Contemporary drum solos have changed... but I can't put my thumb on it

rondrums51

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Double bass pedal; electronic drum pad; zero dynamics, nothing but loud; the bass drum sounds like someone hitting a plastic bag. But he has good chops and good 8th note / 16th note syncopation.

I respect the guy for what he does. He's obviously worked hard to get where he is.

But I miss the real sound of acoustic drums and the finesse and nuance of the great jazz drummers. Rock drummers, too. I saw Ed Cassidy with Spirit way back in the day, and he played a great solo with brushes and mallets and drew all kinds of beautiful sounds out of his drums.

Things have changed, due to loud amplification and media influence. And straight 8th music is the norm nowadays.

Not passing judgement or saying "Get off my lawn." These new guys can play. It's just a whole different ball game.
 

Nacci

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I don’t know anything about this guy but I’m going to guess he comes from a gospel genesis.

When I was in my late teens I met a fellow who was also a drummer, Cuban kid and he was immersed in the gospel culture.

He invited me over to his house to play and he just killed the kit, same age as me but so far ahead of me skill, speed, chops wise.

His playing style had a lot of echos of what I just watched here, there is a commonality amongst Gospel drummers. That double hi hat work, the cross overs, the dragging syncopation followed up by blazing fills.

I used to spend some time with him at his church. The place was full of young drummers, all of them way better then me. The church had one kit and for many of these kids it was the only one they could play. It was a competition for kit time. It was very visual playing. They were always trying to cut and one up each other. That type of dead serious competition to get in on that kit or be able to back the choir is a real part of what makes so many of these gospel guys so good.
 

JazzDrumGuy

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I don't think you can compare the first guy and Eric Harland. Never heard of the first guy and I am sure a ton of others have similar amazing chops/skills (I'm not worth of even holding their stick bags!), but Harland is the bomb! Not just saying this because he is a jazz guy (disclaimer: I have seen him 3-4X, met him many times, chilled with him & the band).

Eric, too, comes from a gospel chops backround, but he has musicality as well as amazing chops. He shows restraint, melody and tasteful playing that's not over the top, doesn't detract from the music, and at least keeps me very interested and on the edge of my seat. The first guy, 30 seconds into it, I knew he was very good, but neither the sound nor playing was enough to keep me interested, let alone the music. I bet there are 50 other amazing younger guys like him - Aaron Spears, Chris Coleman, etc. But there are only a few top notch younger jazz guys out there that are the top of the pyramid - Eric, Blade, Hutch, Giuliana, etc.

What I do see in the jazz context is that there is little traditional swinging jazz playing and soloing. Some guys do electronics, but for the most part, I think a lot of the new jazz drumming, even if sounding traditional (piano, bass, guitar, horns), has a huge hip hip, rap, gospel and modern feel. I am not sure I like it versus the older stuff, but that's the beauty of the genre - and the direction it is going in the future.
 

makinao

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I’ve seen this happening this past decade, with Vinny, rap, gospel, r&b, and jazz drumming cross-pollinating. What fascinates me most are the “cross-feel” if not cross-rhythm parts. Chris Dave, Mark Collenberg, Justin Tyson, and a host of others are doing this.

 
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REF

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Not my taste in music but, I agree with the 'Gospel Chops' observation. Lots of linear double strokes between hands and feet. That's twenty plus years of that style now. I have read that many GC stylists credit Vinnie for that influence.

When I was young solos were more about flow and a beginning, middle, and end approach. The soloist created a landscape. Today it's more about technical approach to note placement and time-scaping, messing around with it, and Vinnie definitely brought that about. Dave Weckl, as well. I call these guys the Mathematicians. Virgil, Thomas Lang, Marco, Dennis, though he seems to be able to do it without even thinking about it. They're like drumming magicians. Guys like Gergo Borlai and Damien Schmitt have taken it to new levels of mind boggling speeds and accuracy.

I should mention Lee Pearson. Not only a mix of jazz, gospel chops, landscape, timescape, and all but, fabulous entertainer with his solos as well.
 

Mongrel

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I threw up in my mouth at the 27 second mark, fast forwarded to the 3:00 minute mark, hung on to the end of the drum...sol....shenanigans and shut it down.

Nothing of interest to me at all...well, I will say he has a killer right foot, but other than that...

If it had not been posted here I would not have listened past the first vocal line.
 

CherryClassic

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Thought it kind of funny you would bring up this subject. When I was a young brat just out of High School in 1964, I went to a number of drum clinics and most of them were Rock N Roll greats. But when they sat down to show off there chops I was surprised to hear a great Jazz drummer in the feeling of their grove. And I really enjoyed the shows. The jazz drummers had a way to sneak in or transition to a different beat without you hardly realizing what they were doing, then return to the original rhythm.

With a Jazz band the great Jazz drummers back then would do that when they started a solo with a the music; they would go to never never land then return and the band would come back and finish the song.

When I thought about it I felt like these guys are really Jazz drummers making more money playing Rock N Roll. All the really known greats had that venue sewed up.

Yes, I think over the years the drum solo as we call it has changed, the feel seems to be different. I'm not saying there bad it's just some drummers are better at it than others and personally I like the old style better.

sherm
 

bongomania

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The 3:00 solo reminded me of a somewhat extended version of the mini-solos we do when trading twos or fours in a jazz band. In those you aren't expected to tell a story arc, you're just expressing something you feel in the moment, referencing the melody hook, or playing off each other's riffs. He basically strung together several bars of that kind of riff playing.

In a way it reflects modern music production overall, where sound sources are gathered as files, cut up and rearranged. This deprecates the old emphasis on a "song", where a story is set to a melody, and everything else is just there to carry or mirror the song. I'm not saying all old music is one way and all new music is another way; just saying the mindset may be different these days overall, with less assumptions about what the form of a tune or a solo are supposed to be, and more putting pieces together in interesting ways.
 

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