Do you think kids practice more today because of You Tube?

Pat A Flafla

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Another weird pothole in the youtube drumming culture road is people who put out great fishbowl performance vids but never play live. That's very odd to me. Could they even pull off a set? Maybe. Probably. I don't know.
 

swarfrat

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A big weakness of youtube right now is the weaponization of the algorithm. Youtube has incentivized longer videos, like, subscribe, notification. So literally every video out there spends a couple minutes telling you to do just that. And people get up and ramble without a script. Even the ones who are organized still take 10x longer than they need to say it. Because there's disincentive to make it short.

Remember how much "better" TV got when we went from 3 channels to 500? Then 5000? Youtube makes it 50,000,000. My apsie kid likes to watch youtube, preferring it to written and directed shows. He's finally started to get bored after watching like every idiot ever ramble about lego builds. We're like here kid how about this half hour show that like 30 people worked on for 6 months to make into a presentable story, rather than some idiot with a gopro ramble in front of his Lego build. The problem is that it cuts the legs out from under people trying to put the work into it.
 

Tornado

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Another weird pothole in the youtube drumming culture is people who put out great fishbowl performance vids but never play live. That's very weird to me.
For a very large portion of the world, there is literally no place for them to play. Even in the places in the USA that have live venues (ever shrinking numbers still), most of the gigs are locked up by old dudes playing old music to old people. Only a select handful of cities aren't like that. It's not the way it used to be when most of this board was young.

However, some have used their channels to land opportunities. 66Samus' (Sam Paulicelli) channel got him on a Devin Townsend record. Gabe Helguera got the gig with "I Prevail" after being referred to audition by the sound guy at the church he was playing at. Gabe's main visibility though was his educational channel "Drum Beats Online", which a quick glance at shows you that he can really play. The thing is, these are both young guy trying to do something in the 2010s and 2020's. It's not the same world most of this board knew in the 70s and 80s.
 

5 Style

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Not if they're like me! I watch that stuff sometimes and I think, "yeah, that's cool, I'll have to remember to try that next time I'm behind the kit." Then, when I'm actually at the kit, I either forget what I've watched or forget that I even watched something that I wanted to try...
 

JimmySticks

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Saw this and wanted to give my personal input. I started trying to learn music about two years ago, I'm almost 19 now. I had to use youtube at first because I had no other resource. I'm not going to lie it has taught me a ton, and I've discovered aspects about music, and many amazing musicians I may not have without it. That being said, I was trying to use youtube as a teacher, because I didn't know where to look for one. Since I had so much access to information I thought I was making a lot of progress but I really wasn't. With youtube, you have the whole world at your fingertips... but it's always someone else's world. All that time viewing someone else's practice methods or tips is time that could be spent exploring your instrument yourself which is 10X better. I got sucked into watching literally thousands of videos about teaching, playing, everything but none of that made me a better musician. Also, there's a wealth of either invaluable or straight up wrong information/teaching methods because anyone can put what they want out there. In terms of learning jazz piano, most of the past 6 months has been unlearning the previous 6 months of B.S. I took from youtube.. which was incredibly frustrating and demoralizing at times. Another problem with some of the content is that much of it is made just for the sake of more content. I respect the youtube hustle, it's something I couldn't do, but it creates problems when a video is being made for a weekly or daily video schedule rather than for the real lesson behind it, if you're curious just check out the most popular youtube 'music teachers'. This leads us to another problem, which lies in youtube's algorithms, or however they're judging who sees a video. Most of the videos and channels that are recommended and shown at the top are the most popular.. meaning a large mass of people follow them.. meaning the information tends to be really general and just not useful. I'm having difficulty explaining this part because it is really just something you experience while trying to do what I was. Seeing the same stuff over and over recycled with a different thumbnail and really providing no further room for improvement. It's like swimming around in a glass fishbowl, thinking you're crossing the pacific.

This is running a bit long so I'll wrap up. Can youtube replace a teacher? Hell no. Can youtube in very small chunks be of use? Yes (my advice: only use youtube when you have a question.. look it up.. find one or two promising videos and then get out of there before you're sucked into the vortex) Do I think kids today practice more with youtube? From my experience, absolutely not. I have wasted so so many hours on info I never applied. It's better to work on one thing for a week then spend a month watching youtube videos.. and I spent about a year doing that. My new philosophy on practice has been I don't need to know the perfect things to practice, in fact I have no desire to come close, all I need to do is stay consistent, stay focused, and the growth will take care of itself. I look back on the 'youtube days' with a bit of disgust as I had developed an attention span shorter than that of a goldfish, but it makes me appreciate the power of focus so much more. I'd love to hear from someone with a similar experience.
I said pretty much the same in my post, #32 in this thread, but you articulated my feelings even better. Nicely said!
 

jansara

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I practiced to LPs and music books.

Do you think kids today practice more when you can pull up just about anything online and often on video?
They might not practice more but they're exposed to as much bad playing as they are good, maybe more. For every good video on YT there are probably a dozen or more by amateurs, hobbyists and wannabe's who perpetuate bad habits.
 

FlowTom

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A few years back, our middle school band director wanted his kids to do something a bit special at the regionals.
He pulled out some Duke Ellington charts and had the kids watch clips of the Ellington band on YT. Especially the sax section.
The kids practiced hard, did a good job and blew people away with their rendition of the lush Ellington sound.
A good middle school education: you put the time in and people really appreciate it, and now you know who Duke Ellington was.
 

MusicianMagic

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You've heard of or remember "Paint by Numbers." Today it is "Play by Numbers."

Most learn by tabs or watching a video teaching them to play not by note. This goes for guitar, bass, keys, too. Then go post a video on IG, FB or Tim Tok playing that cover. They miss rudiments, theory, sense of feeling entirely. If you can learn to paint the Mona Lisa this way perfectly, it does not lead to anything but further copying.

I've met or spoken with a few of the popular YouTube cover players (drums, guitar & bass) and most have had teachers oddly enough. One of the most popular YouTube drummers playing covers (many of her videos have millions of views) I met when she was playing in a original band with a CD released. She really didn't cut it. The bass player had better time. (I really wanted to suggest using a click track) She also was overplaying at times, bashing which stepped on the vocals. She's known for that on YouTube tho. A few months later she was fired from the band. IMO she didn't even at the time I saw the band know how to play with other live musicians & be one member of a band organization.

Having said all that, if someone only wants to play covers for fun, there is nothing wrong with "Play by Numbers." But if they want to develop as an individual musician & play in a band, that will be counter-productive.
 

Loud

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When I was a kid, someone told me that to be a drummer, you should be able to perform some sort of movement with your feet. This implied some natural ability. On YouTube, the message is anyone can learn. That part is useful in the sense of, you’re not there yet but keep working on it and you can be good.

Lots of people give up on music at some point. The keep-on-going positive attitude on YouTube can be helpful when facing another home practice session alone.
 

Pat A Flafla

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You've heard of or remember "Paint by Numbers." Today it is "Play by Numbers."

Most learn by tabs or watching a video teaching them to play not by note. This goes for guitar, bass, keys, too. Then go post a video on IG, FB or Tim Tok playing that cover. They miss rudiments, theory, sense of feeling entirely. If you can learn to paint the Mona Lisa this way perfectly, it does not lead to anything but further copying.

I've met or spoken with a few of the popular YouTube cover players (drums, guitar & bass) and most have had teachers oddly enough. One of the most popular YouTube drummers playing covers (many of her videos have millions of views) I met when she was playing in a original band with a CD released. She really didn't cut it. The bass player had better time. (I really wanted to suggest using a click track) She also was overplaying at times, bashing which stepped on the vocals. She's known for that on YouTube tho. A few months later she was fired from the band. IMO she didn't even at the time I saw the band know how to play with other live musicians & be one member of a band organization.

Having said all that, if someone only wants to play covers for fun, there is nothing wrong with "Play by Numbers." But if they want to develop as an individual musician & play in a band, that will be counter-productive.
Tornado: this is exactly what I was talking about. Youtube sensations who can't play worth a darn outside the fishbowl.
 

Josla

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For me it is not a question but one knows, children will start playing drums via the Internet or YouTube faster. But there is a BIG PROBLEM that I personally see in this, and that is that children cannot or almost cannot put things into perspective, and almost only see SUPER drummers, whether they are adults or children who play the drums, they are all "flawlessly" good at what they do.

Because of course they only put the successful recordings on YouTube. That will certainly regularly ensure that a novice drummer quits, through frustration not getting the hang of it. No level determination per individual is included. It's more like "oh, that guy on YouTube is really good, cool and fun, so I'm going to learn that too" RUDIMENTS are boring and boring, so they don't. There is no physical contact, if you don't like it, they look for another "teacher". So what my thoughts on this are in short: drum lessons via YouTube are for the advanced drummer, and for those who are actually taught by a person next to it.
 

Pounder

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A little hint: The videos they put on there ain't as "perfect" as they think they are. The problems are this:

As a learning drummer one has one's own individual issues they must address as they improve skills. Youtube can't see what they are.

The drummers show themselves playing typically an exercise, out of context with any music (other than just the music of playing a drum set).

There are distractions of 1) non-related videos vying for one's attention 2) drum related but not relevant to the student's needs and no one to help them filter through them 3) No interactivity, no waiting for the viewer to play and finish the exercise, etc.

One would be better served to use music and ears, as well as a few choice books and a teacher.
 

JDA

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"Ok. So with the advent of the internet everybody has drummers figured out.. except for one Elvin Jones"


............jda
 


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