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Dawn soak question

thejohnlec

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Hi all,

Do you normally dilute Dawn for rust removal or not? If so, do you have an average ratio?

Thanks in advance!
 

SwivoNut

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A Dawn soak won't remove rust but a Coke soak will. Soak your rusted parts in Coke or Pepsi overnight. Next day rinse off and polish with chrome polish (available from any automotive parts store). Any little dark spots that remain are where the rust has eaten through the chrome right down to the bare metal. You can't do anything about that but overall the parts will look much better. From a couple feet away they will shine like new.
 

thejohnlec

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Thanks guys! It’s been fairly well documented here and elsewhere that a Dawn soak is effective for removing some rust from parts, as well as generally removing surface grime and grease. Just seeing if anyone has a ratio of Dawn to water or if they don’t dilute at all.

Respectfully submitted - hope you’re all well!
 

thin shell

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A soak in Dawn and water will loosen some rust. I don't know what ratio but I normally use several squirts more than I would for washing the dishes.
 

kdgrissom

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I go waterless on Dawn, but only for a day or two at most.
 

JazzDrumGuy

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No ratio. Fill the container to cover with water. Add enough Dawn to make a soapy bubble bath. Probably 1/2 gallon water and 1 tsp Dawn.
 

D. B. Cooper

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No ratio. Fill the container to cover with water. Add enough Dawn to make a soapy bubble bath. Probably 1/2 gallon water and 1 tsp Dawn.

1 tsp?

I soak parts in pretty big totes. I sometimes use an entire small bottle in a storage tote that is 1/2 - 3/4 full of water.
Use as much as you want.

Can you really use too much?
 

JazzDrumGuy

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Yes a teaspoon. Maybe 2....I eyeball it.

As for too much, I have soaked chrome before for 24 hours in a Dawn bath and in the morning the Chrome was dull like nickel. What I typically do now soak for no more than a couple hours and then get a very non-abrasive sponge or old toothbrush and hand clean any rust, dirt and muck off the Chrome. I learned my lesson the hard way.

Usually Ludwig, Slingerland and Gretsch vintage Hardware has durable chrome plating. I don't remember the brand of the hardware that went south on me....
 

thejohnlec

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Hey all,

What’s your Dawn to water ratio for cleaning hardware, and roughly how long do you let the parts soak?

Thanks in advance!
 

Rich K.

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Don't waste your time. Dawn soaking is way overrated. It's messy and you have to dry off all the parts. Then you have polish them anyway.
Get a good chrome polish, apply it to the part, let it dry for a minute or two and hand polish with a cotton cloth. Get a toothbrush for getting the polish out of crevices.
 

Houndog

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Don't waste your time. Dawn soaking is way overrated. It's messy and you have to dry off all the parts. Then you have polish them anyway.
Get a good chrome polish, apply it to the part, let it dry for a minute or two and hand polish with a cotton cloth. Get a toothbrush for getting the polish out of crevices.
Seconded
 

Tama CW

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Dawn soaks are overrated........on some things.....like blackened rust.....or things already in very good shape. It's very helpful though on "lightly" rusted items....typically brown and orange rust.
At the black rust stage (oxidized bare steel, chrome gone) it takes an acid to remove that black oxide. Not a bad idea to do the soak to remove all contaminants from the item prior
to your chrome polishing. A typical chrome drum hoop I let soak for 1-4 hours. Then rinse....dry....and polish.

I recall a heavily rusted Gretsch Giant cymbal stand I had. 90% of it was covered in that brown-orange rust. I figured it was a basket case worth at most $5-$10.
I tossed it in a typical 1-100 to 1-500 Dawn Solution for 5 days. I came by every few hours and agitated the solution and the stand. It often helps to give it a light
wiping with a Brillo pad, 0000 steel wool, etc to remove that loose top layer of oxidation. Since the stand started out at nearly worthless, anything is an improvement.
It got cleaner every day. I was amazed. At the end of 5 days nearly all the brown and orange rust was gone. The chrome wasn't bright but it did shine a bit.
The stand looked decent and presentable. Sold it for $75 on Reverb. There's no way chrome polishing that on day 1 would have done anywhere near the same imo.
My view is soaking is the least aggressive form of cleaning you can do. Why not do that first?

Be careful your soak solution doesn't get too dirty or it could let the particles reattach to your item. I always rinse down a stand after the soak with water, and then with a Windex spray bottle.
The basic pH ammonia helps to neutralize any low pH (acidic) solution still on the stand.

Almost any solution of Dawn will work. The concentration affects the time needed. I've never tried 1-1. I typically use 1-50 to 1-500. Usually no more than a few hours
to a day is needed for most stands in good condition. When the item is not getting any better.....you're done. When stands get that cloudy or milky mildew look to them I don't find the
Dawn very helpful without scrubbing or polishing to remove that.

White vinegar is a good chrome cleaner (NOT nickel though). You can spice up the Dawn soak with some vinegar. A vinegar soak or rinse might only last 5-30 minutes. Swish it around frequently.
If I had to do that Giant stand again - I'd probably add 1/8 to 1/2 cup vinegar in the "tub" for faster rust removal.
 
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Houndog

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Dawn soaks are overrated........on some things.....like blackened rust.....or things already in very good shape. It's very helpful though on "lightly" rusted items....typically brown and orange rust.
At the black rust stage (oxidized bare steel, chrome gone) it takes an acid to remove that black oxide. Not a bad idea to do the soak to remove all contaminants from the item prior
to your chrome polishing. A typical chrome drum hoop I let soak for 1-4 hours. Then rinse....dry....and polish.

I recall a heavily rusted Gretsch Giant cymbal stand I had. 90% of it was covered in that brown-orange rust. I figured it was a basket case worth at most $5-$10.
I tossed it in a typical 1-100 to 1-500 Dawn Solution for 5 days. I came by every few hours and agitated the solution and the stand. It often helps to give it a light
wiping with a Brillo pad, 0000 steel wool, etc to remove that loose top layer of oxidation. Since the stand started out at nearly worthless, anything is an improvement.
It got cleaner every day. I was amazed. At the end of 5 days nearly all the brown and orange rust was gone. The chrome wasn't bright but it did shine a bit.
The stand looked decent and presentable. Sold it for $75 on Reverb. There's no way chrome polishing that on day 1 would have done anywhere near the same imo.
My view is soaking is the least aggressive form of cleaning you can do. Why not do that first?

Be careful your soak solution doesn't get too dirty or it could let the particles reattach to your item. I always rinse down a stand after the soak with water, and then with a Windex spray bottle.
The basic pH ammonia helps to neutralize any low pH (acidic) solution still on the stand.

Almost any solution of Dawn will work. The concentration affects the time needed. I've never tried 1-1. I typically use 1-50 to 1-500. Usually no more than a few hours
to a day is needed for most stands in good condition. When the item is not getting any better.....you're done. When stands get that cloudy or milky mildew look to them I don't find the
Dawn very helpful without scrubbing or polishing to remove that.

White vinegar is a good chrome cleaner (NOT nickel though). You can spice up the Dawn soak with some vinegar.
If I had to do that Giant stand again - I'd probably add 1/8 to 1/2 cup vinegar in the "tub" for faster rust removal.
Plain water will do the same thing .
 

Tama CW

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Plain water will do the same thing .

Water won't do nearly as much as dedicated cleaners like Dawn Soap. And the pH of your tap or well water determines what if anything the water can do.
Let's assume tap water at pH of 7. The Dawn soap is around pH 9.....or 100x more basic. I'll continue to use the Dawn, ammonia, and vinegar as needed.
Leaving a stand sitting in tap water will more than likely lead to more rusting.....not removing rust.

https://rusticwise.com/ph-of-dish-soap/

What’s in dish soap?​

Dishwashing detergent for handwashing dishes is considered a mild, or light-duty cleaning solution. Here are the main ingredients you’ll find in most regular dish soap:³

  • Surfactants (mostly anionic surfactants which remove grease to get dishes clean) including sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) and sodium laureth sulfate (SLES)
  • Ethyl alcohol (used to control viscosity and acts as a solvent)
  • Suds and lather boosters
  • Stabilizers to ensure a long shelf life (this includes acyl or fatty acid ethanolamides
  • Cleans metals like gold, silver, platinum. (......and obviously chrome and nickel drum parts).
 

JazzDrumGuy

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It depends. Condition of hardware, amount of hardware and brand. Generally, I use 12-16 oz of hot water and maybe a teaspoon. If it's just a single item, I use a toothbrush and just individually apply it mix with hot water. Some Chrome will not last soaking overnight and will actually tarnish. I've experienced that with vintage Ludwig lugs. I'd like to soak for maybe one to two hours. And then do a Hot Water Rinse and shake them dry and then towel them dry then let them air dry. That's no big deal. You can use a small brass or steel bristled brush depending on the level of grime. You can use a two-sided sponge that is not abrasive to clean the metal. You don't necessarily need to polish it up. Those types of sponges and some Windex also goes a long way depending on what you're trying to achieve. I prefer to shy away from the chemicals such as the chrome polish plus I don't have a buffing wheel.
 

patrickwitherow

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I've got lugs, tension rods, springs, inserts, a butt plate and a P87 strainer soaking in a Dawn/water bath right now.
Check out how brown the water got after just a few hours last night. This morning I dumped the water and a ton of debris
was at the bottom. I added fresh Dawn and fresh water to soak again while I'm at work.

IMG_2844.JPG
 


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