Complete newbie to electronic drums. Start up help?

nmosko

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 10, 2018
Messages
405
Reaction score
147
Location
Bluefield, VA
Hey everyone! Been an acoustic guy for close to 2 decades but I’ve really started to become interested in electronic drums. Basically, I just want to know if my line of thinking here is correct. In order to trigger my acoustic set I would need to do the following:

-purchase 4 triggers (ddrum, Roland, etc.) for each of my 4 drums.
- purchase a module that has at least 4 inputs.
- plug the triggers into the module along with headphones.
- bam! I can play my drums and hear the sounds from the module whenever I hit my drums with the triggers.

I’m not interested in taking any electronics out of the house. At least not yet. I just want to be able to play at home with all of the cool electronic sounds. Maybe even put mesh heads on my acoustic kit in order to mute the shells.

is setting up an electronic component as simple as I’m making it out? Or is there a lot of other pieces and factors I’m completely missing?

thanks you all SO MUCH!!!!
 

electrodrummer

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 14, 2016
Messages
117
Reaction score
39
Location
London
-purchase 4 triggers (ddrum, Roland, etc.) for each of my 4 drums.
- purchase a module that has at least 4 inputs.
- plug the triggers into the module along with headphones.
- bam! I can play my drums and hear the sounds from the module whenever I hit my drums with the triggers.
Basically, yes.

triggers are generally just £1/$1 piezos.

Stick those on anything - even a brick - and when they pick up a vibe a voltage is generated.

The module picks up the voltage and fires a sound.

and/OR

You could just buy a Yamaha EAD10 if you wanna play with electronics. Use that as an electro/acoustic crossover. Mics to pick up and process acoustic sounds, with trigger inputs to fire off any other sound you like.
 

nmosko

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 10, 2018
Messages
405
Reaction score
147
Location
Bluefield, VA
Basically, yes.

triggers are generally just £1/$1 piezos.

Stick those on anything - even a brick - and when they pick up a vibe a voltage is generated.

The module picks up the voltage and fires a sound.

and/OR

You could just buy a Yamaha EAD10 if you wanna play with electronics. Use that as an electro/acoustic crossover. Mics to pick up and process acoustic sounds, with trigger inputs to fire off any other sound you like.
honestly, and this may sound silly, but the option with triggers going into a module sounds like the simplest thing and is much more my speed.

I’ve never heard of the Yamaha ead10 so I’m going to google that and see what’s what with it. Thanks a ton for your help dude!
 

dboomer

Very well Known Member
Joined
Jan 3, 2011
Messages
953
Reaction score
295
Location
Visalia CA

lrod1707

DFO Master
Joined
Aug 12, 2018
Messages
3,469
Reaction score
1,614
Location
Florida
I've got an Alesis samplepad on my acoustic kit.
I had no clue when I first installed it!
I've only got 1 trigger that's on my side snare. I hook it up to the trigger port of the Alesis. Then I can assign any sound to it. When I hit it, I hear that sound (thru headphones or my personal monitor). From what I read, this is what you want to do x4 correct?
So your list is correct:
4 triggers
4 cables
1 module (with 4 trigger ports)
Hook it all up, assign the sounds you want to hear per trigger and adjust the sensitivity and your in business!

If you just want to play around and not spend much:
Ddrum or Simmons triggers are $19 a piece
(I've got the Simmons and have never tried the others)
Roland are $$$
4 cables should be around $40 total (buy a multipack to spend less)
The module is what costs most. Shop around because prices fluctuate and you have many choices.
Good luck!
 

cochlea

DFO Veteran
Joined
Aug 15, 2005
Messages
2,231
Reaction score
554
Location
Western New York
Adding triggers to acoustic drums is a fairly simple process, especially for use at home. However, you make no mention of cymbals in your post so I assume you are going to continue to use acoustic cymbals with your triggered drums. If so, there may be an issue with the volume and clarity of your cymbals compared to the triggered sounds from your drums, assuming you are using headphones and the degree of attenuation they provide. The triggered sounds will be coming through your headphones and although you can adjust the volume of these sounds coming from the module, I would think that the sounds of your acoustic cymbals will sound somewhat muffled because they're being attenuated by your headphones. You can't control them through the module. Maybe this isn't a big deal for home practice but I'd prefer to control over the entire mix coming into my headphones. That's why the Yamaha EAD10 might be a better choice. It's a drum micing system that sends everything (drums, cymbals, percussion) through a a small module to your headphones. There are different effects built into the module that can make your drums sound huge, although some of these effects are a bit "out there" for my taste. The EAD10 also lets you record your drums, either alone or on top of a backing track of your choice.
 

S. Chalker

New Member
Joined
Jul 28, 2020
Messages
1
Reaction score
0
I use piezos and sanding sponges trimmed down secured by very strong foam tape, for the trigger. Works very well. I fabricated the cross bars to fit inside the acoustic drum out of u channel aluminum.
 

nk126

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 18, 2017
Messages
331
Reaction score
62
Location
oakland ca
As a guy who's tried to cobble together several "low cost" electronic kits over the years (as opposed to just paying a little extra for something designed to work out of the box), here's my $.02 ...

As others said, the Yamaha EAD10 might be your easiest path to happiness. It's built to do what you want to do, and then some, with minimal fuss. Also, as already said, it can deal with cymbals. E-Cymbals are no doubt much better now than the last time I messed with them, but they're kind of a pain if you're expecting any sort of "real feel" (unless you want to shell out $$$).

If you've already got a laptop you can use with this project, an Alesis Trigger IO is a super low-cost way to connect your triggers to your computer, and use your computer as your electronic drum brain. Triggers plug into the 1/4" jacks on the IO, IO plugs into your laptop via USB, and you run whatever software you want on the laptop to make noise (so long as it can handle MIDI). I think it's a discontinued product, but they're easy to find used or new old stock. IMO, a laptop as drum brain (module) is cool bc it's more flexible re: loading samples, triggering synths and other software instruments, etc.

This is probably a little off-topic, but ... You could also go cutting edge and check out Sensory Percussion which, frankly, I'd really love to screw around with myself.
 


Top