do you have the same ability as me?????

bon viesta

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the ability to gauge a song’s release date by the drum sound. not the guitar sound, not the bass sound, not the amount of cigarettes you can hear the singer has smoked, the drum sound. even since i picked up bass as my main instrument, every single song has been accurately (by decade, a few year margin of error) dated depending on what the drums sound like. ringy overhead? early to mid 60s. tight and slightly ringy snare drum? late 60s early 70s. punchy concert tom sound with that signature dry snare sound? mid to late 70s. more hi-fi snare sound, with or without gated reverb? 80s. etc etc etc. with a few exceptions here and there. anyone else realized they can do this??? obviously it’s not really an “ability”, that was sort of a lame joke. it’s more of an interesting factoid about how drums are such a tell-tale sign of when a song or album was recorded and produced and sent out into the stores.
 
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Tilter

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Ebb and flow. It won't be long before tight, cracking snare drums begin to creep their way back in to replace the current trend of fat and loose.
 

charlesm

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There are people out there who have an acute ear for the history of production trends and their quintessential sonics. As one such audio/production geek (to some degree), I also find those trends interesting and fascinating. If you know your production history, it's not hard to pinpoint when certain pieces of music were recorded.

In the last 10 years, especially, there's been a kinda fun trend in really trying to duplicate the vibe of '60s and '70s recordings in a serious way. You can hear this in a lot of newer indie old-school funk and soul artists. Some of these releases are really nailing the feeling, to the degree that it can sometimes fool you into thinking that something is a lot older than it really is.

The same trend has been happening with '80s sonics for a while and seems to be picking up steam. Check out the new John Mayer single:

 

BobDrummer

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I prefer the tight, crispy snare to the fat, loose snare all day long.
 

Deafmoon

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Oddly for me, I can do it more with keys. I love that 60’s/ 70’s Hammond organ sound running through a Leslie cabinet, 70’s Rhodes Piano, Moog synth & ARPs & that huge chorus of Prophets. I guess each era has its on characteristics. And that said, the last 20 years have been…? ‍♂
 

marc3k

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the ability to gauge a song’s release date by the drum sound. not the guitar sound, not the bass sound, not the amount of cigarettes you can hear the singer has smoked, the drum sound. even since i picked up bass as my main instrument, every single song has been accurately (by decade, a few year margin of error) dated depending on what the drums sound like. ringy overhead? early to mid 60s. tight and and slightly ringy snare drum? late 60s early 70s. punchy concert tom sound with that signature dry snare sound? mid to late 70s. more hi-fi snare sound, with or without gated reverb? 80s. etc etc etc. with a few exceptions here and there. anyone else realized they can do this??? obviously it’s not really an “ability”, that was sort of a lame joke. it’s more of an interesting factoid about how drums are such a tell-tale sign of when a song or album was recorded and produced and sent out into the stores.
Yes! That's why I don't like a lot of music past the late 60s early 70s - I have particularly hard times listening to songs from the 80s because of that drum sound you accurately described.
 

Pat A Flafla

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The last 20 years can be tricky, since people now sometimes imitate sounds from other eras. I will also say that producers/engineers since the 80s (nearly my entire life) never seemed to understand that just because you can, doesn't mean you should.
 

bon viesta

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absolutely true that modern songs are more difficult because of the attempt to duplicate drum sounds or tones.
 


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