Complete Newb question

bpaluzzi

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You can post edit? If you use large toms, or 2 FTs, you can hear the 2nd just as well as the 1st?
What if you want to split screen? Or talk?
I've heard several, and only 4 piece kits have sounded good.
Could you post a vid?
You're conflating some stuff here -- the Rec N Share app is absolute garbage -- I agree with you there.

I'm saying the actual EAD10 hardware is great. You can use the EAD10 as an input for any DAW. I haven't had any issues with tom sizes or kit sizes (up to a 2-up / 2-down configuration -- with a 3-up config, that small tom on the far left does get lost. With two floor toms, my second drum is usually an 18", which puts out a LOT of sound, so that makes sure it can be heard).

As for fixing in post -- if you're using spot mics, you can adjust relative volumes, and do things like apply different signal chains to different drums. But you still can't really fix "mistakes" easily -- everything in the spot mics is also being caught by the overheads You can usually punch-in and record an entirely new version of a section (depending on things like cymbal ring), but you can do that with the EAD10 running into a DAW as well.

It really comes down to what kind of recording aesthetic do you want -- are you looking for an "in the room" drum sound? If so, the EAD10 will work great for that. Alternatives to that would be any of the 2- or 3-mic drum methods (Glyn Johns, Recorder Man, etc.). That's going to be a very different sound than a more produced "every drum gets a spot mic". But that's not due to any shortcomings in the EAD10, they're just very different types of recordings.

I actually use the EAD10 even when I _am_ doing a full multi-mic rig -- I'll either leave it natural and use it as my "fat mic", or I'll compress / distort it and use it as my trash track. Mixing it in under the "clean" multi-mic sounds can add a nice bit of growl to a modern track.
 

Toast Tee

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You're conflating some stuff here -- the Rec N Share app is absolute garbage -- I agree with you there.

I'm saying the actual EAD10 hardware is great. You can use the EAD10 as an input for any DAW. I haven't had any issues with tom sizes or kit sizes (up to a 2-up / 2-down configuration -- with a 3-up config, that small tom on the far left does get lost. With two floor toms, my second drum is usually an 18", which puts out a LOT of sound, so that makes sure it can be heard).

As for fixing in post -- if you're using spot mics, you can adjust relative volumes, and do things like apply different signal chains to different drums. But you still can't really fix "mistakes" easily -- everything in the spot mics is also being caught by the overheads You can usually punch-in and record an entirely new version of a section (depending on things like cymbal ring), but you can do that with the EAD10 running into a DAW as well.

It really comes down to what kind of recording aesthetic do you want -- are you looking for an "in the room" drum sound? If so, the EAD10 will work great for that. Alternatives to that would be any of the 2- or 3-mic drum methods (Glyn Johns, Recorder Man, etc.). That's going to be a very different sound than a more produced "every drum gets a spot mic". But that's not due to any shortcomings in the EAD10, they're just very different types of recordings.

I actually use the EAD10 even when I _am_ doing a full multi-mic rig -- I'll either leave it natural and use it as my "fat mic", or I'll compress / distort it and use it as my trash track. Mixing it in under the "clean" multi-mic sounds can add a nice bit of growl to a modern track.
I agree with just about everything you said.
I used to close mic, and run it through the Tascam Model 24.
When i did it that way, i was able to hear everything much better, and my recordings came out better.
I left the mics on, but in those vids didn't use em.
I never did run it to the pc, am i just now learning to use DAW.
If only using the stereo mic , how would i adjust separate tracks/drums? I mean i can record into the Tascam, and do it to the SD card.
I was just talking about the unit as is, and not micing anything else.
So yeah, i see where your coming from. Once I'm proficient with my DAW, I'll give it another shot
 

bpaluzzi

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If only using the stereo mic , how would i adjust separate tracks/drums? I mean i can record into the Tascam, and do it to the SD card.
Yeah, if you're just running stereo mics, you won't be able to adjust levels after the fact -- that's the same if you're using EAD10, Recorderman, Glyn Johns, etc. It's one of the shortcomings of that kind of recording, but it does force you to develop your performance skills. It's like the old Motown recordings where everyone was in one room recording. If _anyone_ messed up, that whole take was ruined. I definitely couldn't deal with that level of pressure! :D
 

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I will say this.
Using the EAD, and trying to use Rec n Share w/out a click really helped my time.
I wouldn't do anything over. I'm not saying I'm a good drummer, but my time, and accuracy definitely got much better.
Now when I get the pleasure of playing to a click, i rarely lose it. I actually don't even hear it anymore. That will be a huge help going forward.
 

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Yeah, if you're just running stereo mics, you won't be able to adjust levels after the fact -- that's the same if you're using EAD10, Recorderman, Glyn Johns, etc. It's one of the shortcomings of that kind of recording, but it does force you to develop your performance skills. It's like the old Motown recordings where everyone was in one room recording. If _anyone_ messed up, that whole take was ruined. I definitely couldn't deal with that level of pressure! :D
Hey bpal, I went back to the EAD, hooked up the RCA outs, to the RCA ins on the Tascam. I used only the stereo channels (there are still pleanty) I turned the trigger off, and closed micd the kit, including 2 overheads. I had the Bluetooth channel on as well as all the PFL's.
I was able to get the audio of my kit, as well as video, and it sounds great!
It was approaching 10 (turn off the drums, or the cops may come time). I'd post what I recorded, but I didn't have the volume up high enough.
I'm psyched! I was about to give up on the thing.
I took pics of how i had/have everything set.
Anyway, I'm still working with my Focusrite, and Abelton, and pretty much have that figured out well enough to record.
For the EAD, I just have to get the drumless tracks to play with my playing, and that's gotta be the easiest way to get a solid recording..
With the Abelton, I'm starting to see using DAW is almost like cheating. Well, there are several ways to "cheat".
I bet i could connect the EAD to the Tascam, to the Focusrite to pc for extra tracks.
Anyway, thanks for peaking my curiosity on the ead again!
 


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