Dent in my Supra

Topbnanna

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I have a supra 400 that's almost 40 years old, and it has lived its share of life. Like many drums of a certain age, it probably got dropped, at least once, on the strainer, which gave it a nice dent in the shell. it's difficult to see from the photos, but the spot where the bottom part of the P85 sits has left an almost perfect outline of the strainer in the shell, and is about 1/8" deep.

I'd blame the previous owner, but there isn't one. I got this drum new when I was 12.

View attachment 499966 View attachment 499967

The question is, what's the best way to deal with dents in aluminum shells? It doesn't affect the sound, and I never notice it unless I'm looking for it. Is it worth trying to pound it out? The drum is not pristine by any means. It has noticeable acne and spiderweb cracks in the chrome. I have no intention to sell it, mainly because I really like the way this drum sounds. Is there any risk to pounding it out? Any tips?
Doesn’t affect the sound.. I say leave it.
the repair may make it more noticeable
 

dlshore

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I had a dynasonic that came along with a set I bought. The drum had been dropped on the clockface strainer and the shell dented behind it enough that the snares couldn't be pulled up tight. I took it to a tuba repair shop and they hammered it out, mostly. They told me they didn't want to go more than about 90% due to the risk of causing more trouble. That was more than sufficient to pull the snares up tight again.
 

esooy

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If you are going to try to hammer out the dent, I'd suggest not hitting the dent directly with a hammer, but hit a piece of wood which in turn hits the dent. If you had a piece of wood that was curved to the same or similar curve of the shell that would be best. Also, I have a sand bag that I support the shell with. Maybe a bag of rice would do the same function.
 

michaelocalypse

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Other than paintless dent removal (automotive), I'd say just leave it.
Also, if you do PDR, I'd let the guy know it's aluminum, and probably a pretty soft alloy at that. Let him ease into it instead of accidentally going to far.
 

backtodrum

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if you don't feel confident trying to get it out yourself, I would take it to a paintless dent repair auto center and see if their techs you attempt it. They have the proper nylon (soft) hammers and other tools etc. to remove the dent and make it unnoticeable. Just a thought...
 

lossforgain

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I hate to rain on anyone's parade, but when I was in the car business and Ford started using aluminum for a bunch of the body panels on the F-150, PDR guys wouldn't touch it. They said that aluminum doesn't repair as well as steel. Not sure that means it CAN'T be done, but a PDR guy may not want to try.
 

BennyK

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That doesn't look very serious, but I've a feeling you're itching to have a go at it , so ..... the way I've handled these are by pressing them out with a clamp and forms made out of pieces of 14" wood shell . One in side and one outside .
 

feelyat

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Thanks everyone for the replies. I did manage to get it mostly fixed with no significant damage to the shell. If I look for it under the light, I can still see a slight impression of the throw on the inside curvature of the shell, but it's just a shadow of what it was. For what this drum is, it's exactly what I was hoping for.
 
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lossforgain

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Thanks everyone for the replies. I did managed to get it mostly fixed with no significant damage to the shell. If I look for it under the light, I can still see a slight impression of the throw on the inside curvature of the shell, but it's just a shadow of what it was. For what this drum is, it's exactly what I was hoping for.
That’s how I feel about my bronze shell that I worked on. Good job!
 

moonbabie

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I just noticed this thread otherwise I would have givin my input sooner... A little tape on the ends and flatten that sucker. .I’m glad it worked out for you. 3841E5DA-EFF1-4ABE-A24B-ED4A7327987C.jpeg
 


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