Cymbal crack repair with UV curable resin?

blue-onyx

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Has anyone tried to weld a crack in a cymbal with this new type of adhesive? UV curable epoxy or resin. Some available brands are: Bondic, Solarez, Illumabond, etc. it seems like an alternative to the laser welding idea. Would it work?

John
 

Six-Ply

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Not likely. I wouldn't even bother attempting that repair. Remove the crack and use the cymbal in a stack.
 

blue-onyx

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Not likely. I wouldn't even bother attempting that repair. Remove the crack and use the cymbal in a stack.
Well, here is the cracking. I am not sure about what six-ply is saying. I am trying to get ahold of that guy Jake that does the laser welding, but i think he may be out of business -- no responses.

Does anybody else do the laser welding thing? this is a Spizzichino cymbal, a keeper if it were not for the crack....

thanks

john
 

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Franklin Nigel Stein

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Six was probably thinking the crack was on the edge. I would call that unrepairable. Vibrations are murder on welding repairs.
 

squidart

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Considering those extreme cracks, why not just give the UV cure a try? It ain't gonna hurt the value at this point. That stuff works great on glass, etc. so I'd give it a go.
If there's a solvent available to remove it then you'd have the option to try laser welding if the UV cure fails.
 

multijd

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I wonder what it would sound like and if it might slow the spread of the crack if you put a cut out bell from another cymbal or even a small splash on the stand before putting this cymbal on. Maybe it might relieve some of the strain on the bell? What sound though?
 

jptrickster

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Here's your guy
I beat the hell outta this trans stamp for years now its better than new.

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vegadrums77

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What's the best way to reach Jake? I've emailed him, left him a message on FB and texted him...no response.
 

Franklin Nigel Stein

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Has anyone tried to weld a crack in a cymbal with this new type of adhesive? UV curable epoxy or resin. Some available brands are: Bondic, Solarez, Illumabond, etc. it seems like an alternative to the laser welding idea. Would it work?

John
Hey John. I've been mulling over what I'd do if I were in your shoes and I really needed to save that cymbal. So, here's what I came up with.

For any repair, your biggest enemy is going to be vibration. That pretty much kills most if not all of the options you're considering. With that in mind I would use golf club epoxy and glue a drilled out 1965 to 1969 JFK half dollar to the bottom side of the bell, aligning the holes to match. Those half dollars are unique in that they're made of 40% silver and 60% copper. The golf epoxy is made to take the abuse of 120 mph impacts with golf balls and the coin's alloy will vibrate ever so slightly mimicking what the cymbal is doing. Plus it should firmly hold all the cracks in place from the center.

The real upside here is that the repair can be permanent if you like it and reversible it you don't. Just put a heat gun to the coin and off it comes.

edit - get the 24 hour two part golf epoxy and patiently let it set.

Hope this helps.
 

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Franklin Nigel Stein

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This should be part of the discussion as well. If there really are successful welding repair out there, where are the YouTube videos of their successes?

Here’s what they tend to sound like after welding.

 

Masecar

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This should be part of the discussion as well. If there really are successful welding repair out there, where are the YouTube videos of their successes?

Here’s what they tend to sound like after welding.

Well, that sounded a lot better than I expected to.
 

mattr

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So, a couple things on this unfortunate situation…

The bell of the cymbal is greatly responsible for generation of the higher frequencies of the cymbal. So, epoxies and such would have a dampening effect…which may or may not have much effect on the sound (sort of the effect you’d get from a piece of tape), depending how much is applied.

There is NO fusion method (welding, brazing, soldering, electron beam, etc.) that can be performed on a cymbal. It doesn’t matter how good of a TIG welder someone might be… Tin’s melting point is 450F, and once that is exceed, all ductility is lost in that affected area and it is now brittle in the repair zone. The only way to get the base material uniformly ductile again would be to subject it to a material phase change (high temp with an immediate cold water quench)… but that would destroy the cymbal in the process.

My suggestion would be a steel grommet that is mechanical “swaged” through the mounting hole. This is done on many marching band cymbals (to minimize the shredding of the leather grips). With two cracks propagating outwards, when the cymbal is played, the areas of the bell would be sort of be deflecting independently of each other, which is creating more stress (and further propagating the crack). A mechanical fastening in the center should reduce that amount of independent deflection, sort of “bridging” the movement around.

Best of Luck!
 

mathale

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Tin’s melting point is 450F, and once that is exceed, all ductility is lost in that affected area and it is now brittle in the repair zone.
I hear (and understand) what you are saying, yet there are postings over the years where I've yet to come across anyone complaining about their laser repair (aside from any edge repair).
 

jptrickster

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Micro braze fusion repair has held on my cymbal for years now under heavy punishment.
Works for me!
 


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