Cheap double pedal

MrYikes

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 5, 2014
Messages
305
Reaction score
268
Location
Gnaw Bone, Indiana
short story: I tried to buy these pedals for $37, but the seller on ebay backed out, so I bought them from a different name on ebay for $57. They came in yesterday.
Here they are on my Rogers kit. I put them on, then took them off and spent 3 hours lubricating everywhere I thought it needed it, though I did not take it apart to see if they had bearings or bushings(I may do that today). I like that they put a lock washer under the lock nut on the spring tension adjuster. I put a cut wine cork under the hoop hasp on the left pedal to make sure it would not rattle. I did not install the third beater they sent because I don't have any more legs nor any idea why they would send three beaters. I use the felt side of the beater on my right foot and the plastic side for my left foot to try to even the volume since my left foot is so much weaker than my right. These pedals have an aggressive rubber plate on the bottom to help hold them which has worked for me so far (they also have twin anchor screws on each pedal if a person wanted to use those). I practiced for an hour yesterday and another hour this morning. That's about all I can do at a time right now before my left leg starts yelling at me (doing 16ths at 100bpm). Later today, I will play along with some old band music to see if I can fit this new pedal in at various places
.
Figuring out where to place the left pedal is awkward. I need to see how others did it, to maybe open my mind on possibilities.

It is my hope that these pedals break in sooner than later. Right now both pedals are sluggish, though the right is easier. I have the spring tension as light as it can go but they are still not easy. I will update this thread when things change.

$57 for a new double pedal is cheap by anyone's standards and this is a heavy duty double chain drive pedal. The weak points I have noticed so far are the heel pivot attaching rivets are not strong enough and will probably fail first, the design of the right pedal causes the chain to leave the beater at an angle which will wear down the cam prematurely and bend the heel rivets, there are a lot screws turned with a drum key some of which will get lost eventually (a person should have extras on hand), the foot boards are rough cut (you will never be able to smoothly slide your foot anywhere, your foot will stay where you put it), a person could easily change this to a strap drive but I don't know if that right pedal might have a problem long term because of the angle. You can buy on ebay for $7 a complete spring tension assembly, I would advise doing that to have a spare on hand. The problems I have noted will occur within 2 years for a person playing 6 nights a week.

I have never played a double pedal and this is fun to practice and fun to try a shuffle beat. More possibilities will open the more I try it.
dblPedal 009.JPG
 

lrod1707

DFO Master
Joined
Aug 12, 2018
Messages
3,822
Reaction score
1,942
Location
Florida
short story: I tried to buy these pedals for $37, but the seller on ebay backed out, so I bought them from a different name on ebay for $57. They came in yesterday.
Here they are on my Rogers kit. I put them on, then took them off and spent 3 hours lubricating everywhere I thought it needed it, though I did not take it apart to see if they had bearings or bushings(I may do that today). I like that they put a lock washer under the lock nut on the spring tension adjuster. I put a cut wine cork under the hoop hasp on the left pedal to make sure it would not rattle. I did not install the third beater they sent because I don't have any more legs nor any idea why they would send three beaters. I use the felt side of the beater on my right foot and the plastic side for my left foot to try to even the volume since my left foot is so much weaker than my right. These pedals have an aggressive rubber plate on the bottom to help hold them which has worked for me so far (they also have twin anchor screws on each pedal if a person wanted to use those). I practiced for an hour yesterday and another hour this morning. That's about all I can do at a time right now before my left leg starts yelling at me (doing 16ths at 100bpm). Later today, I will play along with some old band music to see if I can fit this new pedal in at various places
.
Figuring out where to place the left pedal is awkward. I need to see how others did it, to maybe open my mind on possibilities.

It is my hope that these pedals break in sooner than later. Right now both pedals are sluggish, though the right is easier. I have the spring tension as light as it can go but they are still not easy. I will update this thread when things change.

$57 for a new double pedal is cheap by anyone's standards and this is a heavy duty double chain drive pedal. The weak points I have noticed so far are the heel pivot attaching rivets are not strong enough and will probably fail first, the design of the right pedal causes the chain to leave the beater at an angle which will wear down the cam prematurely and bend the heel rivets, there are a lot screws turned with a drum key some of which will get lost eventually (a person should have extras on hand), the foot boards are rough cut (you will never be able to smoothly slide your foot anywhere, your foot will stay where you put it), a person could easily change this to a strap drive but I don't know if that right pedal might have a problem long term because of the angle. You can buy on ebay for $7 a complete spring tension assembly, I would advise doing that to have a spare on hand. The problems I have noted will occur within 2 years for a person playing 6 nights a week.

I have never played a double pedal and this is fun to practice and fun to try a shuffle beat. More possibilities will open the more I try it.
I was looking forward to seeing how that 3rd. beater works since the first time you posted about these pedals, LOL!! Oh well!
It's like you said though, you'd need 3 feet!
About the placement:
If you look on both ends of the shaft, you have a bolt (or 2) that you loosen with a drum key. Stretch out that shaft a bit that way the pedals are farther apart from each other. They look a bit close to each other. Your snare stand should fit comfortably between the two pedals and the separation will give your legs a more relaxed & natural posture when you play. Right now it looks as if the stand is squeezed between the pedals. You shouldn't have to go looking for the left pedal behind the snare stand when you play. I usually keep my hi hat pedal almost perfectly aligned with the left bass pedal. It's hard to do though with a hi hat stand that doesn't have rotating legs. This is usually the main problem when positioning double pedals; Intertwining the left pedal with the hi hat stand legs. Other than that, it looks fine! Just play around with the placement (after you stretch that shaft a bit) till it feels natural.
Have fun!
 
Last edited:

Deafmoon

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 26, 2014
Messages
167
Reaction score
109
Location
New York
Hey use it to the best of its ability and when it goes, get yourself a nicer double pedal and you’ll be surprised at your progress. The hope in buying inexpensive equipment is you learn on it til it no longer can meet your ability or breaks it you decide it’s not for you. I started with a Japan Top Pedal and in a year went to a Speed King which was a dream to play til I discovered Camco and later DW. I played a DW double pedal for awhile, but I found I was cheating on where I wanted my right foot to be. So I went back to one pedal. Today I use a Pearl Redline with a VF Erskine Wood Shaft felt Beater. I love it.
 


Top