Cutting a shell this way???

JazzDrumGuy

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I know this sounds stupid but here goes....

I have a vintage wood drum 5.5x14 snare shell. I want a 4x14 snare shell. Has anyone cut out the center part out of a shell and sandwiched the top part and the bottom part, then glued the center seam together? This way both original edges stay intact.

I don't have a table saw or jigsaw. I only have a circular saw which would probably destroy the shell. My plan was to draw the lines, use my Dremel to get as close as I could, then, sand the top of the bottom part flat, and the bottom of the top part flat, then glue them.

I suppose a MUCH easier way would be just chop the top or bottom and just redo one edge, but assume I want to keep both edges "original"......any ideas?

See, I told you it was stupid....
 

ARGuy

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It sounds like your shell is a straight shell, no reinforcing rings? Were you thinking about using the existing lug holes?
 

JazzDrumGuy

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No rings. Will probably fill holes and drill for new ones. I've done that before but I am anxious to expand my drum repair repertoire (although clearly doing it ass backwards!)....
heck I've done a bearing edge by hand, too...
 

Agent86

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A Bandsaw with a fine wood cutting blade would be the best way to cut it. The drum must be secured. I'm leaving this message 5 yr's late but someone may need this for future ideas. Where do you find this kind of bandsaw. Actually I don't know. maybe a cabinet maker might know where to find it. Think for a minute LOL So who cuts large wooden objects that need to be precise and well done. maybe you can buy one? kinda expensive I wood think. I would test first on a crap tom that you don't need. Oh well that's my 2 cents. just_say'n~
 

burgundy

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this works on 3 ply shells with re-rings, using this method you keep lug holes centered, and keep bearing edges, i'm using jazz's numbers, first draw a line across shell, this will line every thing up when it goes back together, using a table saw with fence set at 1" slowely turn shell into blade, cutting rings off each end, in this case that leaves a 3" shell, next using a router table with a flute bit set at 1/2" high, and fence set to remove only the outer shell plys from the re-ring, this will leave you with 1/2" on the end of ring with the bearing edge intact, glue the rings into each end of the shell, making sure to use the line to keep every thing in order, you should end up with a 4" shell, with original bearing edges, and snare beads, and lug holes centered. doing a little math any size can be had, i don't advise newbe running out and trying this first time, you could ruin drum or be wearing it!
 

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thin shell

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A Bandsaw with a fine wood cutting blade would be the best way to cut it. The drum must be secured. I'm leaving this message 5 yr's late but someone may need this for future ideas. Where do you find this kind of bandsaw. Actually I don't know. maybe a cabinet maker might know where to find it. Think for a minute LOL So who cuts large wooden objects that need to be precise and well done. maybe you can buy one? kinda expensive I wood think. I would test first on a crap tom that you don't need. Oh well that's my 2 cents. just_say'n~
Everybody in the industry uses a table saw to trim shells to length and for resizing shells.
 

OffbeatDrumCo

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this works on 3 ply shells with re-rings, using this method you keep lug holes centered, and keep bearing edges, i'm using jazz's numbers, first draw a line across shell, this will line every thing up when it goes back together, using a table saw with fence set at 1" slowely turn shell into blade, cutting rings off each end, in this case that leaves a 3" shell, next using a router table with a flute bit set at 1/2" high, and fence set to remove only the outer shell plys from the re-ring, this will leave you with 1/2" on the end of ring with the bearing edge intact, glue the rings into each end of the shell, making sure to use the line to keep every thing in order, you should end up with a 4" shell, with original bearing edges, and lug holes centered. doing a little math any size can be had, i don't advise newbe running out and trying this first time, you could ruin drum or be wearing it!
This would definitely be the preferred method. But Jazz said that it doesn't have re-rings.
 

thin shell

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This is the only way I would consider cutting down a shell if I didn't have a table saw.

https://www.drumforum.org/threads/how-to-cut-down-a-shell.108255/#post-1200219

The problem with cutting then gluing the two pieces back together is that you can't glue end grain. At least not effectively. So only the plies that run around the shell will get an effective glue bond. The lugs will add back some strength so it may be OK. To properly join the two pieces together for maximum strength would require cutting a 45 degree cut on one half and an opposite 45 degree cut on the other so you are gluing all of the grain at a 45 degree miter so the glue bond will be very strong and in addition the mating 45 degree edges will make it even stronger.
 

JazzDrumGuy

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Did I actually post this....I need to back away from the keyboard sometimes.....and no beers were harmed in asking this silly Q!

I will check out Burgundy's drawing and that link. I have no real tools sadly. I also have a 3 ply 10x14 Ludwig shell to tinker with but the original Q was about a vintage RB shell.....
 

Barden

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I know this sounds stupid but here goes....

I have a vintage wood drum 5.5x14 snare shell. I want a 4x14 snare shell. Has anyone cut out the center part out of a shell and sandwiched the top part and the bottom part, then glued the center seam together? This way both original edges stay intact.

I don't have a table saw or jigsaw. I only have a circular saw which would probably destroy the shell. My plan was to draw the lines, use my Dremel to get as close as I could, then, sand the top of the bottom part flat, and the bottom of the top part flat, then glue them.

I suppose a MUCH easier way would be just chop the top or bottom and just redo one edge, but assume I want to keep both edges "original"......any ideas?

See, I told you it was stupid....
If you're willing to invest in a router, build a router table, and build a jig for your circular saw then you can do your method well.

Mount your circular saw on a piece of plywood or MDF that is mounted perpendicular to another piece of plywood/mdf. The second piece will be your table and can double as your router table. If the circular saw is mounted with the blade parallel to the horizontal table and at an appropriate height, you can plunge the blade through the vertical wood it's mounted on. Then back the blade off until it's just exposed a little more than your drum shell thickness. Bring your shell in to rotate against the rotation of the sawblade and you should get very nice results. I would prefer a jig like this over a table saw because there is more surface contact with the bearing edge in reference. Also your circular saw blade is thinner than most table saw blades.

Once you sand the cut edges flat you will need a good way to keep the two parts aligned when gluing and to strengthen the joint. As already mentioned, a butt joint won't be ideal for strength. I would recommend making a half lap joint. Use the router table to cut through half of the inside of one shell piece about 1/4" or little more up the side. Then setup the table to cut the same height and depth from the outside of the other piece. You will have to sneak up on the fit checking often.
 

cworrick

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Why even bother gluing the pieces back together? Leave it open in the middle for venting:

1595355997274.png


edit
Looky what I found on google:

edit edit
Type "split shell snare drum" into google images. LOTS of examples.
 

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