Drum Confessions Thread

backtodrum

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Aaaaaaack.....most folks used Ludwig mounts on their Gretsch (and Camco) kits back in the day(z).....
bt
I wouldn't of hesitated to do something like that either back in the day. All I want is my drum kit to work the way it needs to period. Back in the day I played professionally 5 to 6 nights a week and didn't have time to mess with stuff breaking or giving me trouble on a gig. Even today I will make what ever changes necessary to accomplish what I am trying to overcome or achieve with a particular gear problem. I give little thought to how or if it effects re-sale or collectability 20 years from now. Drums for me are to be played and used for their intended purpose. My mind just doesn't think in those terms and it never has. I've stated before, my dad was a brilliant machinist. He would often fabricate parts I needed out of stainless steel or aluminum that were polished like chrome and often far superior in looks and function to the cast "Pig Iron" hardware of 40 years ago. He made a new bass plate for my Ludwig bass drum tom mount that had stripped out and that I had fixed multiple times only to strip out again. My toms would slowly slide down while playing. He milled me a new one out of billet aluminum threaded with a stainless steel insert that would not strip or slip. I polished it on a buffing wheel and it looked like the original only so much better and I never had another issue with it. I had other drummer friends ask me if he would build them parts as well. I would tell them he will build anything for you for the right price.
 

drumr386

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Having played for 55 years at this point I am at best mediocre, but I would say I have good time.
I have zero concept of how to count, I can’t even tell you where 1 is. Thankfully I goof around in a cover band so I mimic. Those that can count must be warlocks.
Looking at my kit one day I noticed how the bass head hoops stand out against the finish. I can’t unsee them now, even really expensive drums look cheap because of this.
 
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OldNSlowDrummer

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I have been playing 50+ years. Never took a lesson. I signed up for lessons two times but decided I was happy the way I was and never went. I haven't improved in 25 years but oddly I'm happy that way. That's about the time I stopped playing out. Somehow I never enjoyed that. I drug my crappy drum set until it got so much hangar rash that other drummers started to pity me. Somehow I found that hilarious and made a point to use that crappy set long after it should have been in the dump. It had UFIP cymbals. I wanted Zildjian cymbals but we didn't have the money and try as I might, I could not smash those UFIPs so my Dad made me keep using them. They were embarrassing and sounded like tin.

Jazz makes me want to smash things just listening to it. I know cultured drummers are supposed to like it but I don't. I'm not cultured. I do like Japanese jazz. Can't believe I said that.

I'm in my late 50s and I play mostly alternative metal and old rock. My wife of 30+ years plays keyboard and likes that too so I don't feel too odd. I guess I mostly don't care too much. I just play. I figured when I passed 50 that I was old enough to be eccentric so I stopped caring.

Last time I played was a couple of months ago and I was coming down with covid but didn't know it. I played fairly hard for two hours and when I got up to go get supper I fell in the floor.

My first floor tom in the 70s was made from two pawn shop snare drums that my dad put together, covered in speckled shelf paper to (not really) match my white sparkle, no name, kit. We bought that set second hand from a girl. My dad was embarrassed that my set was girly and we couldn't afford to buy a better floor tom but the band I was playing with insisted we needed that sound. I loved him for that (and other things). I always like the way that old double snare floor tom sounded except for a faint buzz somewhere in the joint. I wish I still had it cause my dad worked hard on that.

I converted my acoustic drums to electric to save my families' ears. I have 8 toms. Not that I need 8 toms but I no longer drag my set to play out and I can finally afford them. Come to think of it, yes I need 8 toms. I may need another next week. No I don't care.

I take pride in getting electric cymbals whose size and shape represent the sound I assign. Small splashes, medium sized crashes, big rides, etc. After 30+ years of playing acoustic symbols, I could not teach my brain that electric drums and cymbals don't have to look like they sound.

I played with a single bass pedal for 35 years. My wife bought me a double pedal but I'll never be able to use it. One foot bass is so engrained at this point that I'll go to the grave never being able to play the cool stuff I hear in my favorite music. That REALLY REALLY bothers me way more than it should. Getting old sucks (but the alternative is worse).

After I converted my acoustics to electric I kept my zildjians in two cymbal safes for nearly ten years "just in case I decide to go back". It had nothing to do with that. I knew I never planned to go back. It took so long to afford those cymbals, one at a time, that I couldn't bare to part with then. I'd get em out of the case every now and then just to look at em.

I still buy zildjian TShirts. The other day, a young guy at the grocery store said "Zidjians! Cool!" Then he look up at my face , looked kind of strange and said "you still play?" I said "Hell Yeah I still play!"

OK That's enough confessions for anybody.
 
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studrum

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Love it!

Nevermind. I painted my first kit— a 1960s red onyx Sonor— with black house paint using a paint brush. I didn’t know drum heads were removable so I masking taped all the lugs, tension rods, hoops, and heads. Think I’m still paying off the masking tape bill…and my therapist.
So it was you, YOU - and your kind! - who used this demonic technique to paint black over the splendid blue lacquer SlingerLeedys I found in ravaged condition in a garage years later. Of course, a 'lil bit of that black paint got under the masked heads and lugs..

Ah, the sins of youth!
 

JimmySticks

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I admit that I get a little sad and misty eyed when DFO tells me, "you have no new alerts":sad11:
 

Tufty

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I lost a bag of cymbals after a gig with a K custom brilliant ride (late 80s), two K dark crashes, and K hats...

It made me stop playing for awhile.
I did the same once (no K’s in the bag though) and I was so depressed I went and made a down payment on a set of recording customs. The next week my buddy calls up and says “I found your cymbals “ they were still in the trunk of that cab. The driver apparently said “I thought something sounded funny back there”
Have since sold most of those cymbals but still have the recording customs. Was playing them this morning. Best depression purchase I ever made
 

Terryt

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It was 2005, the apex of my frustration being in bands. I started a new career (building maintenance) which I'm still doing today. I never said to myself, "I'm quitting the drums", but I was sure sick of being in bands and all the drama that goes with it. Out of this anger, I threw my Acrolite in the dumpster. My first drum, the one my parents gave me, the one I learned rudiments on, played in elementary school through my 30's. Never thought about selling it, giving it away, nothing...straight in the trash. I have forgiven myself and at least I have pictures. :)
Should the last sentence read - “I have *never* forgiven myself …. ?
 

Cauldronics

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I did the same once (no K’s in the bag though) and I was so depressed I went and made a down payment on a set of recording customs. The next week my buddy calls up and says “I found your cymbals “ they were still in the trunk of that cab. The driver apparently said “I thought something sounded funny back there”
Have since sold most of those cymbals but still have the recording customs. Was playing them this morning. Best depression purchase I ever made
Glad you made something good out of it and that you found your cymbals!

At the time, I didn’t have enough money to replace the cymbals for awhile so I scrapped together some cheap ones until I could get something better.
 

mebeatee

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I wouldn't of hesitated to do something like that either back in the day. All I want is my drum kit to work the way it needs to period. Back in the day I played professionally 5 to 6 nights a week and didn't have time to mess with stuff breaking or giving me trouble on a gig. Even today I will make what ever changes necessary to accomplish what I am trying to overcome or achieve with a particular gear problem. I give little thought to how or if it effects re-sale or collectability 20 years from now. Drums for me are to be played and used for their intended purpose. My mind just doesn't think in those terms and it never has. I've stated before, my dad was a brilliant machinist. He would often fabricate parts I needed out of stainless steel or aluminum that were polished like chrome and often far superior in looks and function to the cast "Pig Iron" hardware of 40 years ago. He made a new bass plate for my Ludwig bass drum tom mount that had stripped out and that I had fixed multiple times only to strip out again. My toms would slowly slide down while playing. He milled me a new one out of billet aluminum threaded with a stainless steel insert that would not strip or slip. I polished it on a buffing wheel and it looked like the original only so much better and I never had another issue with it. I had other drummer friends ask me if he would build them parts as well. I would tell them he will build anything for you for the right price.
Yes, yes, yes, and yes!!!!
My gear has to work....not to sit on a shelf and look pretty for pix, or only played in the basement. My livelihood depends upon my "tools", and always has.
There are some folks who would cringe at what I've done to some of my gear.....a '63 Camco snare, '65 Sonor kit, mid '70's Gretsch orphan kit, etc. Some of these drums have travelled with me around North America and the Baltics/Russia for decades and haven't let me down. If I would have left them "stock" they would have broken....hard touring is hard on instruments.....
It also helps that the folks at the old Drums Only, and the Rufus Drum Shop in Vancouver gave lots of advice and encouragement....but I did the actual drilling etc., they supplied the parts.

Now having said that....my "confession" is one of my fav snare drums, and the one that (most often) travels on airplanes is a cheapo "Dynamic" brand 12x4 snare. I put a coated pinstripe head on the batter side. Now I don't like pinheads at all, but on this pingy little drum that head makes it sound like a snare drum. Of course the hardware is up to snuff.... Sometimes this serves as a back up snare as I've been provided with some pretty spiffy kits overseas, including snare and cymbals even though I'm travelling with the "breakables".....which I've always found amusing as anything is breakable...;)
bt
 

Michael M.

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This is anonymous, right? haha

Ok, stand back...

1. I buy drum instruction books and it feels amazing – like I'm one step closer to being a better player with every purchase. However, I rarely get past page one and now there's a 100lbs stack of them lying neglected beside my kit. But if another cool looking book comes out...I'M GETTING IT!
1b. Same with instructional videos and subscriptions - I love watching them, but don't apply a dang thing...
2. I still use a baby gate to secure the perimeter of my drums even though my kids can now hurdle over it.
3. My pandemic depression management technique was to allow for EPIC GAS to set in...to the tune of about 50 snare drums that are now stuffed into every available corner of the house.
4. I love jazz and have an intense collection of jazz records on vinyl. But I can't play the jazz ride pattern with any kind of comping at all...it would take me a day to learn the basics...but to this day...haven't got around to it.
5. I can't play a shuffle...I hate playing shuffles (even though they comprise practically 50% of all grooves ever). When I went to a Drum Camp hosted by Dave Weckl (and other big name drummers), he had each of us come up and play across from him. He'd lay down a tom groove and we had to play along. Some guys got to play straight-ahead 8th note grooves. He gave me a shuffle...and it was so bad he stopped playing but told me to keep going. He just stared cockeyed at my heinous lumbering shuffle attempt for another minute trying to figure out how to help me - longest minute of my life – and then told me to stop...just stop. And I had to go sit down again in front of 30 other drummers. There was an eleven year old kid who got up after me and nailed a solid shuffle. Weckl looked back at me (then in my late 30's) with an expression that said, "Man, that's gotta be embarrassing for you." ...and to this day, I still haven't bothered to play a shuffle. NOTE: Weckl was not mean about it, just factual - he gave me a look that told me I had some work to do to catch up with everyone else. After that camp, I signed up for his online classes. He's an excellent teacher and in a day he literally fixed my hand technique, foot technique, posture and kit set-up issues. So yeah, he's awesome. Me? Not so much.
6. I LOVE the sound of distorted drums - in fact, i created a whole youtube channel devoted to exploring the sounds of guitar pedals on acoustic drums (Drums FX Pedals) where I absolutely crush my beautiful drum and cymbal tones with walls of fuzz, harsh distortion, and screechy madness. It's so abusive to the musical tones of the instruments that they are barely recognizable anymore – I may as well be hitting the inside of an empty dumpster with a crowbar. But I love it and will do it again without remorse.

I could go on...
I f you practice the first 3 pages of each of those books you will increase your technique markedly. It's not financially efficient though. You should keep the 3 best books, and sell the rest. Then practice with those books until you have crushed it. I don't understand all the snare drums. Do you Need them for gigs? When I was gigging I played 3 genres of music. At one point I had 6 snares, and pared that down to 3 , not counting the 1950's Slingerland 8" deep beauty that stays at home. Yeah , I get it about the COVID depression. I have depression anyway, and being locked down doesn't help At All. But you got to get it under control, or you could ruin yourself financially, or you could get into a really dark place. When that happens people start checking out of your life. Believe me I've been there. Just buckle down,, and hit those books. Get pissed off at the technique you are working on, and don't let it beat you. Good luck, and check out some online tutorial videos. I've been working on paradiddle speed using a online video. I didn't know paradiddles could be played that fast, but after a week my speed is much improved. Try the online stuff, it's amazing what's out there. Give it Hell !
 

CherryClassic

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1. I flunked out of 5th grade trumpet school. I just didn't "get it." Snare drum was the only thing the band leader and my folks would let me near at that point.
3 years later I took a music tonality exam with all the orchestra members.....and scored 9 out of 100.....the lowest by a mile in the group. My ah-ha moment. Drums were always meant to be....but no Timpani.....LOL.

2. I begged my parents for drum lessons in 1968. They gave in. Took them for 6 months at $5 per lesson.......rarely ever practicing until 1-2 hrs before Friday's lesson. I regret that. What a waste. I could have been a "pretender."
LOL I can not tune a guitar and don't know if a tuner would help.

STORY: When I was in High School band, playing Timpani, my band director ask me, "What note are you trying to play?" Looking at the music, I replied, it's on the second line from the bottom....I thought he was going to have a cow right there in the band hall and the whole band was laughing. Reality was my friend that played bass trombone was absent that day and I took my tone relationship from his playing.

Luckily, I own a Tune Bot now. LOL

sherm
 

rhythmace

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I lost interest in music when the arena rock thing got big. I remember a guy telling me how good Sonor drums were and I thought they were a cheap Japanese brand. Therefore there is a hole in my music history. I can't do the triplets around the drums that sound like a flat tire at high speed. I feel inadequate there. Some say it's passe anyway. I quit visiting this forum twice because of mods. One was 9 lb tongue. LOL! I am the best I ever heard at spontaneous jamming. I can play what I think up instantly and pick up on others stuff. I really wish I had learned that quick double bass drum thing like needed on "Good Times Bad Times." I most admire drums stuff like you hear on commercials. It's like a composer. I hate the DW drums that sound like wet cardboard. The ones that have shells made to a "note." I was late to fully appreciate BongoCongo. The monkey thing bugged me at first. I am an all Rogers guy, but would love a Sonor Delite set. I really don't like any cymbals but Zildjian. Back in the day though, 95% of them were crap. I hate the friggin "WAAA" cymbal thing. It's just noise in music. Playing rhythm guitar in a band really made me appreciate song structure more. I learned that the rhythm guitar player is often better at setting the tempo. My playing is stuck in the 60s, but I can rock. I love Weckl. I like Don Henly. I loved Buddy, Morello, Hanna, Colomby, Ringo and all the players one should love. I liked Charlie. The SONG is where it's at. Too much is made of players. I like a good drum solo, but too many are variations on the same damn rhythm. Old K played one here that was not great but was really enjoyable because of the variety. It was not monotonous. He threw in a cowbell part that was really fresh. I saw Tutt many times with Neil. I always wanted him to break into the "Elvis Has Left The Building" thing. I went out with Ronnie's cousin some. Big deal, lol. I am one of the few that understand that a drum does not produce a note. Just a pitch. Even a tympani produces a quasi-note. That makes me superior. Losing Longroll and Tommy Wells really were blows to this forum.
P.S. My fantasy is to play in a band with women that dress and talk dirty.
 
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bpaluzzi

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I am one of the few that understand that a drum does not produce a note. Just a pitch. Even a tympani produces a quasi-note. That makes me superior.
Single-headed kettle drums such as timpani produce a complete harmonic series and a well-defined pitch, the same as tabla.

Double-headed cylindrical drums do not.
 

JazzDrumGuy

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My first drum set was a CB700 my mom bought for me at a Christian music store. Imagine the look on her face when she caught me playing Shout at the Devil in the garage! Ah the early 80's....

Now I'm the Jazz drum guy, but I can't play jazz for crap. As my good buddy and kick butt jazz player says, I'm the guy that plays the Hats on one and three and sometimes on two and four. I wake up every morning telling myself that today is the day my left hand will perform like my right hand, yet I still can't do a rudiment to save my behind!

Like most things in life, I'm a great faker!
In high school, our golf team motto was "I'd rather look good and play bad then look bad and play Bad!" It's gotten me quite far in life.
At least I don't lie and call myself the Jazz drummer guy. I just have a pile of nice vintage jazz drums at the house that barely get used. In fact, my suitcase kit has seen more action than all of my round badge combined! But having a lot of gear makes up for my technical inability and shortcomings!

I'd much rather play rock and roll than jazz. It's a lot easier and I don't have to think about it. Frankly, I'd rather be playing bass. I think it's the easiest instrument by far. There's just no glory in it! It's all about guitars and drums to get the ladies, which is why I (and pretty much any teen boy) started playing of course! No complaints there.
Just noise complaints by the neighbors.

I think I could go on but my hour is up.....
 


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