Cutting down Hi Hat pull rod

blikum

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On this 90's Ludwig hi hat stand the pull rod is ridiculously long. So time for a trim. I didn't want to cut the finished end so my only option was the threaded end. I got this tap and die set from Harbor Freight and it's come in pretty handy from time to time. I wanted to remove 5" so I put the pull rod in the vice and started threading little by little. You have to go a few threads then back out and remove excess material. And repeat and repeat til you're at your desired length. Then broke out the hack saw and then filed the threaded end smooth. Works like a charm!

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Radio King

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On this 90's Ludwig hi hat stand the pull rod is ridiculously long. So time for a trim. I didn't want to cut the finished end so my only option was the threaded end. I got this tap and die set from Harbor Freight and it's come in pretty handy from time to time. I wanted to remove 5" so I put the pull rod in the vice and started threading little by little. You have to go a few threads then back out and remove excess material. And repeat and repeat til you're at your desired length. Then broke out the hack saw and then filed the threaded end smooth. Works like a charm!

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Nice job. Tapping new threads at the bottom (hidden) end is definitely the best way to do it.
 

REF

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Very nice job. I'm kind of surprised something from Harbor Freight works that well. Most things I have gotten over the years wear out pretty fast, especially tools that cut. I have to admit though, I have cut down so many hi-hat rods over the decades I never worried about losing 5/16" worth of chrome plating. The steel stays shiny enough.
 

blikum

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Very nice job. I'm kind of surprised something from Harbor Freight works that well. Most things I have gotten over the years wear out pretty fast, especially tools that cut. I have to admit though, I have cut down so many hi-hat rods over the decades I never worried about losing 5/16" worth of chrome plating. The steel stays shiny enough.
Yeah, I was a little surprised myself. The entire tap and die set was under $20.
 

thin shell

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I would be very careful using a tap from Harbor Freight. I have had taps from respected companies break off and can be very difficult to get out. A Die would be easy enough to get off since it's on the outside.
 

amosguy

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I would be very careful using a tap from Harbor Freight. I have had taps from respected companies break off and can be very difficult to get out. A Die would be easy enough to get off since it's on the outside.
The best trick is to go slow and use cutting oil. In the machine shop, I have seen broken taps and dies when someone tries to go too fast and no oil. Harbor Freight is not top notch tools but for the home owner they can do a good job.
 

Rufus T Firefly

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Yeah, I had the same problem, the rod sticking right up in front of a tom. I had my brother cut it off from the top but he is a professional. When he was done you couldn't tell it wasn't direct from the factory. Now if I'd tried that myself, I'd probably be shopping for a new hi hat stand!
 

thin shell

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The best trick is to go slow and use cutting oil. In the machine shop, I have seen broken taps and dies when someone tries to go too fast and no oil. Harbor Freight is not top notch tools but for the home owner they can do a good job.
I know how to use a tap. I always go slow, use oil and back out to clear chips. The smaller the tap the easier they are to break. Cheap ones break much easier than good ones.
 

nylontip

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Nice Job! I never thought to reduce it that way. Interesting.
I usually hack and file.
 

Drumming-4-Life

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I would be very careful using ANY ITEM from Harbor Freight.
Fixed... lol. Seriously, everything I've ever purchased from Harbor Freight has broken, malfunctioned, or became useless. Fake Dremmel, started sparking and almost electrocuted me... drill bits snap... even their cotton gloves fall apart with 1 washing. Maybe I just haven't found the right item?? :sex:
 

thin shell

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Fixed... lol. Seriously, everything I've ever purchased from Harbor Freight has broken, malfunctioned, or became useless. Fake Dremmel, started sparking and almost electrocuted me... drill bits snap... even their cotton gloves fall apart with 1 washing. Maybe I just haven't found the right item?? :sex:
They don't call them "Horror Fright" for nothing. Some of their stuff is actually decent and most of it is crap. I have found several car related boards where members have listed what is good and what is bad.
 

Splat

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For HF toolbits I see them as a once and done, maybe two times if I'm lucky. I've got tools from HF that I use a lot that still work fine after years of use. Portable metal bandsaw, horizontal metal bandsaw, heat guns, etc... If a tool is made cheaply it usually won't last but I don't throw tools around or abuse them like I did when I was a lot younger.
 

Mongrel

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Harbor Freight?

I’m still trying to figure out what’s so hard about a hacksaw, file, and sand paper....

lol
 

TheBeachBoy

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Nice job! I was fortunate to find a stand with a really short rod, so I didn't have to fix it. That's a pet peeve when the rod is taller than a cymbal stand. I like just enough for the hi hat and a tambourine, otherwise it gets in the way using my left hand to hit my left crash.

I've had pretty good luck with HF. At the price point, it's cheaper than renting and if I can get two jobs out of it, then it's paid for itself. My dremel has lasted years, just got a sliding compound miter saw that I've used for a couple projects so far, a table saw, speed squares, a screwdriver set that's lasted about 20 years, orbital sander going on a year now, the leather gloves in the 5 pack are decent, and any Pittsburgh brand hand tools have a lifetime warranty. I've had a couple clamps replaced. The car ramps have made my oil changes so much easier too. If this was for my job I'd go with better quality, but for home use it's fine. I don't abuse my tools but I also don't treat them lightly.
 
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Drumming-4-Life

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Shorter pull rods can be bought from dw if a 15" rod will work. They're $11.
When you buy an Iron Cobra or Speed Cobra hi-hat pedal, you get both long and short rods. I still cut mine, but I just cut the top, and use the grinder to make a nice finished edge... they never rust or look bad.

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