Curious about Jesse Simpson originals

slcdrummer

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Hi all!
I’m posting here because I’m curious about Jesse Simpson’s rides. I know his modifications are fantastic but I was wondering if anyone here has experience with his original creations, particularly 22” rides? I’m restless with my 22”s and am thinking of doing something different.

Thanks in advance for any impressions!!
 

slcdrummer

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Very cool! Thanks for the response Mike. How would you characterize the volume of it? Does it project well compared to mass produced cymbals? Thanks again!!


I have one of the very first 22" rides that Jesse hammered .....

Still love it .......!

Mike
 

drumgadget

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First of all, it is a jazz cymbal ..... not the thinnest or lightest 22" I've played, but it has a "soft" stick feel and some edge wobble. It is very dark - low in pitch with a hint of trash ...... but the stick is clear and defined and "rises" out of a shoulder crash very nicely.

But the nature of your question makes me wonder what your application might be ....... "volume" per se is not something I think about much ..... except in the inverse sense ie how controllable is the cymbal? Does it "wash up" really easily? Does the stick definition predominate? But then, I am a jazzer ........

I would not think for a moment about using this cymbal on a rock or pop gig (except maybe as a gigantic trashy crash for FX ...... !). Even a jazz big band would be better served by a pingier, higher-pitched ride. But the thing about "boutique" cymbalsmiths like Jesse ( or Matt Bettis, or Lauritsen, or Ottaviano etc etc) is that they can make anything you want ....... it's just a "simple" matter of weight, alloy, profile, lathing (or lack of it), and hammering.

Like I said ........ simple ........ Just start a conversation with your local cymbalsmith!

Mike

PS: I should have added: Jesse Simpson is a very nice person to deal with, and he is one heck of a great jazz drummer!
 

slcdrummer

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First of all, it is a jazz cymbal ..... not the thinnest or lightest 22" I've played, but it has a "soft" stick feel and some edge wobble. It is very dark - low in pitch with a hint of trash ...... but the stick is clear and defined and "rises" out of a shoulder crash very nicely.

But the nature of your question makes me wonder what your application might be ....... "volume" per se is not something I think about much ..... except in the inverse sense ie how controllable is the cymbal? Does it "wash up" really easily? Does the stick definition predominate? But then, I am a jazzer ........

I would not think for a moment about using this cymbal on a rock or pop gig (except maybe as a gigantic trashy crash for FX ...... !). Even a jazz big band would be better served by a pingier, higher-pitched ride. But the thing about "boutique" cymbalsmiths like Jesse ( or Matt Bettis, or Lauritsen, or Ottaviano etc etc) is that they can make anything you want ....... it's just a "simple" matter of weight, alloy, profile, lathing (or lack of it), and hammering.

Like I said ........ simple ........ Just start a conversation with your local cymbalsmith!

Mike

PS: I should have added: Jesse Simpson is a very nice person to deal with, and he is one heck of a great jazz drummer!
Hey Mike wow thank you so much for the very detailed and informative answer, it is much appreciated!

I’m a jazz guy too and this hypothetical ride would be for jazz situations for sure. I get a little hung up on rides being able to cut through well enough, I guess maybe it’s not as much so “volume” but maybe more like high frequencies that cut well in acoustic music. But like for instance, from my individual point of view, I absolutely love the sound of some Bosphorus and Istanbul agop cymbals and other handmade ones that I have played. Sometimes though when the energy and volume got pretty high on gigs I found myself slamming the cymbal trying to get enough sound out of it.

Usually the zildjian rides I’ve played (k con, old A, and my limited old K experiences) cut through and project nicely so I don’t have to play too hard. I would love to get a 22” k Istanbul one day but I’m thinking a Jesse Simpson ride would be really cool and a bit more affordable. From what you described it sounds like it could be what I’m looking for! Have loved everything I heard online but I appreciate getting your first-hand account.

P.S. This is just from my limited experience and I know that there are amazing drummers playing every different brand and getting great sounds out of them. And also even within brands there’s a lot of variety in factors like projection and high-end.

Anyway thanks again Mike!!!

Parker
 

curly

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Hi all!
I’m posting here because I’m curious about Jesse Simpson’s rides. I know his modifications are fantastic but I was wondering if anyone here has experience with his original creations, particularly 22” rides? I’m restless with my 22”s and am thinking of doing something different.

Thanks in advance for any impressions!!
Slcdrummer, Jesse's cymbals are wonderful. If you are looking for a particular sound, he's great to work with.

I have a 3 of his original works, a 20 sizzle that is a old K clone, a 22 sizzle, and a 23.5. All thin, all gorgeous, all unique. The top of the 22 and 23.5 are buffed like some of Zildjian trans stamps and seems to add bit more stick and shimmer. The 22 is one of my favorite cymbals ever and rarely leaves the stand. Its become kind of a skeleton key for me. When I have 23-24 in on the right, its always on the left, can be the main ride, or far left ala Brian Blade.

Here's all 3.

Here's Jesse's video of the 22:
 

slcdrummer

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Slcdrummer, Jesse's cymbals are wonderful. If you are looking for a particular sound, he's great to work with.

I have a 3 of his original works, a 20 sizzle that is a old K clone, a 22 sizzle, and a 23.5. All thin, all gorgeous, all unique. The top of the 22 and 23.5 are buffed like some of Zildjian trans stamps and seems to add bit more stick and shimmer. The 22 is one of my favorite cymbals ever and rarely leaves the stand. Its become kind of a skeleton key for me. When I have 23-24 in on the right, its always on the left, can be the main ride, or far left ala Brian Blade.

Here's all 3.

Here's Jesse's video of the 22:
Hey Curly,

wow your cymbals sound amazing and I think they complement each other really well! Thanks so much for sharing. This is hyping me up a little bit. Love the buffed finish too.
 

SaranacJack

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I just ordered a small bikini kit set that arrived, 14” hats and 18” crash ride. Not a 22” as is being discussed here, but Jesse is FANTASTIC to work with, and his craftsmanship is inspiring. I sent him a few YouTube videos of the sound I was going after and he nailed it. I’d recommend his work to anyone.
 

slcdrummer

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I just ordered a small bikini kit set that arrived, 14” hats and 18” crash ride. Not a 22” as is being discussed here, but Jesse is FANTASTIC to work with, and his craftsmanship is inspiring. I sent him a few YouTube videos of the sound I was going after and he nailed it. I’d recommend his work to anyone.
Awesome, thanks for the recommendation. Congrats on the new cymbals! I love a good 18”
 

Old Drummer

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I have a Simpson mod and have no complaints. To the question of volume, at least for a mod, Jesse can make a loud cymbal. Mine is. I gather he usually gets requests for quieter, thinner cymbals, but based on the one I have, that's not all he can do. Volume isn't a concern.

But I do have a question about commissioning him or another smith to make a new cymbal. Why not go to Sabian's Custom Shop and have them make the cymbal for you? I have no experience with Sabian's Custom Shop, but the price seems about the same as Jesse charges and I'd guess that the people at Sabian know how to make cymbals.

This is honestly a question, not a plug for Sabian or a criticism of any independent smith.
 

JimmySticks

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I took an old Kashian 18" to him for some mods and he did a great job. While I was there he had a few 20" rides that I really loved but I wasn't ready to buy, but he is on my radar when I am.

His shop is pretty simple and located in a deep basement of an old tenement in Brooklyn. It has a very cool vibe to it though and it seems perfect for an up and coming cymbal smith. As others here have said, he is a super nice young man.
 

slcdrummer

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I have a Simpson mod and have no complaints. To the question of volume, at least for a mod, Jesse can make a loud cymbal. Mine is. I gather he usually gets requests for quieter, thinner cymbals, but based on the one I have, that's not all he can do. Volume isn't a concern.

But I do have a question about commissioning him or another smith to make a new cymbal. Why not go to Sabian's Custom Shop and have them make the cymbal for you? I have no experience with Sabian's Custom Shop, but the price seems about the same as Jesse charges and I'd guess that the people at Sabian know how to make cymbals.

This is honestly a question, not a plug for Sabian or a criticism of any independent smith.
Good to know, thanks for your input. Aesthetically I think I’d rather get a cymbal particularly from Jesse even though I think the Sabian is another great option! Something to think about for sure.
 

slcdrummer

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I took an old Kashian 18" to him for some mods and he did a great job. While I was there he had a few 20" rides that I really loved but I wasn't ready to buy, but he is on my radar when I am.

His shop is pretty simple and located in a deep basement of an old tenement in Brooklyn. It has a very cool vibe to it though and it seems perfect for an up and coming cymbal smith. As others here have said, he is a super nice young man.
Thanks for your input!! You guys are really nudging me towards doing this. Getting excited
 

owr

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Dang it Curly, those buffed trans stamps are my weak spot, now I need to pay more attention to Jesse’s cymbals.

And congrats on owning some of the best sleeper hats around.

Slcdrummer, Jesse's cymbals are wonderful. If you are looking for a particular sound, he's great to work with.

I have a 3 of his original works, a 20 sizzle that is a old K clone, a 22 sizzle, and a 23.5. All thin, all gorgeous, all unique. The top of the 22 and 23.5 are buffed like some of Zildjian trans stamps and seems to add bit more stick and shimmer. The 22 is one of my favorite cymbals ever and rarely leaves the stand. Its become kind of a skeleton key for me. When I have 23-24 in on the right, its always on the left, can be the main ride, or far left ala Brian Blade.

Here's all 3.

Here's Jesse's video of the 22:
 

curly

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Hey Curly,

wow your cymbals sound amazing and I think they complement each other really well! Thanks so much for sharing. This is hyping me up a little bit. Love the buffed finish too.
Thanks! I got lucky with how well these work together. Bought the 22 first, then bought the 23.5 off reverb without sounds, and then got the 20 last. But yea, I agree, they are at really nice intervals and blend well.
 

curly

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Dang it Curly, those buffed trans stamps are my weak spot, now I need to pay more attention to Jesse’s cymbals.

And congrats on owning some of the best sleeper hats around.
Hah, yea. If I was going to have a buffed trans stamp style cymbal made I'd go to Jesse or Matt Nolan probably.

Yes, the hats! First run of the HH Manhattan Groove Hats. I got these years ago after Mr. Acrolite raved about them. Many other pairs of hats have passed through since, but these, they just work.
 

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Good to know, thanks for your input. Aesthetically I think I’d rather get a cymbal particularly from Jesse even though I think the Sabian is another great option! Something to think about for sure.

Hey slcdrummer ....... (are you in Salt Lake City?)

Much as I respect Sabian ....... I say *support your local cymbalsmith* ....... even if he/she is not exactly "local". These folks are small business persons and deserve our help, especially in these weird times of no gigs and uncertain future for any entrepreneur .............

Mike

U of Utah grad school 1966 - '68
 

slcdrummer

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Hey slcdrummer ....... (are you in Salt Lake City?)

Much as I respect Sabian ....... I say *support your local cymbalsmith* ....... even if he/she is not exactly "local". These folks are small business persons and deserve our help, especially in these weird times of no gigs and uncertain future for any entrepreneur .............

Mike

U of Utah grad school 1966 - '68
Yeah Mike! I’m in Salt Lake and fellow U of U alum! Very cool. I think you’re right. I’m gonna email Jesse today!
 

Markkuliini

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Very cool! Thanks for the response Mike. How would you characterize the volume of it? Does it project well compared to mass produced cymbals? Thanks again!!

About the volume: I haven't played a Simpson, but I have noticed a clear difference between handmade cymbals compared to let's say Zildjians.
My Funches and (former Lauritsen) have somewhat lower volume than the Zildjians I played before. On most cases it's a good thing but on louder rock gigs it might not be.
The reason that hand made cymbals have lower volume headroom is that (big) factory made cymbals are pressed into a shape, even Z Constantinoples, and then they are hammered little bit afterwards, where as handmade cymbals are hammered all the way from flat form into an arch.
That amount of hammering also darkens the sound, so that often makes these cymbals not-so-loud.
The pressing gets the cymbal into quite high tension and that helps it to get loud. I think it's almost impossible to get a handmade cymbal as loud as pressed.
Also, independent smiths often prefer smaller and flatter bells that make the cymbal bit more quiet and controlled, they don't have as trebly and loud wash.

My big bell'd 20" Funch that's smoothly hammered like a vintage A, can get quite loud actually, but still not quite as loud as a 20" A crash. You can feel that it's not as tense as factory pies.
 

slcdrummer

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About the volume: I haven't played a Simpson, but I have noticed a clear difference between handmade cymbals compared to let's say Zildjians.
My Funches and (former Lauritsen) have somewhat lower volume than the Zildjians I played before. On most cases it's a good thing but on louder rock gigs it might not be.
The reason that hand made cymbals have lower volume headroom is that (big) factory made cymbals are pressed into a shape, even Z Constantinoples, and then they are hammered little bit afterwards, where as handmade cymbals are hammered all the way from flat form into an arch.
That amount of hammering also darkens the sound, so that often makes these cymbals not-so-loud.
The pressing gets the cymbal into quite high tension and that helps it to get loud. I think it's almost impossible to get a handmade cymbal as loud as pressed.
Also, independent smiths often prefer smaller and flatter bells that make the cymbal bit more quiet and controlled, they don't have as trebly and loud wash.

My big bell'd 20" Funch that's smoothly hammered like a vintage A, can get quite loud actually, but still not quite as loud as a 20" A crash. You can feel that it's not as tense as factory pies.
Hey Markku, wow yeah that makes a lot of sense. Definitely illuminating, I knew the process would make a difference but I hadn’t considered the relation between pressing, tension, and volume. That is very helpful. Maybe I can find some happy medium like you described on your big bell A style Funch. I’ve checked out a lot of your videos and you and your cymbals sound fantastic. I have a 20” Lauritsen, one of my best cymbals that is amazing but pretty quiet. My New Stamp 20” K projects pretty well but it is a polished 2088g with a pretty big bell.

I’m thinking I’m gonna go for it and try to get a 22” from Jesse and see how it goes. Thanks a bunch for your insights.
 


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