Decent speakers for Electronic drums?

reabtima

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Total beginner here,
I would like to connect some speakers to my Roland TD-1 set, i tried plugin-in an old guitar amp and it sounds HORRIBLE - especially the bass and the Hi-Hat (The sound of the stick hitting the rubber is much stronger then the sound the amp is letting out).
Are there any low priced speakers (Even PC/portable/non-amp speakers/ANYTHING) that will do a decent job at this?
I basically just want to jam with some friends so i need the minimal thing that would work

Thanks
 

electrodrummer

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This is asked every day on every drum forum :)

A PA is the answer.

If you want to buy your own, and your band or venue doesn't have one:
Min 12" woofers. Speakers on stands, tweeters at ear height. Plenty of cost-effective options 2nd hand in the world if you want to save money, (don't know what you are - you didn't say).
 

LBCD

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I run a small Mackie Mix5 into 2 Mackie powered 12” speakers. Just make sure to keep the input power on the speakers below unity.
And for bigger gigs a Yamaha powered mixer into 2 ea Yamaha 15” cabs.
 

jazzerone

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You asked "Are there any low priced speakers (Even PC/portable/non-amp speakers/ANYTHING) that will do a decent job at this?"

No. There are not. Anything that fits the criteria you just described will sound like crap.

The problem with amping an e-kit is that you're trying to reproduce a really wide range of sounds, from the low end thud of the bass drum to the high end of a crash cymbal. Most amps are designed to do something within a specific range of those frequencies, but very few cover everything, and if they do they're expensive. That's why you're being told to run it through your PA, which comes off a board, which has the ability to dial in highs and lows.

But there is hope, if you're willing to sacrifice a bit. For starters, stay away from bass amps and guitar amps --- one is too muddy, the other too tinny. Shoot for something like a Roland keyboard amp, which are designed to accommodate both the high end and low end of a keyboard. They typically have a good sized main speaker and a smaller tweeter. You won't get a real deep thud for your bass drum, or a crystalline ring for your cymbals, but you'll be somewhere in the middle. That's the best you can hope for if you stay at the cheap end of this.

Shop around and you should be able to find something from the Roland KC line that will do the job for under $200. Anything cheaper than that... refer to the first line of my answer.
 

Frank Godiva

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Second the used keyboard amp and Roland is a solid pick. If you want cheap American made, keep an eye out for a local Peavey KB300. They show up for cheap but are heavy yet indestructible and loud with a 15 and a horn.
 

Angel

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I’m just talking about monitors here. Everybody will be different according to how they like to hear drums. Now, I have decades of live experience playing every type of venue (playing original rock music). If you are playing 500 and under capacity, (2x) 15” speakers with a horn will do in a pinch. These powered 15” with a horn are ridiculously cheap. Personally, if I was just starting out, I would buy one for my personal monitor. If you get to the point of playing live, I would buy 2 more to run at both ends of the stage. Most places 250 & up will probably have their own house monitors. I did this for years so, I know it’s adequate. This applies to clubs that have their own house PA.


Here’s a list of what is pretty representative of 15” speakers with a horn. Shop around for best prices. Go to a music store and listen to what they have in stock in your price range.

https://www.sweetwater.com/c134--15_inch_PA_Speakers?sb=low2high


If you really want to hear what your drums can sound like, you will need a dedicated sub-woofer with a top speaker of your choice. I personally run a Yamaha DSX 15 Sub with a Yamaha DXR 12 as my upper speaker. I also have a 16-space shock mount Rack Case. I have three Furman PL-Plus DMC Power Conditioner’s. One for each speaker and one for my module. This is where you will get thousands of different answers. Regarding a sub, 15” & 18” are the most common. I prefer 15” because it provides a lot of punch. The 18” will provide more low end but, it will be boomier. You will have no need for one of these set-ups unless you are playing professionally, have a big space to rehearse, you just have the money to do it, or you are crazy like me.


For now, stick with a 15” speaker with a horn, in your price range and you will be happy. I used this set-up in a generic basement rehearsal space (with full band), and it worked perfectly fine for many years.
 

GeeDeeEmm

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When it comes to inexpensive but adequate for practice situations, it would be hard to beat the Peavey KB300. Find a used one.

If you require more volume than that, you will be forced to go with a main/sub system as noted above.

GeeDeeEmm
 

Drm1979

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I tried a cheap alternative, my wife's karaoke machine that she has for girl scouts. Despite the fact that it is very loud with a microphone it's practically worthless for drums. Your pad hits will be louder than the speaker. Unfortunately the cheapest alternative for playing out will be an amp. And it needs to be an amp designed to handle lows, mids and highs to sound at all good. Check the used gear section on guitarcenter.com and look for lowest price in the filters. Best thing is it can be shipped from store to store, or to your home for free.
 

TheJay

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Alesis Strike 12 Amp (2000 watts), 'nuff said!
 

Vicegrips

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For practice, I latched onto a Simmons DA2012b for about $200 new maybe 6 months ago. Totally pleased. Much like TheJay's Strike amp.
 

lrod1707

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Total beginner here,
I would like to connect some speakers to my Roland TD-1 set, i tried plugin-in an old guitar amp and it sounds HORRIBLE - especially the bass and the Hi-Hat (The sound of the stick hitting the rubber is much stronger then the sound the amp is letting out).
Are there any low priced speakers (Even PC/portable/non-amp speakers/ANYTHING) that will do a decent job at this?
I basically just want to jam with some friends so i need the minimal thing that would work

Thanks
Don't overlook Kustom amps. They are high quality and have a pretty low price. Best bang for the buck and you are buying something new instead of something that's possibly beat up. I have a Kustom PA50 which is a small Personal amplifier that I connect to my samplepad and it gives more than enough sound to equal my acoustic drums when I play them together and the thing is built like a tank. I've had zero issues with mine in almost 2 years. (read the reviews!) If you just want something to jam with friends you can get one of their 15" powered setups and it will be more than adequate. Years ago I had a Yamaha e-kit with a 50 watt Simmons DA50 which is 50 watts and it was loud enough. That means that a 15" Kustom powered box which is 100 watts will blast!
Here are a couple of them. You can buy them from either Musicians friend or Guitar center:



$150 & $280 respectively for brand new equipment. You have two different price ranges to choose from!
Good luck,
LRod
 

TheJay

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For practice, I latched onto a Simmons DA2012b for about $200 new maybe 6 months ago. Totally pleased. Much like TheJay's Strike amp.
It's true, they have the same shell. The internals are completely different and the speaker I recommended is specifically for drummers.

There are some good videos on YouTube about the speaker I recommended, there is one by this chap who even compares it to the other speakers that use the same shell.

I bought the Alesis Strike Amp 12 Drum Amplifier for £263.99 when I posted the recommendation.
 

Peartfect

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I searched first, came across this thread, and I'm glad that I did.
For simple home use while jamming to songs in my Alesis Nitro kit, is the Simmons DA25 or DA50 a decent purchase to hear the drums and the song ok?
I also read, too late, that most of you/us drummers look for used gear first because we will all eventually outgrow what we have. Is that a factual and practical policy to follow?
 

TheJay

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If you want to play drums, please use the version designed for them: Alesis Strike Amp 12 Drum Amplifier

I can't comment on the practical advice about buying used other than to say it makes sense unless you buy the best to begin with and don't have to keep spending to "upgrade".
 

dboomer

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Don't overlook Kustom amps. They are high quality and have a Years ago I had a Yamaha e-kit with a 50 watt Simmons DA50 which is 50 watts and it was loud enough. That means that a 15" Kustom powered box which is 100 watts will
Just to set the record straight, doubling the power of any amplifier will produce a barely noticeable increase in overall loudness. To double loudness takes 10x the starting power (and of course the speakers will probably not handle that)
 

lrod1707

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Just to set the record straight, doubling the power of any amplifier will produce a barely noticeable increase in overall loudness. To double loudness takes 10x the starting power (and of course the speakers will probably not handle that)
So a 100 watt amp hooked up to speakers that "can" handle it won't be louder than a 50 watt amp with speakers that "can" handle it? Never heard that, but OK. I've doubled amperage on setups and their has definitely been an increase in volume. I started in the late 80's with a Peavey basic 50 bass amp (my first amp!) and progressively went up with other Peavey's when the volume wouldn't satisfy and the volume was most definitely louder.
 

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