Do many Pros/Semi-Pros use E-drums ?

michaelg

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Do many of you guys who gig regularly use an e-kit for practice ?

I currently use Aquarian superpads and Zildjian L80's which are great but I'm tempted to pick up a 2nd hand Roland e-kit primarily as i like the idea of being able to mix MP3's thru the module for play-along.
 

dtk

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I think the issue of using them for practice has been that they feel different (pads vs heads).

I was surprised at a concert this summer to see 3/4's of the bands using e drums with their acoustics.
 

michaelg

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Thanks, yes I've tried them a few times in the past and not really a fan of how them feel etc etc but being able to mix in MP3's for practice in earphones appeals to me.

My idea is to use the ekit for just MP3's and then when i want to work on other stuff i"ll just fit my L80's on them and place my superpads/reflexx over them.
 

electrodrummer

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Try Yamaha silicone pads if you're looking for quiet with a mylar feel. Mesh is horrible. Boing Boing.
 

wolfereeno

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why not? don't drummer drum on everything?!

I practice on my vdrum-ish set at home all the time. Mainly for volume as I'm in an apt, but also for ease of recording and frankly experimental fun since it's midi'd up to everything.

But I also have a share in a practice room where I can play my acoustics. It's different but that's what's fun!
 

jazzerone

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I practice on both, play out on both. They're not the same instrument, like an acoustic guitar and an electric guitar are not the same instrument, like an acoustic piano and an electric piano are not the same instrument. If your question is, can you transfer your practice on an e-kit to your a-kit, the answer is... it depends. If you practice doubles and speed on the bouncy mesh heads of an e-kit and expect the same results on an a-kit, then no. You can't practice dynamics on an e-kit. After listening to the sampled drum sounds of an e-kit through headphones some guys are disappointed with the sound of their a-kits and start to tinker with heads, tuning, sticks for no good reason.

On the other hand, if you understand they are not the same instrument and use the e-kit as a practice tool to develop your ears, your approach to the music, your time, your musicality on fills and solos, and just as a generic substitute that allows you to play when acoustic drums are not an option, then yes.

It really is all about understanding that you've got 2 very different instruments.
 

michaelg

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Thanks Lads, I wouldn't be using it to practice technique, only for learning songs and playing along with drumless tracks.
 

rogerwilco

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I put a set of mesh heads on a set of Breakbeats and it's a fine practice kit for working parts out or shedding ideas. It's just enough tone to get a feel for the notes without driving everyone in my family nuts. To me, the full e-kit is fun for its own applications but not worth the money if it's a practice substitute.

To be honest, I thought the dynamic difference between mesh/real would be more of a hinderance but it hasn't been much of an issue.
 

Tymp2002

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E-drums make the perfect practice set!

There is definitely a "feel" difference, so I recommend trying out a few to find the one for you. Some things to keep in mind: e-drums tend to be smaller than acoustic kits and this is an advantage if space is a premium. But to get a more "acoustic" feel; you should look for kits that are more the size you normally play. This is why an acoustic conversion to e-drum is very popular and what I play in my studio. (cymbals excluded - use e-cymbals and/or muted cymbals.) Also, if your budget permits it, get a kit that uses an actual high-hat stand - not a must; just a nice-to-have.

Don't worry about all that hog-wash about how playing e-drums is bad for your technique on acoustic drums. The people saying this have a rubber practice pad or three that they practice on. AND, if you use proper technique; the transition to acoustic is not a big deal. Many drummers warm up back stage on practice pads and/or e-drums.

Yes, acoustic drums have a bigger dynamic range than e-drums. But with sound re-inforcement and amplification this is becoming less important. Also, if you mic your acoustic drums; your sound is being limited by EQ; compression; pre-amps; and such anyway.

More and more drummers are using hybrid setups; and triggers for sound flexibility and even sound re-inforcement. It is the way of the future. And the eventual path to full e-drums on stage. Please don't hate me for my prediction...
 

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