DON’T BE A TOOL; TREAT YOUR TOOLS RIGHT

squidart

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Next time someone asks for opinions on using their kit for a backline I shall refer them to this thread. Same stuff, different environment.
 

Pat A Flafla

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Even my 11 year old students overtighten hardware so I don't think it has anything to do with physical strength--just lack of understanding of the effects. That said, I must admit to purposeful mega-torquing on my setup-time-saver hardware. My regular setup has a single stand base supporting ride, large crash, effect cym, 14" floor tom, and sometimes more. I have to crank the bejeezuz out of some of those wing nuts to keep things still, and some of the clamps have dented the tubes. Some might say that's an abusive situation for the hardware, and I wouldn't argue. Sure saves me setup time though.

But stands only holding what they were designed to hold? Just barely enough tension to keep them from slipping.
 

5 Style

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Yeah... it's pretty silly. I'd put breaking heads, cymbals, etc regularly in the camp... which is something that it seems that certain metal drummers like to brag about doing. It's like even if you're not breaking stuff, you're not working hard enough... never mind that yuo will always get a better tone (and a fuller one too) if you don't hit the gear so hard.
 
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Pat A Flafla

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Yeah... it's pretty silly. I'd put breaking heads, cymbals, etc regularly in the camp... which is something that it seems that certain metal drummers like to brag about doing. It's like even if you're not breaking stuff, you're not working hard enough... never mind that yu will always get a better tone (and a fuller one too) if you don't git the gear so hard.
Cymbals, sure, but there's a hard rock snare tone that is impossible to obtain without high velocity strokes and non-cranked tuning, and it's inherently damaging to sticks and heads. I love the sound of full wallop on either a med-tight Ambassador or low Emperor with thin-ish sticks, and that costs me more money than playing mezzo-forte with 5As on a more resilient head/tuning combo, but tone is tone.

Well, there is a replacement: sound replacement, but at that point the band might as well just fire the drummer and play with a track.
 

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Cymbals, sure, but there's a hard rock snare tone that is impossible to obtain without high velocity strokes and non-cranked tuning, and it's inherently damaging to sticks and heads. I love the sound of full wallop on either a med-tight Ambassador or low Emperor with thin-ish sticks, and that costs me more money than playing mezzo-forte with 5As on a more resilient head/tuning combo, but tone is tone.

Well, there is a replacement: sound replacement, but at that point the band might as well just fire the drummer and play with a track.
I'll have to take your word for it because that's the sort of sound that I'm sure that I would never go after, though I suppose that if it gets you the vibe that you're looking for it could be worth a broken head and a broken set of sticks. Those things though are meant to be replaceable... "consumables" as it were. I've never considered cymbals or other gear in that category though. I remember overhearing a couple of metal drummer types talking about how they were snapping pedals (as if it were a point of pride!)... and that to me seems excessive, horrifyingly so. I'm not at all into modern metal stuff, though I can certainly appreciate the obvious skill that I hear some drummers bring to it. The ones that I've checked out on YouTube though who seem to have the highest level of technical skill (I can't vouch for the artistry part because the stuff doesn't really appeal to me), play at surprisingly low volume levels. I don't think that you can really get max speed or dynamics if you're smashing nearly ever stroke at full force and nearly breaking everything on the kit...

I think that certain attitudes that we here in the West have unfortunately cultivated over the years mean that we're more likely to really abuse our gear because it's all seen as kind of disposable anyway... It's a kind of victim of the conspicuous consumerism that our culture supports, whereby stuff that we own we figure is destined to be thrown in a landfill and eventually replaced with something else, rather than carefully taken care of and passed down to others who might really appreciate it...
 
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Pat A Flafla

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I'll have to take your word for it because that's the sort of sound that I'm sure that I would never go after, though I suppose that if it gets you the vibe that you're looking for it could be worth a broken head and a broken set of sticks. Those thing's though are meant to be replaceable... "consumables" as it were. I've never considered cymbals or other gear in that category though. I remember overhearing a couple of metal drummer types talking about how they were snapping pedals (as if it were a point of pride!)... and that to me seems excessive, horrifyingly so. I'm not at all into modern metal stuff, though I can certainly appreciate the obvious skill that I hear some drummers bring to it. The ones that I've checked out on YouTube though who seem to have the highest level of technical skill (I can't vouch for the artistry part because the stuff doesn't really appeal to me), play at surprisingly low volume levels. I don't think that you can really get max speed or dynamics if you're smashing nearly ever stroke at full force and nearly breaking everything on the kit...

I think that certain attitudes that we here in the West have unfortunately cultivated over the years mean that we're more likely to really abuse our gear because it's all seen as kind of disposable anyway... It's a kind victim of the conspicuous consumerism that our culture supports, whereby stuff that we own we figure is destined to be thrown in a landfill and eventually replaced with something else, rather than carefully taken care of and passed down to others who might really appreciate it...
I surely agree with your indictment of the concept of disposability in western culture. I hate unnecessary waste, and I really hate paying to replace stuff I consider to be potentially permanent. For practicing, I run my headphones off of a 13yo netbook I can't bring myself to decommission (especially since it runs even better with Linux than it did with WinXP). I print on the back of bad prints, and empty unused packets of fast food salt, pepper, and red pepper flakes into shakers.

Sticks, heads, tires, firewood... meant to be used up.

But not cymbals and hardware! Notice those meatheads in your anecdote weren't bragging about the size of their savings.
 
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5 Style

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I surely agree with your indictment of the concept of disposability in western culture. I hate unnecessary waste, and I really hate paying to replace stuff I consider to be potentially permanent. For practicing, I run my headphones off of a 13yo netbook I can't bring myself to decommission (especially since it runs even better with Linux than it did with WinXP). I print on the back of bad prints, and empty unused packets of fast food salt, pepper, and red pepper flakes into shakers.

Sticks, heads, tires, firewood... meant to be used up.

But not cymbals and hardware! Notice those meatheads in your anecdote weren't bragging about the size of their savings.
Yeah, I get that... I've been buying less and less drum gear these days (though I did buy another cheap kit for rehearsal purposes recently), but in the last couple years I've gotten into audio gear a bit. I always seem to find decent gear used at great prices and like the idea that I'm getting good use out of stuff that might otherwise fill some gear hoarders closet. I don't stockpile gear myslef either as everything new thing that I buy means that I get rid of the old...

I'm using a very old Mac... though not quite as old as your Windows (or really Linnux) machine, though as much as I'd like to hold onto it, I feel that it's more and more not comparable with various things, which will mean that I'll be forced to get something newer at some point.
 


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