythms and afro bahian dance and druming , just dancer, percusionist and me on percusion and some drum set .

i dont practice candomble religion , that red bracelet around my neck was a gift from my brother who went to kenya and the necklaces were made for me by my son hahaha
 

"poppies"

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I would love to get a clearer sense of whether these codes are rhythms, accent patterns, or maybe both or somewhere in between.
 

bonsritmos

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poppies

there is really no one else making this connection so i have my own words and expresions to get it across .

so let me try to explain . each Ketu Candomble beat , which is for an Orixai ( diety in the religoin ) , has its groove , the bell actualy is the center , with two drums fortifying it , and a Rum drum as solo, playing set phrases when he choses with individual expresion and to the dancers . it is a groove that starts from the beginning and goes to the end . Ketu Candomble was officialy codified in Brazil near 1850 or so . It was the people who started it, trying to reach out to releigious origins from where they came. Its close to some actual cerimonies in Benin West Africa, but, slavery forced other tribes together , sometimes enemies, so , it is an Afro Brazilian expresion , among many many others . The amazing thing about NACAO KETU CANDOMBLE , among other nations of candomble , for some reason and the roll of the dice , they put together a series of rhythms , that cover a lot of aproaches and evolutions in Black American music.

so what about the ketu codes ? well , the way i see it, black people from west africa in the slave trade , are in many ways the same people that are brought to brazil. exact same no, but , the broad spectrum of west african culture who practice the same concepts with differant out comes. like if you had a slave trade of europe and bunches of differant countries in europe's slaves were thrown together on a far away plantation and the people from differant europe countries with some classical music training would be putting their heads together to recreate the old culture and ways.

so in america, black americans didnt have a codified drum dance religious cerimony they could create, the represion was too great. drums were banned. so it came out in the church, guitar blues, work songs and prison songs, and geechee islands off south carolina preserved slave culture. the black american church actualy mimics the candomble from brazil, vodoun from haiti and santera from cuba , with the holy spirit coming in to possess them and they go to the floor with the feeling etc

so black american musicians coming together in new orleans but i also say in other places too, instead of having these specific codified rhythms for dieties or drum festivals , these deep profound cultural expresions would come out in these outlits that they could do , like music playing marches or juke piano , or buck dancing which master juba turned into tap etc.

and when they would form their expresions, like second line in marches , and rag ,these , what i call codes would come through . im seeing them blatently in Ketu Candomble , so its my personal title to say "Ketu codes". and it is mish mash , like it could be a groove that the whole rhythm section is holding, it could be a phrase while soloing , it could be in a composition and all over the improvisation.

the foundation could be one groove , an opanije feeling one ( they dont think opanije , but it sounds like it) and a soloist can throw in an accent like Ilu.

Joplin would do the A section one way and the B another, Armstrong would be mostly Opanije in Hot Five , but do another groove for an accent or arrangement.

so when i listen now to most all jazz up to brubeck and ornette, im hearing all these references mish mash so i call them Ketu Codes
sorry for the long answer , but i didnt want to give a short answer leave some things uncovered .
 

bonsritmos

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  1. there is an extrodinary thing i discovered at :

    0:17-0:57-1:10 the part that im reffering to the last chapter "Opanije" using James P Johnson as a referance of opanije and at 0:57 , they go into a hard walking bass swing that for me is Bravum.

    if you are like i was before i became aware of these hook ups , and on a gig , whether a restaraunt , wedding, any standards gig, where you start two beat half time when you play the head and at a bridge or solo goes into walking bass splang a lang on the cymbal.

    i used to not love that two beat part, figure im suposed to be floaty , not defined , i just couldnt wait for the walking bass part.

    its amazing doing this youtube because i really am learning as i go and im barely scratching the surface and things just keep opening up in a powerful way to help me think like i havnt thought before.

    so i realised , this whole two beat thing is the tip of the hat to the old style of jazz , mainly louis armstrong , and louis was doing a whole lot of opanije sounding cadences . i knew it was an older style but i didnt hook it up with the whole louis armstrong hot fives aproach, which was the ground breaking record in jazz every one went for.

    and , i dont know when this james p johnson example was recorded, but, these are the earliar cats , and that has to be as solid an example of going from a popular style before into a hard swinging walk. i am so envious of that walk , its so simple and pure and swings so darn hard.

    the half time two beat that you play on the head that goes into swing , is an opanije type cadence going into a bravum like cadence. it should imply if not stated " oom pa oom pa oom rest boom ba boom " , and then go into the walk on the solo or bridge.

    ill never look on it the same again.....all those years not knowing this ......duh
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bonsritmos

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i did copy and paste that from another forum post i made because i didnt want to write the whole thing down again

but check out how james p johnson just dove tails that opanije groove, he is right on it

opanije was definitly one strong cadence that was used in early jazz
 

JazzDrumGuy

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Very interesting...thanks. At times it sounds like 3/2 clave, 2/3 clave and "the Bo Diddley beat".

I came across this concept 25+ years ago after listening to Babatunde Olatunji. You could hear all sorts of old African rhythm patterns that at first seemed very tribal and interesting, but if you broke it down, were found in more modern music.....I just didn't have the technical saavy to take it further, name it or do as much research as you....looking forward to the whole series...thanks!
 

bonsritmos

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jazzdrumguy

you are absolutly correct there are connections to 3/2 clave or 2/3 clave , and Olatunji ( when i was 8 or so my dad got me the first olatunji record ,not drums of passion , but one with a song ill always remember the melody "jolly mensah ") , and american music

there is an incredable interconnection, i consider these ancient african concepts ( not all africa which is a huge continent but from various ethnicities as varied as the pygmies from the congo to the igbo nigeria ) as the fonte. brazil had the largest slave trade , so they have the largest varieties of afro diasporic expresions, including 4 or 5 differant candomble nations and a total branch off from candomble called umbanda. that is just afro brazilian religion.

and just by chance, these ketu candomble concepts are done with sticks, and , they just seem to go over varius black american innovations to american pop music. including even a ballad .

the interesting thing is, the more i make the connections to american music, i can also make the connections to my traditional african drumming records, or youtubes i study. and to the cuba concepts, somebody brought in the jorje alabe youtubes about ketu with bata ( the cuban name for their religious drumming, in ketu , there is a specific beat called bata, the beat that can go with ballads) , and it was definitly in there.
 

bonsritmos

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i really apreciete your interest. i am starting the next chapter now ( in isolation relaying it to the video editor , i filmed and recorded most of it before lockdown) , it will be BRAVUM , that is the groove for the whole swing era , until ornette and dave brubeck introduced their innovations , in jazz, because it kept going in blues and actualy surfaced in black american popular music with the washington dc gogo movement that morphed into the jack swing movement.

i think there will be about 3 more chapters, and then ill put them all together in one youtube
 


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