Cymbals that are physically impossible

JimmySticks

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I'd love 13" or 14" inch hihats that have the depth and crunch as well as the soft gush feeling of 16" or 17" hats. I once had a pair of New Stamp 13s I never should've sold that really did have this. Of the hundreds of cymbals I've had, they're among those I miss the most.

I've wondered what totally bizarro things could be made thinking of cymbals more like sculpture, with multiple layers and dimensions. Imagine 2 or more cymbals, connected to each other by the bell like, a Pagoda. Like a stack except much more resonant? What would playing the bell tube between each other sound like? They could be made at differing weights so that you can better isolate their sounds while playing the other.

Has anyone made cymbals with multiple bells?

Cymbals with multiple flanges in them?

Or cymbals with spring reverb, either suspended from the bottom surface, built like a bell but with a hollow cavity between the top and bottom surface, and then filled with a varying amount of springs or _____?
You've got a great imagination! Looks like you've given this some thought. There might be a job in lovely downtown Istanbul for a guy like you! :lol:
 

markkarj

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A cymbal so amazing that, once played, ensures that I no longer have a desire to buy any more **** cymbals would be nice.
Sadly, whenever I seem to have an amazing cymbal, it seems to have the opposite effect on me and I find myself buying new ones :/
 

bolweevil

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I’d love a ride cymbal with a volume knob.
That got me thinking, what if a cymbal had a built-in, real-time EQ adjustment, bell/bow, dark/bright and wash/stick ratio settings, etc. At first that sounded awesome but I think I would slowly drive myself insane fiddling with all the settings and eventually forget what a good cymbal should even sound like.
 

Sprice

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A really thin rideable bos or mehmet 18" or 20" that didn't crash super low.
 

Shovel&Pale

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After tons of searching and lots of trial and error my impossible cymbal wishlist is a ride cymbal that has stick definition and crashes well. Doesn’t seem like too much to ask but after a dozen or so rides that have come my way I’ve settled on a Paiste signature dry ride. But it’s still an imperfect balance as it does both well enough but neither attributes would I say is “great”
This to me is my pretty aged Sabian 21" AAX Stage Ride. Back when eBay was worth it I probably went through one a month searching. In addition to a good crash if hit on the edge, there's about 4 or 5 zones from edge to bell that can be worked depending on what I'm going for. Also, different stick weights and/or tip styles offer more variation if needed.
 

genco

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That got me thinking, what if a cymbal had a built-in, real-time EQ adjustment, bell/bow, dark/bright and wash/stick ratio settings, etc. At first that sounded awesome but I think I would slowly drive myself insane fiddling with all the settings and eventually forget what a good cymbal should even sound like.
Thats how I feel about the sound options on my DTX700 kit, and even further compounded by the options on the drum kit designer in Logic. I end up with a 32" Dark Ride Cymbal that plays like a slow motion gong and doesn't even sound good.

But okay, how could such a cymbal actually be made? Some kind of electro-mechanical system that can change the physical properties of a cymbal (density, shape / profile, and even size) to result in different acoustic properties (resonance, tone complexity, stick feel and sound)

Graphene and other carbon nanomaterials could eventually work, even though the tech is currently too fragile and expensive to make this a reality, it’s starting to make its way into consumer products. Hopefully the health concerns (properties with effects similar to asbestos) can be addressed.

Researchers have been able to twist and weave graphene layers together in a way that when electricity is applied, the shape and even magnetic properties can be manipulated into various positions. Imagine this either as a layer on top of, between the lathing, or even impregnated into the metal. You could rapidly change the lathing profile, bow, bell shape, density, etc. through some kind of interface that allows live control, or could sync to something like Ableton Live, where different “scenes” or sections of a song call for a different cymbal model.

A less exotic product using this tech I see happening relatively soon is a sensor that transparently triggers conventional acoustic cymbals for use in modules or interfaces. So you can have the playability and sensation of standard cymbals (including the variable surface dynamics) with the functionality and control of electronic drum environments. Which would, in a round about way, be what you first mentioned.
 

JimmySticks

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Thats how I feel about the sound options on my DTX700 kit, and even further compounded by the options on the drum kit designer in Logic. I end up with a 32" Dark Ride Cymbal that plays like a slow motion gong and doesn't even sound good.

But okay, how could such a cymbal actually be made? Some kind of electro-mechanical system that can change the physical properties of a cymbal (density, shape / profile, and even size) to result in different acoustic properties (resonance, tone complexity, stick feel and sound)

Graphene and other carbon nanomaterials could eventually work, even though the tech is currently too fragile and expensive to make this a reality, it’s starting to make its way into consumer products. Hopefully the health concerns (properties with effects similar to asbestos) can be addressed.

Researchers have been able to twist and weave graphene layers together in a way that when electricity is applied, the shape and even magnetic properties can be manipulated into various positions. Imagine this either as a layer on top of, between the lathing, or even impregnated into the metal. You could rapidly change the lathing profile, bow, bell shape, density, etc. through some kind of interface that allows live control, or could sync to something like Ableton Live, where different “scenes” or sections of a song call for a different cymbal model.

A less exotic product using this tech I see happening relatively soon is a sensor that transparently triggers conventional acoustic cymbals for use in modules or interfaces. So you can have the playability and sensation of standard cymbals (including the variable surface dynamics) with the functionality and control of electronic drum environments. Which would, in a round about way, be what you first mentioned.
You beat me to it, I was just about to bring up nano-materials and graphene layers... :blink:
 

Seb77

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A really thin rideable bos or mehmet 18" or 20" that didn't crash super low.
Bos Masters to my ear always have such a high crash sound.

After seeing Sabian Omnis etc., I think almost anything is possible pysically, you just need to be clever.
For me, most crashes that are thin enough are too low-pitched. Some As seem to work, but they often seem to be a bit flat/one-dimenasional. Can you have low-volume response, high pitch plus depth?
 

TPC

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If there’s a ride-, or crash-ride-, or crash-, or bell-sound that this cymbal can’t make, it’s my ears that are the problem, not the cymbal.
2C437BCC-EE82-4315-8B39-56BC41C0A3B7.jpeg
 

Old Drummer

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I have a cymbal sound in my head that I've never found in the real world. I therefore infer that the cymbal sound in my head is impossible to make in the real world. The alternative explanation that my head is out of whack doesn't appeal to me, so I prefer to blame the real world.
 


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