Cymbals for Country Music?

GeeDeeEmm

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I agree. That’s why I suggested vintage/used A Zildjians or modern Ks, neither of which are truly dark sounding cymbals. Modern Ks are basically what A’s used to sound like, when A’s had more hammering, lathing etc. Which is why so many Rock drummers gravitated to regular Ks in the 90s. They were hearing what was traditionally the A Zildjian sound, in Ks.
And that great A sound is back, with the Ks simply moving into the EXTRAORDINARY category. I'm at GC now lusting my dark heart out over some new Ks that they just received. I need lots of money!

GeeDeeEmm
 

dangermoney

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I played traditional/outlaw country for years back in the 80's and as I recall, used 70's A cymbals: 14" new beats, 22" medium ride, 16/17/18 thin/medium thin crashes so I agree with the recommendations for the old A cymbals.

Most recently I played for several years in a modern country band and used 14" new beats, 20" ping ride, 18" K dark thin crash, and 18" A Custom crash. To me, the ping was a perfect ride for this music, great bell and good stick definition without an overbearing wash.

Today when I play country, modern or otherwise, I find that the following works best for me: 14" new beats, 20" K ride, 18" K dark thin crash, 18" A Custom crash (modern) or new design 18" A thin crash (traditional).

At least that is what worked for me. A lot of great ideas posted by others above ...
 
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JazzDrumGuy

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Not a country player at all, but I would think a pingy ride and bright small cymbals - maybe A custom 20 ride and 16/18 crashes with 14 hats? (I owned all of these in my A custom phase).

As an aside, interesting point about new K's = old A's......I love old A's as they are what they are, but I abhor newer K's - now I know why! The new A's should sound like old ones and the new K's should "try" to sound close to old K's.....duh!
 

bigbonzo

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The other night I was playing in my regular blues-oriented jam session with an Agop on my right and a Kerope on my left when a traditional 2-step country song was called. I was pleased because I love country music and never get to play it, but was mortified to discover that neither cymbal I had worked for the song. The Agop was tolerable, but the Kerope was totally wrong--neither a suitable crash nor ride. I mostly stuck to the hats to get through the song.

This made me wonder what those of you who play country use. I found myself missing my old Sabian HH Raw Bell Dry Ride and wanting a brighter crash of some sort on my left. Is this about the configuration country drummers use?
Just curious. What specifically was it that you didn't like with your current cymbals?
 

CherryClassic

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I play mostly low volume classic Country AND Western. I think I have finally found a crash cymbal that works for me. About a year ago or less I purchased a 16" Zildjian, A Thin Crash. Fairly new on the market I think. And that thing seems to react to my feelings when played. Kind of wierd I guess. Works for accents, and light playing but if you lay into it, it will crash out and fairly fast. It want set there and ring over time which I like.

I'm having trouble finding the ride I prefer for Country, don't know, maybe I'm just to particular. I like a ping like sound in away but I've heard some Jazz rides I like and what I don't like is the low rumble after sound that rings on for ever.

Kind funny I guess, I have a Bosphorus 21" Medium Thin Ride, inside the bell it's hand written 2690 I assume grams. Sounds good at first but as activated the low end rumble starts to build which I don't like. However, when played at lower level with only one tom up it tends to sound better I guess due to the rest of the set blocking the rumble sound. At 2690 grams, is that too heavy for a Thin ride? Would a lighter weight be better or a smaller size?

sherm
 

mgdrummer

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Prior to joining the classic rock band I've been in for the last five years, I played full time in a country band for another five years. I've continued to sub with over a dozen country cover bands in addition to my rock gig. I will either take out a set of reissue Paiste 602's or original Paiste Twenty's depending on the room. The 602's work well when I need less volume and the Twenty's are probably closer to what everyone who's suggesting A's will give you, but with the added Paiste "sparkle".
 

Old Drummer

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Just curious. What specifically was it that you didn't like with your current cymbals?
IMO, the Kerope provides a wonderfully lush crash sound, but I wanted a much brighter crash. The Kerope gives a nice washy ride sound, a great bed so to speak for a sax lead, but I wanted a more defined ping with less wash. The Agop is similar to the Kerope, just less pronounced in both characteristics. It would be OK as a ride and secondary crash, but not ideal. The Kerope was the real problem child.
 

AtlantaDrumGuy

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IMO, the Kerope provides a wonderfully lush crash sound, but I wanted a much brighter crash. The Kerope gives a nice washy ride sound, a great bed so to speak for a sax lead, but I wanted a more defined ping with less wash. The Agop is similar to the Kerope, just less pronounced in both characteristics. It would be OK as a ride and secondary crash, but not ideal. The Kerope was the real problem child.
A medium Kerope might be stronger than the regular version, but even then, wouldn’t be my choice for a ride in that type of setting. But MANY good choices are around in the Zildjian lineup!
 

Joe A

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I use a older 21” Sabian Dry Ride. Dave Sanger from Asleep at the Wheel turned me onto that somewhere in the 90’s.
I have an LL ride—the bell sounds like "Guitar Man", "When You're Hot", and whatever else, but I think I read here that the Dry Ride is based on the LL ride.
 

Monty

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I have an LL ride—the bell sounds like "Guitar Man", "When You're Hot", and whatever else, but I think I read here that the Dry Ride is based on the LL ride.
I've had both and much preferred the regular Dry Ride.
 

Joe A

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I've had both and much preferred the regular Dry Ride.
I've played a Dry Ride regularly for years that belonged to a church. I don't know which I like best—I have my LL for collecting purposes, practically—but the Dry certainly is great for all sorts of amplified music, and it does have a "country"ish sound.
 

Monty

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I've played a Dry Ride regularly for years that belonged to a church. I don't know which I like best—I have my LL for collecting purposes, practically—but the Dry certainly is great for all sorts of amplified music, and it does have a "country"ish sound.
I've had the Dry Ride for years. Last year I acquired a LL ride in a good deal. I found the LL ride close enough to the Dry Ride (yet preferred the Dry ride) that I traded in the LL ride. Yes a good collectors item but as a working drummer, I don't care too much to hang on to a cymbal simply because it's a collector's item.
To each their own tho!
 

JDA

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Has Bash-wash Riding come to country yet? I'm way up north, haven't been following it.
 


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