Does your taste in drums reflect your taste in cars?

Monday317

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 2, 2011
Messages
107
Reaction score
72
Location
Western PA
Does your taste in drums/cymbals reflect your taste in cars, or are those tastes separate/unrelated? There's the musician stereotype, where they transport spectacular instruments in the cheapest hoopie that will get them to the bar. My drums sound great, and my cars seem underwhelming on the surface, but I think my drums and vehicles have more in common than the stereotype suggests.

For example, my driveway contains an 80s Toyota 4x4, a 15yo 320k mile Civic that's still kicking ass, and a Mk2 Supra I resurrected from the dead (at a total cost of $2k) with badly faded original paint. It think that closely reflects my percussion stable, containing stuff like Acrolite, Supraphonic, MIJ stencils, good working man's cymbals--nothing artisinal that I'd be reluctant to take to a bar gig, with a Masters Mahogany kit I got used being the outlier. I have lots of snare drums, but only 2 were over $250 and bought new (a 15" Pearl and an Oriollo). My cymbals were almost all $200 or less, good deals on quality stuff from the big two brands with some Bosphorus, Meinl Mb20, UFIP, etc. mingled in there. So just like my cars, my drums number probably 200% more than most people's, but they're inexpensive, overwhelmingly sensible and versatile, with a few quirky items that are there just because they're fun to drive. With the exception of a few of my snares, everything has cosmetic issues, and I couldn't care less, just like my cars. They're there to do a job. Just like my gear, I don't plan on selling any of my vehicles as long as I can keep them humming along.

Is there anyone here with a PDP and a Mercedes? Do you haul your DW Collector's Series to the gig in a beat up Mirage missing a fender, like the stereotype suggests?

I think kits/cars might be more like owners and dogs looking similar, or maybe the stereotype is accurate.
Hadn’t considered it before. I usually prefer old to new: my car is a beat-up 2006 Elantra I keep fixing. I’m building my drums from old ‘90s Export shells. But my cymbals are Masters-series Bosporus, all new and carefully stored.

I dunno—
 

Living Dead Drummer

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 19, 2017
Messages
115
Reaction score
143
Location
Los Angeles, CA
I’ll say that when buying a new car, I always make sure it’s something I can fit a big kit into.
One thing I’ve always wanted was a bike, but never pulled the trigger because I can’t ride with drums, lol. But I’ll say this...
Being a Yamaha drums guy, I do look at Yamaha bikes first, lol.
 

Kevinpursuit

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 2, 2016
Messages
140
Reaction score
51
Location
S Florida
I go through cars more often than drum sets, example have a Yamaha 8000 series with Paiste cymbals, bought new in 1982 still in excellent condition, yet I have a 2020 Acura TLX tech, and a Porsche Turbo!
So I guess the answer us NO!
 

Corbin L Douthitt

Well-Known Member
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Dec 21, 2018
Messages
196
Reaction score
87
Location
Texas
Does your taste in drums/cymbals reflect your taste in cars, or are those tastes separate/unrelated? There's the musician stereotype, where they transport spectacular instruments in the cheapest hoopie that will get them to the bar. My drums sound great, and my cars seem underwhelming on the surface, but I think my drums and vehicles have more in common than the stereotype suggests.

For example, my driveway contains an 80s Toyota 4x4, a 15yo 320k mile Civic that's still kicking ass, and a Mk2 Supra I resurrected from the dead (at a total cost of $2k) with badly faded original paint. It think that closely reflects my percussion stable, containing stuff like Acrolite, Supraphonic, MIJ stencils, good working man's cymbals--nothing artisinal that I'd be reluctant to take to a bar gig, with a Masters Mahogany kit I got used being the outlier. I have lots of snare drums, but only 2 were over $250 and bought new (a 15" Pearl and an Oriollo). My cymbals were almost all $200 or less, good deals on quality stuff from the big two brands with some Bosphorus, Meinl Mb20, UFIP, etc. mingled in there. So just like my cars, my drums number probably 200% more than most people's, but they're inexpensive, overwhelmingly sensible and versatile, with a few quirky items that are there just because they're fun to drive. With the exception of a few of my snares, everything has cosmetic issues, and I couldn't care less, just like my cars. They're there to do a job. Just like my gear, I don't plan on selling any of my vehicles as long as I can keep them humming along.

Is there anyone here with a PDP and a Mercedes? Do you haul your DW Collector's Series to the gig in a beat up Mirage missing a fender, like the stereotype suggests?

I think kits/cars might be more like owners and dogs looking similar, or maybe the stereotype is accurate.
Yes.... the car must have room to get the bass drum and floor tom in the back seat, and stands in the trunks..;-)
 

drums1225

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 23, 2017
Messages
257
Reaction score
425
Location
New York, USA
My cars of the past 32 years (all Honda Civics, with my current being a 2017 Civic EX-Turbo sedan) reflect a conscious approach to basic, economical transportation that has allowed me to spend money on expensive drums, instruments, and recording gear, rather than expensive cars and gas. So I guess my car reflects the opposite of my penchant for high-end gear.
 

kip

DFO Master
Joined
Aug 5, 2005
Messages
5,385
Reaction score
208
Location
Pittsburgh Pa USA
well, my fav dream cars would be a 57 Chevy Belair and a 66 Mustang
my dream drum sets are my Gretsch Drop G SSB Natural Maple kit, and my 3 ply Slingerland in BDP...
id be game for a 40s Radioking kit as well or a 50s RB Gretsch....
so...i like older classic stuff

my gigging kit is a Yamaha Stage Custom and my car is a toyota rav4
 

Old Drummer

Very well Known Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2019
Messages
790
Reaction score
704
I've thought of this and almost posted it.

Of course, if you stop to think about it, part of what's going on is just sorting people by market niches. Some people follow the latest trends in almost everything, other people reject the latest trends in almost everything, and there are a lot of categories in between. If we looked, we'd probably find correlations between drums/cymbals and purchases of cellphones, beer, clothes, and you name it. It's not only cars. As much as people like to think of themselves as individuals making uniquely individual choices, most people cluster into identifiable market niches and make predictable purchases across the board.

I'm in the niche that consistently rejects trends. You won't find me with anything currently fashionable. In fact, I haven't even owned a car for 14 years. I'm a real outlier.

When I buy, I prioritize the old and reliable, or in the alternative, the new, functional, and cheap. Accordingly, back when I owned cars, I went with either older quality, chiefly older used Mercedes and Volvo, or new, functional, and cheap, such as a Chevy Cavalier, Nissan pickup, and even a Yugo. (Yes, I owned a Yugo, and it wasn't bad for the price.) My drums/cymbals then were 60s' Ludwigs and A. Zildjians. Now they're Gretsch Catalinas with cheap but functional Chinese hardware, mostly older A. Zildjians, and a random assortment of other older used cymbals. My cellphone is a Blackberry (yes, they're available, but I had to special order it), my beer is the cheap local brand, and except for my Birkenstocks, I buy all my clothes at Walmart or thrifts stores like Goodwill and Salvation Army.

But I'm no more of an individualist than anybody else. Although I'm a member of a minority cluster and my purchases are somewhat harder to predict than are those for members of other larger clusters, the marketers have long known that my cluster exists. They even developed generic products for people like me, and they're usually right. I'm the kind of consumer who usually chooses generic over a brand name.
 

6topher

Very well Known Member
Joined
Jun 2, 2011
Messages
1,180
Reaction score
225
Location
Baltimore, MD.
Absolutely not.

I play vintage slingerland's that I keep pretty immaculate despite touring. Don't care about cars all. I drive a 2006 Dodge Grand Caravan with 190,000 miles, lol. Buy 'em cheap & drive them til they fall apart beneath me!

I play in a rockabilly based band & we have so many fans & friends who are vintage gearheads including my upright player & we play a lot of car shows too. I usually get a pass for driving a beat up minivan when I relate my love of restoring old drums as my vintage resto passion.
 

Targalx

DFO Veteran
Joined
Jan 22, 2017
Messages
1,627
Reaction score
1,389
Location
Los Angeles
I used to eye that car but never knew what it really was until after it had been discontinued. Gem of an engine from what I understand...
One of the reasons I stopped driving it was because the Taurus SHO wasn't a good drum hauler. I didn't want to tear up the interior with my bags and cases. But yes, that engine was amazing for its time.
 

michaelocalypse

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 14, 2018
Messages
262
Reaction score
118
Location
South Florida
Um... yeah, it probably does.

My main kit is a Mapex Meridian, and my daily is a Jeep JK. All the parts were made in China. Fortunately the Mapex is more reliable with a better build quality. And a little bit of EU influence with Sonor and Benz in the mix. Again, Sonor being the better influence than Benz. The only difference is the Jeep was assembled in Ohio, but I discovered recently that at least one part was put on backwards.

Secondary car/kit: 1987 F150 & PDP Z5... the drums currently work better than the truck (until I carb it) and both need a lot of cosmetic work. Cheap workhorses though. Mesh heads and plastic cymbals, for doing work.

Tertiary car/kit: 2000 Mustang & spare parts... The car was $500 with a bad fuel pump. Looks like hell, but it's all there. The kit is random shells I've acquired and been putting together with matching hardware. Just need a floor tom shell. Also looks like hell. Both will end up costing way less than they look like, and be completely functional. Projects for the heck of it.

Wildcard: Buell Blast & SPL Lil' Kicker... Both are small, cheap, and accidental purchases.
 

Kenwood

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 21, 2012
Messages
123
Reaction score
83
Location
Warwick R.I.
I work as as express courier, anything from one single letter to a full load of assorted stuff
20200202_165006.jpg

I like buying used Chrysler town and country mini vans removing all but the two front seats
and am not concerned with over all appearance as much as reliability, reasonable fuel economy,
and a generous cargo payload they always run great with a smooth ride and plenty of power
I can work a job and a drum run all at the same time.
and when they quit, at between a quarter to half a million miles
Usually from either a failed rear axle from the road salt here in the north east or a head gasket leak,
I just go right out and buy another one.
 
Last edited:


Top