Difference between Rogers 9/72 and FULLERTON

ludwigdrummerbr

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well, since i´m a ludwig guy , i dont know much about Rogers...
I´d like to know if there are differences in the shel l ( 3ply, 5 ply... i dont know ) between Rogers 9/72 and FULLERTON .
I have already a 9/72 kt, 14x 24 - 12x 15 -16x 16 - 16x18 and i just found a 9x13 FULLERTON for a VERY good price., and i need to know if will match in sound ( i dont care if its the same color inside) .
thanks a lot!!
 
L

leedybdp

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All 9/72 Rogers drums are Fullerton, California drums. But, all Fullerton drums are not 9/72 Rogers drums. Further examination would show if the drum in question is an earlier leftover from Ohio, a later XP8, or XP10. Some Fullerton drums were actually made in various places such as Monrovia, California for a short while, and a few unsuccessful tries in Mexico. To further confuse matters, Cleveland and Dayton era Rogers were actually produced in Covington, Ohio. The drum will probably sound just fine with the others no matter where or when it was made.
 

ludwigdrummerbr

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so here is some pictures of the tom, do not know if they help (I'm not with the tom here with me, just the pictures)






 

drums147

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It should sound great with the rest of your kit and the perfect drum to compliment the 12" x 15" . . . this label is the precursor to the 9/72 . . . this drum is probably about 1971 or early '72 . . . what is a VERY good price if you don't mind my asking . . . NAD
 

ludwigdrummerbr

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It should sound great with the rest of your kit and the perfect drum to compliment the 12" x 15" . . . this label is the precursor to the 9/72 . . . this drum is probably about 1971 or early '72 . . . what is a VERY good price if you don't mind my asking . . . NAD
Good to konw this...
about the price, around the $ 50.00 plus ship... its a good price ? I know that are some rust ...what do you think?
thaks a lot!!!
 
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leedybdp

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BUY IT NOW! That's a very good price. The hardware alone is worth more than that.
 

poot

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That does sound like a very good price. DanC will provide the details on 9/72 vs. Fullerton; he's our Rogers expert. But I don't think you can go wrong on this deal.
 

DanC

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Those big Fullerton tags were used from late 1969 thru mid-1972. At that point the 9/72 tags appeared. There were no changes to the drums, and things were virtually the same until the Big R era began in 1975-6. Still the same drums, but different badges and the Memriloc hardware appeared.

As mentioned, the manufacturing being moved as an experiment did have an impact on the drums for a period or two, mainly evident in the edges not being consistent. Still good drums, and I've not encountered one I couldn't tune.
 

Elvis

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So this is what all the hoopla's been about?
Tags?
...:rolleyes:...
I've heard that Cleaveland era shells were thinner and featured sound rings, but the shell got a little thicker and lost the rings just after the "move" (???) to Dayton.
From then on, the shell stayed the same, until the XP8 shells appeared.
This is how I (NOT a Rogers expert of any kind) understand things.
How far off am I?
...and can someone do a quickee expose on the "XP10" shell, please?
I can't recall ever hearing of one before.



Elvis
 
L

leedybdp

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So this is what all the hoopla's been about?
Tags?
...:rolleyes:...
I've heard that Cleaveland era shells were thinner and featured sound rings, but the shell got a little thicker and lost the rings just after the "move" (???) to Dayton.
From then on, the shell stayed the same, until the XP8 shells appeared.
This is how I (NOT a Rogers expert of any kind) understand things.
How far off am I?
...and can someone do a quickee expose on the "XP10" shell, please?
I can't recall ever hearing of one before.



Elvis
XP-10 snare drums were top of the line wooden shelled snare drums from the early 80's. Tommy Kat and Dan C are the Rogers authorities here--not I.
 

blujax01

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My Londoner V Swiv-O-Matic 9/72's (well used to be mine now another forum member has them) had re-rings.
 

JohnG

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I have an early Fullerton Londoner 5 with the larger tags, not the 9/72. They are 3 plys. Interesting thing is the center ply is much darker than the outer 2.
 

DanC

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Starting in 1963, the shells came from Keller, were 3-ply and had solid rings. A year or 2 later, the shells switched to 5-ply and plied rings. I have reviewed in the past the (scarce) info in the catalogs and it seems to me that the shells switched from 5-ply to 3-ply and back somewhere along the way. It's tough to count the plies because of them being painted up to the edge, and it would be tough to track down an example for each year/catalog to have a lab test.

In the 60's and into the 70's drum building was far from the science it is now, and the drummers didn't care. But the marketing mavens subsequently pounded it into everyone's head, and now everyone cares. ;)

Personally, I don't care. The thickness of the shells seemed to remain consistent, and I can't really hear any difference in sound among the post-1970 examples I've had.

All of these shells had rings until the XP8's came along in 1979.
I don't think I've ever seen the term 'XP10' in any Rogers catalogs, but it's true that the XP8 maple snares were 10-ply, not 8. That model name has come into use amongst the Rogers fans, it is a little more accurate...

As far as the differences among drums re tags/eras: there are many, up thru 1970 or so, and then things were pretty stable until 1979.

The Cleveland drums were the heaviest, and had the best parts. The early 66 Daytons were identical, but then changes (i.e. speckled paint) gradually appeared thru 1968. Then in 1969 they moved to Fullerton, and the gradual changes continued. All the while, still great drums.

The collectors love anything flat-grey inside. Me, I love them all....
 

tommykat1

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The Cleveland Swivo series of the early 60s are 3 ply Kellers and considered the holy grail. In the Dayton era, they went to 5 plies, still pretty much holy grail. In the Fullerton era, there was a smattering of 5, then 3, then back to 5 ply as the Big Rs came out. All of these drums had re-rings. It is thought that the sandwiched wood to go along with maple was poplar.

In 1979, the all maple 8 ply XP8 series was introduced around the time that the high quality and relatively inexpensive Japanese drums took hold in the U. S. market. The XP8s can be purchased at very good prices today, but they are beginning to catch on with collectors. It's hard to argue with the sonic quality of 8 plies of now extinct old growth New England rock maple, 28 years seasoned. These drums are uncannily light in weight, and yet rigid enough (due to glue and number of maple plies) to not require rerings.

The XP10 is the name given to the 10 ply maple Dynasonics and Supertens from 1982 and 1983 .(In 1984, the company stopped production and sold off stock before they folded in July.) They were produced in 5", 6.5" and 8" depths, also without rerings. You see the 6.5" and 8" selling at $400-600 fairly regularly, but the factory only built a dozen or so total of the 5" Dynas and Supertens. Seriously, a 5" XP10 Dynasonic is more rare than anything other than a special order 60s Dyna, and the 5" Superten is arguably the most rare of any mainstream Rogers wood snare. I have seen only one of these, and maybe three 5" XP10 Dynas. A 5" XP10 Dyna sold on eBay in June 2008 for $2,025, and I haven't seen one since.
 

tommykat1

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Whoops, sorry Dan, you evidently were writing as I was, and your post beat mine above!

Re the XP10 name, it appeared in an American/Japanese catalog, and the name began sticking with Rogers aficionados a couple of years ago.

I think Ploughman has cornered the market on these great snares!




 

DanC

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Tommy, you've got me there: I don't have that catalog! I have them all from 1960-on, but not that one: only recently saw one in a photo you had posted a while back.

So, XP10 is a legit model name eh? That's very cool....
 

Elvis

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DanC and TommyKat,

Thank you very much for your very informative replies. :thumbright:
Much appreciated.


Elvis
 


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