Do other people gear choices and usage bother you?

Esotericdrums

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I could careless the amount of gear someone acquires. But learn to play it, isn’t that the whole point?

You don’t even have to play it that well, none of us are as great as we wish we were, but everyone of us who cares enough about drums to join a forum like this ought to care as much if not more about improving technique, tone and skill than your latest cymbal or drum purchase... their is one particular master member here who I’ve noticed has a tendency to go through gear very fast and seemingly buying and selling cymbals and drums in a constant search for the “perfect” snare or cymbal sound, to the point it seems they buy something they were claiming was THE snare/cymbal they had been searching for only to be selling it off a week or two later... is that even enough time to truly get to know an instrument? I’ll admit that it has crossed my mind that that is borderline becoming a problem, and I hope I never get to that point. When you chase a specific sound out of new gear instead of learning to get the sound you want out of what you have.

i have upgraded my gear quite a bit in the last year. Buying my second drum set in my 17 years of playing and acquiring 5 new cymbals in the last year. Before that my last big gear bing was 4 years ago when I slowly switched out my old As to K’s and K customs. That was my first big upgrade.
 

6topher

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I find it funny that people who often feel compelled to “enlighten others to the wisdom they are so generously willing to bestow on those not blessed with such insight” refrain to participate actively to this thread.

Keep in mind that I use the OP picture very deliberately to stimulate discussion and observe reactions.

Here are my observations:

There are people with the romanticized idea that each gear purchase must play a role in your musical development path to have meaning.

They often make a correlation with gear level and musical development.

They don’t understand that for many people, gear chase, gear information gathering, and gear comparison are part of the fun.

There are some people that are simply jealous or envious; they think that some pieces of gear will be better use by themselves or someone other than the owner.

They are people who just don’t understand eccentricity; People with a mental illness suffer from their behavior, while eccentrics are quite happy.

Glad you got it all wrapped up neat like that. Very perceptive of you.
 

cruddola

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I could careless the amount of gear someone acquires. But learn to play it, isn’t that the whole point?

You don’t even have to play it that well, none of us are as great as we wish we were, but everyone of us who cares enough about drums to join a forum like this ought to care as much if not more about improving technique, tone and skill than your latest cymbal or drum purchase... their is one particular master member here who I’ve noticed has a tendency to go through gear very fast and seemingly buying and selling cymbals and drums in a constant search for the “perfect” snare or cymbal sound, to the point it seems they buy something they were claiming was THE snare/cymbal they had been searching for only to be selling it off a week or two later... is that even enough time to truly get to know an instrument? I’ll admit that it has crossed my mind that that is borderline becoming a problem, and I hope I never get to that point. When you chase a specific sound out of new gear instead of learning to get the sound you want out of what you have.

i have upgraded my gear quite a bit in the last year. Buying my second drum set in my 17 years of playing and acquiring 5 new cymbals in the last year. Before that my last big gear bing was 4 years ago when I slowly switched out my old As to K’s and K customs. That was my first big upgrade.
I agree. I've owned a bunch of kits by different builders. Every tour I went on was with a different brand of kit. 13 different brands over a 40 year period. I'm not a slave to a particular make of drum. Hardware and cymbals, yes. Zildjians, Yamaha hardware and DW/Camco pedals haven't changed in 40 years. Those I never sell. I won't tour wearing the same clothes I wear at home. After every tour I sold off that kit. When hired for another tour I'd buy the next kit tailored for that music. By tailoring, I mean select a kit that will give the tuning range for the music I'm being paid to play. Every kit a used one. Many times what I came up with, the band disapproved. Again, I was hired to come up with a sound/tuning they wanted. There's no such thing as the do-all kit. No such thing. High-end Ames to Sonors, Low end Gretsch to Yamahas. And many in between. I've played professionally on a wide assortment of drum builders that others dream of. I was able to write them off on my taxes. Having said that, I've chosen to retire to a kit that gives me what I want, Not what others want. I'm not saying they're the best ever made. They're not. There's no best either. I chose from all those I've played on in my past that I KNOW best. I chose from all those which one kit would give me the tuning range I love most personally. I'm done professionally. I don't have a warehouse of drums nor would I like to. I have a kit at my sister's house, another at both my brother's houses, another at my nephew's house, another in the truck for impromptu jam sessions and the last in my living room. Again each kit is a different brand except for the Yamaha Stage Custom at my sister's place and the YMCAs in my living room and the Power-V in the truck. Tama and Premier and PDP are also represented. Why? Their tunability is awesome! Better than most high-end brands. I know, I've made a good living playing different brands of high-end drums. I buy on tunability not boutique. I could have bought any new high-end kit many times over upon retirement. I went after tunability. All my siblings have made their bones in music. Expect to play when visiting. I'm an old dude who planned ahead. Don't wanna lug a kit around either to visit family scattered around the nation and Northern Ireland. They all have their special color of sound I love. I will close that the best gear is the gear you have. Respect it and the folks who built it. Do so by playing it and growing with it. Earn the damn things!
 

Esotericdrums

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I agree. I've owned a bunch of kits by different builders. Every tour I went on was with a different brand of kit. 13 different brands over a 40 year period. I'm not a slave to a particular make of drum. Hardware and cymbals, yes. Zildjians, Yamaha hardware and DW/Camco pedals haven't changed in 40 years. Those I never sell. I won't tour wearing the same clothes I wear at home. After every tour I sold off that kit. When hired for another tour I'd buy the next kit tailored for that music. By tailoring, I mean select a kit that will give the tuning range for the music I'm being paid to play. Every kit a used one. Many times what I came up with, the band disapproved. Again, I was hired to come up with a sound/tuning they wanted. There's no such thing as the do-all kit. No such thing. High-end Ames to Sonors, Low end Gretsch to Yamahas. And many in between. I've played professionally on a wide assortment of drum builders that others dream of. I was able to write them off on my taxes. Having said that, I've chosen to retire to a kit that gives me what I want, Not what others want. I'm not saying they're the best ever made. They're not. There's no best either. I chose from all those I've played on in my past that I KNOW best. I chose from all those which one kit would give me the tuning range I love most personally. I'm done professionally. I don't have a warehouse of drums nor would I like to. I have a kit at my sister's house, another at both my brother's houses, another at my nephew's house, another in the truck for impromptu jam sessions and the last in my living room. Again each kit is a different brand except for the Yamaha Stage Custom at my sister's place and the YMCAs in my living room and the Power-V in the truck. Tama and Premier and PDP are also represented. Why? Their tunability is awesome! Better than most high-end brands. I know, I've made a good living playing different brands of high-end drums. I buy on tunability not boutique. I could have bought any new high-end kit many times over upon retirement. I went after tunability. All my siblings have made their bones in music. Expect to play when visiting. I'm an old dude who planned ahead. Don't wanna lug a kit around either to visit family scattered around the nation and Northern Ireland. They all have their special color of sound I love. I will close that the best gear is the gear you have. Respect it and the folks who built it. Do so by playing it and growing with it. Earn the damn things!
Agreed completely! I did the majority of my gigging with my old Gretsch Catalina maple. A beginners kit I bought in high school after first getting into playing on borrowed Pearl Export from my cousin. At that point in time switching from that pearl to low end gretsch as well as his B8s to a set of A Customs was the best thing in the world! And I worked my ass off all summer to buy that kit and those cymbals. I cut my teeth with those and played many a gigs. I was lucky enough to come across a 50s Small stamp ride on a trade from a kid I sold weed too in my young years. Would I ever buy an A custom now? Hell no! But that 10 years those cymbals served me well and I only cared about learning to play better and better. About 13 or so years into my drumming I landed a gig where I was playing 150ish shows a year and I finally started grabbing some K custom cymbals. It started with one and I knew I had to get rid of my A customs. So I bought new cymbals with gig money over the course of a year. Two years ago I built a house for my family and finally had a music room that was permanent. So I bought my first big boy kit and got a Gretsch Brooklyn. While I don’t hold any bad views about other brands because every decent manufacturer makes some line of great drums, I’ve have been 100% happy with my Catalina maples and now my Brooklyn’s so Gretsch has somewhat earned my loyalty. Someday I would love to have a bop sized Broadkaster kit in Black Satin Flame, maybe a USA Custom. But I don’t need that to be happy with where I am at with my drumming. A new badass kit doesn’t make my fills or left hand ghost notes any better. Same with Zildjian I have been happy with most K customs I have bought and more recently K Cons and Keropes so I stick with Zildjian. Doesn’t mean I have anything against other brands but I haven’t yet branched out to that. But at the end of the day, play!!! The vast majority of people including well trained ears aren’t going to hear an amazing, talented drummer and say man his snare or his ride sure does sound like sh*t! But people will notice a drummer with bad time or limited vocabulary on a $5,000 kit and top end cymbals.
 
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cruddola

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Agreed completely! I did the majority of my gigging with my old Gretsch Catalina maple. A beginners kit I bought in high school after first getting into playing on borrowed Pearl Export from my cousin. At that point in time switching from that pearl to low end gretsch as well as his B8s to a set of A Customs was the best thing in the world! And I worked my ass off all summer to buy that kit and those cymbals. I cut my teeth with those and played many a gigs. I was lucky enough to come across a 50s Small stamp ride on a trade from a kid I sold weed too in my young years. Would I ever buy an A custom now? Hell no! But that 10 years those cymbals served me well and I only cared about learning to play better and better. About 13 or so years into my drumming I landed a gig where I was playing 150ish shows a year and I finally started grabbing some K custom cymbals. It started with one and I knew I had to get rid of my A customs. So I bought new cymbals with gig money over the course of a year. Two years ago I built a house for my family and finally had a music room that was permanent. So I bought my first big boy kit and got a Gretsch Brooklyn. While I don’t hold any bad views about other brands because every decent manufacturer makes some line of great drums, I’ve have been 100% happy with my Catalina maples and now my Brooklyn’s so Gretsch has somewhat earned my loyalty. Someday I would love to have a bop sized Broadkaster kit in Black Satin Flame, maybe a USA Custom. But I don’t need that to be happy with where I am at with my drumming. A new badass kit doesn’t make my fills or left hand ghost notes any better. Same with Zildjian I have been happy with most K customs I have bought and more recently K Cons and Keropes so I stick with Zildjian. Doesn’t mean I have anything against other brands but I haven’t yet branched out to that. But at the end of the day, play!!! The vast majority of people including well trained ears aren’t going to hear an amazing, talented drummer and say man his snare or his ride sure does sound like mess! But people will notice a drummer with bad time or limited vocabulary on a $5,000 kit and top end cymbals.
Hell yeah! I gave my niece my Cats (Catalina Maple kit) for her 14th birthday. Her brother was being a dick and not letting her play on his DW collector kit of which I financed half of it. Being the thug I am I asked for my half back due to my condition that it be shared with his sister when the time came. He refused! So I took all his Sabian and Wuhan FX cymbals, their stands and the DW 5000 double pedal and gifted them to his sister. Took him six months to replace them with sub-par gear. She's had that 6-piece kit in her bed room since and she's twice the drummer he is now! I took a rented 4-piece Catalina kit on a short tour of Israel, Jordan, Lebanon and Egypt. I made over eleven grand on that kit. They were astoundingly consistent from drum to drum regardless of tuning range! Sorry DW, Ludwig and Pearl. The week I got home I bought the floor model that my niece currently has at Guitar Center. I down-graded from the previous European tour from a 4-piece Sonor SQ back in 2008 to The Catalina Maple kit for the Middle-eastern tour. They fit in with the music better than the Sonors could ever. The Sonors went to crap on the higher-end of tuning. Consistency transit from drum to drum in terns of tuning sucked with the 14-inch tom. It was one rebellious bastard. Middle-Eastern flavor rock I was hired to play demanded a high-pitched kit. That SQ 14 wasn't giving in. It went flat. The SQ 16floor tom wasn't acceptable either. Exact same-sized drums and the Cats did tons better on overall tuning range. A 600 dollar Cat kit out doing a three-grand kit on the high end! Blasphemy!! Having owned, rented and played so many drum brands from the highest to the lowest in cost, I'll be the first to tell those listening and reading, that most lower and mid-level (Cats ARE mid-level) priced drums in the right tuner's ear and hands will put most High-end priced drums to shame. Go for a full B-caster kit and expand on the Bop-sized B-caster series and you'll NEVER look at another kit! Kinda like a Ludwig Bronze Beauty or an Acro has gone with every kit I've owned (over 30) or rented (over 50), those B-casters will go with anything or genre. Played Punk back in the '80s on my B-casters. Punk bands always paid the best on local gigs. They were nothing short of perfect. Quickest attacking drums and the most unforgiving I've ever played. I had my old-school 1955 B-caster kit at my brother's house. They got stolen and I cried.
 

Esotericdrums

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Hell yeah! I gave my niece my Cats (Catalina Maple kit) for her 14th birthday. Her brother was being a dick and not letting her play on his DW collector kit of which I financed half of it. Being the thug I am I asked for my half back due to my condition that it be shared with his sister when the time came. He refused! So I took all his Sabian and Wuhan FX cymbals, their stands and the DW 5000 double pedal and gifted them to his sister. Took him six months to replace them with sub-par gear. She's had that 6-piece kit in her bed room since and she's twice the drummer he is now! I took a rented 4-piece Catalina kit on a short tour of Israel, Jordan, Lebanon and Egypt. I made over eleven grand on that kit. They were astoundingly consistent from drum to drum regardless of tuning range! Sorry DW, Ludwig and Pearl. The week I got home I bought the floor model that my niece currently has at Guitar Center. I down-graded from the previous European tour from a 4-piece Sonor SQ back in 2008 to The Catalina Maple kit for the Middle-eastern tour. They fit in with the music better than the Sonors could ever. The Sonors went to crap on the higher-end of tuning. Consistency transit from drum to drum in terns of tuning sucked with the 14-inch tom. It was one rebellious bastard. Middle-Eastern flavor rock I was hired to play demanded a high-pitched kit. That SQ 14 wasn't giving in. It went flat. The SQ 16floor tom wasn't acceptable either. Exact same-sized drums and the Cats did tons better on overall tuning range. A 600 dollar Cat kit out doing a three-grand kit on the high end! Blasphemy!! Having owned, rented and played so many drum brands from the highest to the lowest in cost, I'll be the first to tell those listening and reading, that most lower and mid-level (Cats ARE mid-level) priced drums in the right tuner's ear and hands will put most High-end priced drums to shame. Go for a full B-caster kit and expand on the Bop-sized B-caster series and you'll NEVER look at another kit! Kinda like a Ludwig Bronze Beauty or an Acro has gone with every kit I've owned (over 30) or rented (over 50), those B-casters will go with anything or genre. Played Punk back in the '80s on my B-casters. Punk bands always paid the best on local gigs. They were nothing short of perfect. Quickest attacking drums and the most unforgiving I've ever played. I had my old-school 1955 B-caster kit at my brother's house. They got stolen and I cried.
That’s horrible about the 55 Broadkasters :( the reason I want to do a bop Bkaster kit is my other 2 are rock sizes 22,10,12,16. I think a bop kit would be a nice change. it’s funny you say that about the Ludwigs because my single work horse snare I own is a Ludwig 14x8 Oak/Maple hybrid. I still have my old Catalina stock snare sitting with a broken lug.
 

cruddola

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That’s horrible about the 55 Broadkasters :( the reason I want to do a bop Bkaster kit is my other 2 are rock sizes 22,10,12,16. I think a bop kit would be a nice change. it’s funny you say that about the Ludwigs because my single work horse snare I own is a Ludwig 14x8 Oak/Maple hybrid. I still have my old Catalina stock snare sitting with a broken lug.
 

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I was referring to the four different Ludwig kits (and colors) I've owned over 5 decades regarding tuning consistency in drum to drum transit within the kit. Not snares. Personally, I can't and wouldn't criticize ANY drum I've never played be they owned, rented or borrowed by me long term. Only an idiot would do that. Coming back to snares, I have only owned Bronze Beauties and Arcos. That's it. My first kit and only new kit was a 5-piece Slingerland Radio-King in Gold Sparkle. It came with a Ludwig Acro. 388 bucks back then. I have seven Acros. That was the only kit and snare the store carried when I bought them back in 1963. The first of the seven Bronze beauty was purchased in 1989. I've got kits of different makes scattered all over the country and another at my oldest sister's house in Derry, Northern Ireland. Each and every kit has a Bronze Beauty and an Acro regardless of drum kit brand (Bass and toms). Those two snares have filled every one of my needs since the '70s and '80s. Be it Country, Rock, Mexican Cactus Music, Polka, Improv Jazz, Big band, Classical, Blues, Motown, Middle-eastern and European cultural, etc. I've been able to get what I needed from just those two snares. I know them best and that's why I've always stayed with them. I show up to a gig and play on their drums. That does NOT count enough to make a valid judgement. I've always taken MY snares. I believe 100% what ANY drummer tells of their drums including YOU! It's gotta be a killer drum otherwise it wouldn't have been chosen as your money-shot drum. Who am I ,or anyone to judge that? I've never owned one or played one long term in my life! Anyone would be a frigging idiot to judge. Anyhow, get a 14. The tunability transit from the 12 to the 14 and then to 16 will be as smooth as heaven. If you do any Improv Jazz the 14 will fit mighty nice as the floor tom. That's what I did. You won't regret it! Drum On!
 
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cruddola

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Maybe you can talk to Bun Carlos. I'm sure he has a few sets around that don't get played.
Yeah, but Carlos has the key elements to having such a collection. He's a great drummer, has respect for the instrument and their builders, and he has the dough for it.
 

dale w miller

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Agreed completely! I did the majority of my gigging with my old Gretsch Catalina maple. A beginners kit I bought in high school after first getting into playing on borrowed Pearl Export from my cousin. At that point in time switching from that pearl to low end gretsch as well as his B8s to a set of A Customs was the best thing in the world! And I worked my ass off all summer to buy that kit and those cymbals. I cut my teeth with those and played many a gigs. I was lucky enough to come across a 50s Small stamp ride on a trade from a kid I sold weed too in my young years. Would I ever buy an A custom now? Hell no! But that 10 years those cymbals served me well and I only cared about learning to play better and better. About 13 or so years into my drumming I landed a gig where I was playing 150ish shows a year and I finally started grabbing some K custom cymbals. It started with one and I knew I had to get rid of my A customs. So I bought new cymbals with gig money over the course of a year. Two years ago I built a house for my family and finally had a music room that was permanent. So I bought my first big boy kit and got a Gretsch Brooklyn. While I don’t hold any bad views about other brands because every decent manufacturer makes some line of great drums, I’ve have been 100% happy with my Catalina maples and now my Brooklyn’s so Gretsch has somewhat earned my loyalty. Someday I would love to have a bop sized Broadkaster kit in Black Satin Flame, maybe a USA Custom. But I don’t need that to be happy with where I am at with my drumming. A new badass kit doesn’t make my fills or left hand ghost notes any better. Same with Zildjian I have been happy with most K customs I have bought and more recently K Cons and Keropes so I stick with Zildjian. Doesn’t mean I have anything against other brands but I haven’t yet branched out to that. But at the end of the day, play!!! The vast majority of people including well trained ears aren’t going to hear an amazing, talented drummer and say man his snare or his ride sure does sound like sh*t! But people will notice a drummer with bad time or limited vocabulary on a $5,000 kit and top end cymbals.
Hell yeah! I gave my niece my Cats (Catalina Maple kit) for her 14th birthday. Her brother was being a dick and not letting her play on his DW collector kit of which I financed half of it. Being the thug I am I asked for my half back due to my condition that it be shared with his sister when the time came. He refused! So I took all his Sabian and Wuhan FX cymbals, their stands and the DW 5000 double pedal and gifted them to his sister. Took him six months to replace them with sub-par gear. She's had that 6-piece kit in her bed room since and she's twice the drummer he is now! I took a rented 4-piece Catalina kit on a short tour of Israel, Jordan, Lebanon and Egypt. I made over eleven grand on that kit. They were astoundingly consistent from drum to drum regardless of tuning range! Sorry DW, Ludwig and Pearl. The week I got home I bought the floor model that my niece currently has at Guitar Center. I down-graded from the previous European tour from a 4-piece Sonor SQ back in 2008 to The Catalina Maple kit for the Middle-eastern tour. They fit in with the music better than the Sonors could ever. The Sonors went to crap on the higher-end of tuning. Consistency transit from drum to drum in terns of tuning sucked with the 14-inch tom. It was one rebellious bastard. Middle-Eastern flavor rock I was hired to play demanded a high-pitched kit. That SQ 14 wasn't giving in. It went flat. The SQ 16floor tom wasn't acceptable either. Exact same-sized drums and the Cats did tons better on overall tuning range. A 600 dollar Cat kit out doing a three-grand kit on the high end! Blasphemy!! Having owned, rented and played so many drum brands from the highest to the lowest in cost, I'll be the first to tell those listening and reading, that most lower and mid-level (Cats ARE mid-level) priced drums in the right tuner's ear and hands will put most High-end priced drums to shame. Go for a full B-caster kit and expand on the Bop-sized B-caster series and you'll NEVER look at another kit! Kinda like a Ludwig Bronze Beauty or an Acro has gone with every kit I've owned (over 30) or rented (over 50), those B-casters will go with anything or genre. Played Punk back in the '80s on my B-casters. Punk bands always paid the best on local gigs. They were nothing short of perfect. Quickest attacking drums and the most unforgiving I've ever played. I had my old-school 1955 B-caster kit at my brother's house. They got stolen and I cried.
Paragraphs are your friends, guys. :)
 

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When I went down the gear hole, a big part of why was the adrenaline shot it gave my playing. You sit down with something new and there’s an instant enthusiasm. The problem, one that I noticed fairly quickly, was that this enthusiasm, while welcome, served a replication of stuff I’d played already played to death in my practice routines. You play what you already know on something new, rather than learning something new to play on what you already have. It’s a huge detour from progress that ultimately limits forward momentum.
 

DamnSingerAlsoDrums

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I'm not really bothered that much by what brands/models others play or don't play. I've seen amazing players make turds sing and not so great players make priceless gear sound like turds. I am sadly closer to the later.

I have to confess having a slight bias against some brands.

I tend to percieve (rightly so or not, I don't know) the Asian brands as technically faultless products, but lacking a certain intangible flair and/or mystique. For the genres I'm playing anyway (in the americana/roots vein). Just like their cars, motorcycles, guitars and so many other things. For instance: Yamaha cruiser bikes are, by almost any measurable metric, quantifiably better than pretty much all Harleys. But no one feels like a "Rebel" riding one... They do have terrific performance bikes though, made for hi-speed and surgical precision. I kinda feel the same way about their drums, and Pearls and Tamas as well.

Although I must admit, when shopping for my Gretsch kit, just for kicks (no pun intended) I tried a couple sets in the Starclassic series, both had finishes to die for and tone for days! It sort of made it hard to justify paying a whole lot more for a Broadkaster set. Then again, the same can be said for the cheaper Brooklyn series that held its own pretty well against its pricier big bro. But at the end of the day, "that great Gretsch sound" won. Even at equal price, we don't always just buy an instrument, we buy into a lineage, a story and the Gretsch legacy is closer to my musical universe than Tama is.

We all want nice things, and most of us with the means actually do buy some, me included, more than they really need... And that's OK.

Although if I'm being frank, I am a little uneasy with unbriddled hoarding. Coming from the world of guitar, I can totally agree with the statement that collectors and hoarders ruined the market for the working musicians. But ultimatelly, any form of heavy hoarding is sort of unsettling to me. But although it saddens me to think about all the awesome gear that sit in cases in some storage units/basements/closets, never to be played or being even looked at, it is still far better than being torn down for parts by some auction site rascals...

Do I own superflous pieces of gear? Yes I do, but most of them see some action "on the reg". The guitars, amps, pedals and miscelaneous audio stuff I don't use are usually loaned to my brother's studio where they get played/recorded at least once in a while. Do I own drumming gear of quality that far surpasses my skill level? Again yes. Do I have more fun and more motivation for getting better and progress my meager skillset while playing on my rare vintage or brand spanking new hi-end sets than I did on a mid-level asian set? Heck yes!
 
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wayne

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Interesting comments. Anything goes for me as a rule EXCEPT people who insist they know more than anyone else simply due to the amount of high end gear they own or have owned, when it comes to percussion. Entitled people as a rule tend to lord over others regarding just about anything from cars to clothes to restaurants, so i need to bite my tongue a lot around here. I,m getting better.
Only drum shop owners that schmooze preferred customers, annoy me more because these folks have to buy the drums somewhere. They trip over themselves rolling out the red carpet for them....while they pay little attention to the dad looking at the Export kit for his youngster..Actually, they wont likely carry something along the lines of an Export, would they?

It has nothing to do with anyones choice of what or how much. Its all about the arrogance and false signals some of them send. ..Nothing more.
 
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dale w miller

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Come to think about it, I don’t care about what people play, I care about what vintage gear they hoard. I see many people with these old drums that you know they aren’t using them to fullest as they have a lot of them. Some people even have multiple copies of the same exact drum.

I know this is against the grain here with so many people having a large collection and maybe even hypocritical considering my collection of modern drums that I bought new, but these vintage instruments are meant to be played not sit bagged up in a room.
 

Old PIT Guy

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Keep in mind that I use the OP picture very deliberately to stimulate discussion and observe reactions.
Yes, but isn't that your stuff?
singleflammedmill said:
Here are my observations:

There are people with the romanticized idea that each gear purchase must play a role in your musical development path to have meaning.
They often make a correlation with gear level and musical development.
They don’t understand that for many people, gear chase, gear information gathering, and gear comparison are part of the fun.
There are some people that are simply jealous or envious; they think that some pieces of gear will be better use by themselves or someone other than the owner.
They are people who just don’t understand eccentricity; People with a mental illness suffer from their behavior, while eccentrics are quite happy.
I guess I'm of the "people" in this mini-rant. All of these justifications are apparently based on a perception of what some people may think about your collection.

I'm not judging in my posts on an individual level. What I wrote were generalities that I think apply to more people than not. I don't know who is eccentric and who isn't. To me, exceedingly large collections of similar things, any things, are ostentatious and meant to impress others, otherwise the internet wouldn't be littered with pictures of them. Whether someone thinks negatively about that is up to them.

And yes, there are people very happy with their collections who do enjoy playing the drums quite often, but there are also people who persist an uncontrollable urge to purchase musical instruments that will rarely be played, some not at all. I've seen guys who run out of room in their homes and shift to storage lockers for more room. And so there's a spectrum that requires consideration.
 

karlcrafton

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I love "gear".
I really have zero to say about what anyone buys, or how they use it.
I "like" or gravitate toward certain things, but that's aesthetic based, and everyone does that.

Little things have drawn me in--like the old Rogers hi hat clutch that was used by everyone in the late 60's early 70's.
I just always thought it was the coolest looking piece, with that "wing" looking T bolt tightener... haha!

To this day, my favorite "looking" kits are still a 4 piece, or 1 up, 2 down Club Date style kits with minimal cymbals--
What did that was I was blown away by seeing Mel Taylor getting all that sound out of a 4 piece kit and ONE cymbal!

I also did the Neil Peart, Alex Van Halen, Tommy Aldridge style kits too. Throw in the Carmine double chinas in there too haha! Carmine's Maple Ludwig Realistic Rock kit was a HUGE favorite too.

As far as set ups, how someone places, or angles something is fine by me because THEY have to be comfortable with it. They also have to lug it around if they gig. I used a 28" bass drum for over 10 years--until I got tired of hauling it. Now I just use a 26....a 24 for recording.

My stuff would probably bug some people, but that's not my problem.
I mainly use shorter, double butt sticks (15", various diams), and don't really use a "ride" cymbal a lot of the time haha!
WTF? NO TIP on the stick?!? ...Yeah, well, when I was a kid, I had strictly snare drum lessons for about 5 years and I think I still know how to get what I want from a(ny) stick haha!
My tipped sticks have a large, bulb tip and a sloped neck in various diams, and are 15.5" long.
Leroy Aaron Rhodes has made my sticks (he's on facebook) almost 4 years now, and he's been getting quite a few BIG named guys lately.
 


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