Cymbals to be used with drum mutes

MusicianMagic

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I want to setup my first drum set with rubber drum mutes for quieter practicing. I don't want to move the cymbals from my main kit. So that means using either the starter cymbals that came with that kit (which don't sound as good as trash can lids) or purchasing some better used cymbals just for using with the drum mutes.

Does it really matter whether using junk cymbals or better cymbals when using drum mutes on them? Or will they sound (or not sound) basically the same?


Want to set this kit up so if I want to play even in the middle of the night, I can just grab my sticks and play for a bit without disturbing my neighbors. Having to swap cymbals defeats the purpose.
 

Tama CW

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My experience with the mutes is that it will make pro and entry level cymbals sound basically the same. One warning about the drum mutes. If they stay on a cymbal for a long period of time, eventually it will leave a shadow on the cymbal that will not come off. Don't know how long it takes or if moisuture/humidity is needed as well. But, I've gotten some cymbals with shadows when dark foam cymbal mutes were involved. And even vigorous cleaning couldn't get that shadow off. A white cotton rag will work fine too for your mute.
 
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MusicianMagic

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My experience with the mutes is that it will make pro and entry level cymbals sound basically the same.
These cymbals I wouldn't even call "entry-level" I have frying pans that sound better Anyone ever try a Farberware non-stick skillet as a Ride Cymbal?

one of the reasons for putting the mutes on this kit is I don't want to discolor or mess up anything.
 

Old Drummer

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I don't have official mutes. Instead, I bought some car mats cheap at a discount store, cut circles out of them for the drums, and had pieces left over to throw on the cymbals. (Hint: One little piece between the hats protruding a little quiets them down a lot.) The drums almost sound like drums, sort of, albeit with no snare sound, but the cymbals just sound like hunks of low-pitched metal (although the hats vaguely have some tone).

If I were you, I'd put zero emphasis on the quality of muted cymbals. You ain't going to hear them the way they are, not even close (except maybe the hats a little).
 

fun2drum

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...eventually it will leave a shadow on the cymbal that will not come off...
Yes. There's something about rubber in contact with the surface of a cymbal that leaves a very pronounced discoloration over time. It's a weird dark discoloration in the exact shape of the mute - not at all similar to a patina that some might find desirable. Use cymbals that you'd otherwise throw away.
 

Stickclick

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one of the reasons for putting the mutes on this kit is I don't want to discolor or mess up anything.
Mutes will ruin the sound of the entire kit. Whap whap whap clunk clunk clunk is how I describe the sound. But you will be a lot quieter.
 

nolibos

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I used to put an Ace bandage around the edge of my ride, for practice. Learned from Chuck Brown.
 

Gunnellett

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I'd go with low volume cymbals. By the time you buy practice cymbals and mutes the cost may be a wash. I bought some Zildjian LV 80's and they are the most useful drum related purchase I've made, besides having the actual drums of course.

I can play at any time without bothering people. They mostly act like regular cymbals except for the hats which are way faster with the left foot due to all of the holes.
 

MusicianMagic

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I don't have official mutes. Instead, I bought some car mats cheap at a discount store, cut circles out of them for the drums, and had pieces left over to throw on the cymbals. (Hint: One little piece between the hats protruding a little quiets them down a lot.) The drums
I already had regular rubber drum mutes on my drums but I took your idea for the cymbals. I had some old thin car mats I was saving for some reason. They work fantastic on cymbals! Actually have them upside down, carpet side against the cymbals. Don't completely kill the sound or the decay but enough that I won't bother my neighbors. See how long they last.
 

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