Do cymbal stands have an effect on how a cymbal sounds?

Frank Godiva

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So the type of rim on a drum has a bearing, straight legs vs bent on floors, isolation mounts vs a pipe inside the drum all have been topics of discussion over the years on how things sound.

So do cymbal stands play any part in the sound of the cymbal that on it?
 

frankmott

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Yes. It's easy enough to test if you have two wildly different weight cymbal stands. I do, and I have. They speak more quickly and ring longer on a lighter stand. Same bottom felt, no top felt, no wingnut for quick change. No tilt. Maybe an extreme tilt would ameliorate the difference. I didn't try that.
 

fun2drum

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I think my ride sounds better on a bass drum mounted arm attached to an INDe mount rather than on the Ludwig classic mount, and even more so than on a boom stand. It may be my imagination, but I believe there’s a difference.
 

NobleCooleyNut

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I used big double braces stands until I came to my senses and realized that I did not need these type of stands . I now use Tama Classic series , Yamaha Crosstown and Canopus Jeff Hamilton stands - all classified as lightweight and my cymbals never sounded better . My back appreciates the added weight savings as well .
 

underratedcowbell

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Sure they do. Just perfom a series of tests and you will find that out for yourself and be shocked like I was!
I can hear the biggest differences between lightweight cymbal stands and heavyduty boom stands with stand weights.
 
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Drumbumcrumb

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Yes! Lightweight flat base addict here. The more anchored anything is, the more sound will get soaked up by the anchor. That applies to drums, cymbals, turntables, speakers, any damn thing. Ever heard a 24” bass drum with gullwings equipped with floating floor tom feet? WHOMP

Now, before anyone says it, I’ll say it - it probably takes a hopeless geek to hear the difference and care. Nobody ever switched stands and heard a random audience member say “Wow, your cymbals sound totally different than the last show!” It’s just a little audiophile type detail that the drum geek in me appreciates.
 

Frank Godiva

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Ok the consensus seems to be yes it does have a bearing on the sound. That begs a few questions.

Why doesn't any manufacturer latch on to this concept? I don't recall any hardwear manufacturers claiming their cymbal stand will make your cymbals sound their best.

If the stand plays a big role, and I agree it does, why hasn't this been addressed by manufacturers?

The big question of course is, thus ergo;

Which cymbal stands sound the best?
 

ThomasL

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Try playing your ride on your finger tip. The difference is noticeable compared even to a lightweight stand.

IIRC, Peter Erskine thinks cymbals sound better on flatbase stands and he switched from Yamaha to Tama because Yamaha wouldn't make one. (Ok, I admit, he used to endorse both the Drumat and Drumdial, so I don't take his endorsements too seriously.)
 

jsp210

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Why doesn't any manufacturer latch on to this concept? I don't recall any hardwear manufacturers claiming their cymbal stand will make your cymbals sound their best.

If the stand plays a big role, and I agree it does, why hasn't this been addressed by manufacturers?
A manufacturer could kill two birds with one stone by offering stands with an interchangeable tilter piece that accommodates both new and old cymbal mounting hole sizes while touting the superior sound optimizing characteristics of their special design. Probably a very small market niche though that cares about this. I would be all over it.
 

underratedcowbell

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From the top of my head, for me one of the reasons is that players are always changing their cymbal setup; some sound good, some don't, some folks like one cymbal, others don't. Manufacturers know that so there isn't that much investment in something they know is a highly subjective matter and not subject of consensus!

But nowadays you see that manufacturers are adressing things like snare stands that take less low-end and resonance of toms, so they are paying attention to what drummers are demanding!
 

Drumbumcrumb

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Well, they have kinda addressed it with suspended cymbal stands. But the reason (I guess) we don’t see everyone making and/or using some fancy cymbal isolation rigs is the difference isn’t noticeable enough to warrant a change in setup or expense. Traditional stands work, they play well with drum kits, they’re easy to produce, etc.

You can get Aquarian cymbal springs, not marketed for isolation or sound improvement, rather for protection. But a cymbal sitting on a spring should lose less sound into the stand. Reviews are polarized, and I haven’t tried them, so idk.

Those shock-absorber isolators are cool, but are they worth it? Idk. Something to consider is that an isolated cymbal doesn’t necessarily sound BETTER, it just sounds different. I mean, I don’t want MORE overtones from my old Zildjians! Seriously though, it’s a diminishing returns thing, cymbals sound good in a heavy stand, maybe a hair better (different) in a light stand... Nobodies pulling out their hair saying “If I could only isolate this damn thing, THEN Id have the sound I want!”
 

eigentone

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Yes. I went really cheap with my first set of hardware. 1-2 years later, I decided to stick with acoustic drums and I bought quality hardware. I did not cheap out on cymbals when I started out. I put them on the new stands and was surprised by how different they sounded. It made the cymbals on the lightweight stands sound like they had a bandpass filter on them. This was going from cheap lightweight to quality heavy duty. So the difference may not be so obvious in other comparisons. I like the sound of my cymbals on these stands but it's ultimately subjective as to which stand sounds better to your ear.
 

Seb77

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A little tweak that goes a long a way is replacing the standard metal washers with smaller rubber ones. I found some in the plumbing department, did have to enlarge the hole a bit. Makes the cymbal swing more easily.

I got a set of those Tama Classic stands, not sure yet about the influence on sound, I could make a comparison audio of those and a heavy boom double-braced stand with weight.
 

polycrescendo

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When I finally swapped the boom arm out for my ride I was caught off guard by how much better the Yamaha 800 series boom arm made my ride sound. The old arm I was using was an old 1" hollow Ludwig Hercules boom and in retrospect it seems like it was sucking the life out of my ride. Now it sounds much more lively and has more shimmer.
 

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