Do other people gear choices and usage bother you?

JDA

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Just occurred to me ; Folks that collect drums and Folks that Sell as a profession drums, both..
have a ..wait for it

"store"
 

senecaty

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This is interesting, especially the piece on rankism. It reminds me of the vibe on most Facebook drum groups, where fellas put up “look at me” posts, or comment on others’ pictures with their own. It’s all to satisfy the ol ego.

As long as you're happy buying/playing whatever gear you want to play, then I’m happy. You do you.

Though I do have two faults: I might cringe a bit (see: judge) at poorly tuned drums AND when I see beautiful drum rooms with multiple kits on display, I can’t help but think of the dust.
 
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Vintage Old School

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Other people's gear choices and how they use their gear has zero bearing on how I view them or their gear. To each their own. I actually enjoy seeing what other people use and hearing why they chose their gear. A number of players have provided me with a wealth of information
that I never would have acquired without their perspective and input. I can actually live vicariously through their purchases and acquisitions. The truth of the matter is I look at it in the same manner as those who support the arts. Anybody who supports the music business is doing
us all a favor through their drum and gear purchases. We need to support our manufacturers and our vendors. They deserve to stay afloat in their pursuit of craftsmanship.

That being said if you're fortunate enough to walk on this earth 50, 60, 70 "plus" years and continue playing drums you will more than likely go through some degree of evolution regarding your gear selection and usage. I choose what works for me and what brings me the greatest
sense of joy and satisfaction. A lot of my tastes aren't even on other people's radar. And with every decade that passes the more I learn the more it impacts what I play and how I approach playing it.

I will say that one of the benefits of having a variety of gear to rotate in and out of your setup is that it sparks creativity in how you look at things and in how you approach things differently. Sometimes it gets you out of a rut and opens up new options and ideas that tunnel vision may
have been constraining you.

Play what you want to play and don't worry one iota what others say or think. Thank goodness we have the freedom of choice. Enjoy what you have, but more importantly enjoy the journey.
 

Sammybear

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Regarding the subject matter of this thread, and perhaps expressed in other sentiments, I am reminded of an old platitude: "If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away." - Henry David Thoreau
 

Corbin L Douthitt

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On every forum or group, there are always people that seem really bother by other people gear choices and usage.

For me, every dollar spent in the drum industry is a dollar well spent and each person can spend their money any way they want.

I don’t mind if a hobbyist who can’t play a straight beat to save his life buys a 27 pieces Sonor SQ2 to put in his beach house, even if that kit is played once a year.
I don’t even mind if you buy a drum just to look at it.
Also, I don’t mind if a pro who choose to play a Pearl Export with the matching snare.

But some people do, and I want to know why.

The stereotype is often an old jazz drummer way past his prime who whine about boutique drums not being played on gigs and who try (usually with no success at all) to discourage people of collecting drums.


Music Room
I get you. What I ‘hear’ is “ somebody has better gear than I can afford, and it doesn’t even get played !” I got bit by the collecting bug in the late 90’s. Had 3kits, 21 snares and who knows how many cymbals. I liked wood shells, natural or stained finish ( sound). Only had one covered kit, traded it. Currently have 1 13x3 Slingerland BR copy in WMP and a DynaSonic that was red glass glittee until a guitar player skinned it. I had it covered in a non Rogers wrap. Eventually started selling off the snares. Getting old. No one else I know is interested in them- time to divest. So , yes I am an offender. I have stuff I don’t play. Stuff some young starving drummer would go nuts over- if I gave it away. But I already tried that once. Virtually gave away a 7 pc Premier XPK, to a friends kid. Now he plays guitar and wants to be a sound engineer. Maybe the kit will end up in his studio in 10-20 years?
 

David M Scott

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On every forum or group, there are always people that seem really bother by other people gear choices and usage.

For me, every dollar spent in the drum industry is a dollar well spent and each person can spend their money any way they want.

I don’t mind if a hobbyist who can’t play a straight beat to save his life buys a 27 pieces Sonor SQ2 to put in his beach house, even if that kit is played once a year.
I don’t even mind if you buy a drum just to look at it.
Also, I don’t mind if a pro who choose to play a Pearl Export with the matching snare.

But some people do, and I want to know why.

The stereotype is often an old jazz drummer way past his prime who whine about boutique drums not being played on gigs and who try (usually with no success at all) to discourage people of collecting drums.


Music Room
Your absolutely correct. I happen to be 81 and old school in that when I buy a new kit, snare, cymbal whatever, I sell off it's equivalent but I certainly don't eschew others who have multi and play the
big brands even if they're not what turns my crank. As you say it's their money. What does wrankle me are the purists who think that if you don't play them you are less than intelligent and if you don't have at least 10 snares that your probably not a real drummer. Thankfully there are very few on this forum. But if having equipment is your thing then by all means show it because I really think it's wonderful.
 

Bandit

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I want to hear the Saturn that doesn't make the cut in your collection.
 

DamnSingerAlsoDrums

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I live about a half hour drive from where Unix drums are made. Too bad I wasn't aware they were a local product before I splurged on the Gretsch BK set. I would have gladly at least given these a try. Although I love me some wrapped tubs. And wrapping some high end boutique stave drums would definitely be heresy!! I'd probably be booted the hell out of the shop just for asking :blink: :violent1::lol:

My drums used to (and hopefully will again soon) be essentially used live and must fit into a certain retro aesthetics to blend with the rest of my band's gear, consisting of early 60's Echolette amps and Harmony guitars. Hence the Rogers' Red Onyx wrap and the Gretsch BK's Red Glass. They look amazing next to the gold casings of the Echolettes...

Those kits in your samples sound great tho...
 

wayne

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Hey white boy!!!Play that funky music!
nice playing, and it gives credibility to your drums.
 

roguefate

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Whatever someone buys and plays (or not), is their choice. It's really that simple. Personally, if someone collects a variety of kits, cymbals, individual drums, etc. It think that is just awesome. Do extensive collections perhaps insult practicality? Almost surely. But then again, who is anyone to judge in the first place?

When I was younger, my second-hand Tama mix and match double-bass kit held together with duct tape and a prayer inspired me to dream of owning a huge kickass setup like Lars Ulrich or Dave Lombardo. Now I have two of them (Tama Granstar Custom and 1980s Swingstar) complete with power toms and rack cages. It's taken me twenty five plus years to build them out. Actually, I'm still working on it - LOL. I don't know if I'll ever gig with the full complement but I typically bring more gear than most to shows anyhow. I'm sure there's judgement (occasionally) but neither do I care.

In the end, like what you like, want what you want, and if you can afford to own it then have at it!

Drums are like cowbells. What did "THE Bruce Dickinson" say? You can never have enough.

:happy7::headbang::happy8:
 

Vinnie Kay

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On every forum or group, there are always people that seem really bother by other people gear choices and usage.

For me, every dollar spent in the drum industry is a dollar well spent and each person can spend their money any way they want.

I don’t mind if a hobbyist who can’t play a straight beat to save his life buys a 27 pieces Sonor SQ2 to put in his beach house, even if that kit is played once a year.
I don’t even mind if you buy a drum just to look at it.
Also, I don’t mind if a pro who choose to play a Pearl Export with the matching snare.

But some people do, and I want to know why.

The stereotype is often an old jazz drummer way past his prime who whine about boutique drums not being played on gigs and who try (usually with no success at all) to discourage people of collecting drums.


Music Room
I could easily dump 2 of these kits. I was playing in 3 different bands and to save time and work, I’d leave a kit at each rehearsal spot. Now it’s down to one band and I don’t need the clutter. Maybe it’s too many kits for some, but it made my life easier and playing a lot more enjoyable. Personally I don’t care what kind of drums anyone plays or chooses to buy. I have one fantastic vintage Gretsch kit early 1960’s Broadkaster that I play at gigs. Otherwise I have low priced kits that I have made to sound good with heads, tuning and muffs. Keep practicing, that’s da mess!!
 

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Slingwig26

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On every forum or group, there are always people that seem really bother by other people gear choices and usage.

For me, every dollar spent in the drum industry is a dollar well spent and each person can spend their money any way they want.

I don’t mind if a hobbyist who can’t play a straight beat to save his life buys a 27 pieces Sonor SQ2 to put in his beach house, even if that kit is played once a year.
I don’t even mind if you buy a drum just to look at it.
Also, I don’t mind if a pro who choose to play a Pearl Export with the matching snare.

But some people do, and I want to know why.

The stereotype is often an old jazz drummer way past his prime who whine about boutique drums not being played on gigs and who try (usually with no success at all) to discourage people of collecting drums.


Music Room
I don’t care what people use. You use what works for you. I may not like what you play because it doesn’t feel right or sound right to me , but someone else may love it and not like my set up. I always hated power toms but would end up playing them if it was a backline kit, same with 18” depth bass drums. Hate ‘em. They don’t feel right to me, but other people swear by them. It doesn’t bother me that, say, Simon Phillips has always used them.
 

Classic Drummer

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On every forum or group, there are always people that seem really bother by other people gear choices and usage.

For me, every dollar spent in the drum industry is a dollar well spent and each person can spend their money any way they want.

I don’t mind if a hobbyist who can’t play a straight beat to save his life buys a 27 pieces Sonor SQ2 to put in his beach house, even if that kit is played once a year.
I don’t even mind if you buy a drum just to look at it.
Also, I don’t mind if a pro who choose to play a Pearl Export with the matching snare.

But some people do, and I want to know why.

The stereotype is often an old jazz drummer way past his prime who whine about boutique drums not being played on gigs and who try (usually with no success at all) to discourage people of collecting drums.


Music Room
On every forum or group, there are always people that seem really bother by other people gear choices and usage.

For me, every dollar spent in the drum industry is a dollar well spent and each person can spend their money any way they want.

I don’t mind if a hobbyist who can’t play a straight beat to save his life buys a 27 pieces Sonor SQ2 to put in his beach house, even if that kit is played once a year.
I don’t even mind if you buy a drum just to look at it.
Also, I don’t mind if a pro who choose to play a Pearl Export with the matching snare.

But some people do, and I want to know why.

The stereotype is often an old jazz drummer way past his prime who whine about boutique drums not being played on gigs and who try (usually with no success at all) to discourage people of collecting drums.


Music Room
If one thinks of drums as beautiful art, it's fairly easy to justify for an old guy like me. 1960s era Ludwig kits, particularly Hollywoods are my weakness. If you wore out Ludwig catalogs as a kid dreaming of them; then purchased and paid off a set in the 60s at $5 to $20 per gig with your cover band as a teen and grew up to have some extra coin from a lifetime of hard work; being able to click an eBay button and have every finish on the 60s sample chain show up at your house can be as gratifying as purchasing a piece of art. Sure, I still play and gig some and sure I keep half a dozen kits in various finishes cased and tuned in top condition ready to play; but that doesn't justify the 27 or so kits that fill my basement and off-site storage. My only excuse is that I love them. The way they sound, the way they set up so perfectly for my size and playing style, how they look, how they smell -- take the head off of a tom, inhale and see what I mean -- the keystone badge, the script logo, the white interiors, on and on. As a side note, I began collecting around the turn of the century when prices were much lower so they've also turned out to be a decent investment, but that wasn't the idea. I hear that Rob Cook's Chicago Drum Show returns this year and I've had the pleasure of meeting hundreds of drummers in the aisles who are as crazy and in love with our instruments as me. My advice to all, live and let live. Be thankful that we're the ones able to make a joyful noise on these wonderful tubs.
 

Old Drummer

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I'm not terribly bothered by other people's gear choices, but I do recoil over the way some people confuse brand names, more expensive gear, or more heavy duty hardware with better drumming. I think they're being suckered in by marketing departments. Of course, this isn't unique to drumming. Look at the other stuff people buy and you'll find the same thing.

The only time I'm genuinely bothered by other people's gear choices is when the other people are parents who insist on buying their kids expensive gear that no way the kids are good enough to appreciate. This is instilling the wrong values into children.

Collectors are the last people who bother me. That's a whole different orientation, and I have zero problem with it.

I confess though to admiring drummers who stick to basic, quality gear, but ignore the latest snob fashions.

In one of his books years ago, the economist Robert Reich noted that in general the higher the status of a job, the shorter the job title, until at the top the job title is shortened to an acronym, CEO.

I find myself thinking that a similar rule of thumb may apply to gear, especially cymbals. I actually have a Murat Diril Superior Velvet Ride. Look at how long that name is. It reeks of marketing. To me, there's a lot more real status in playing an A or a K or at least an Agop than a cymbal with a name that long.

It's not a hard and fast rule, and there are lots of exceptions (such as DW, which doesn't impress me), but in general the more words it takes to describe your gear, the more you've descended into the rabbit hole of consumerism and the farther you've strayed from drumming.
 

Kevinpursuit

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No bearing on me! I have heard some really old gear being held together with band aides being played like no other, and being miked properly just sound kick ass. I hold no judgement either way, unless its a know it all with an ego out his butt! Otherwords character speaks louder than chosen equipment!
 
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DanRH

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And now I’m headed to the Marketplace section. I need more drums!!!!!!
 


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