Drum Confessions Thread

dale w miller

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I LIKE ROTO TOMS! :happy7:
I wish I had an entire kit of them. The first studio I recorded in’s house kit was all roto toms.

I hate DW drums because they are extremely overpriced.
As an owner of a very successful high quality business of 19 years and an attempted one that failed, I hate the terms “overpriced” and “ripoff”. I find it insulting and ignorant.

If you don’t find it worth it to you and rather get something else than o be it, buy something else. But you don’t know what their expenses are and how much they have to charge to stay in business or make it worth simply doing so.

If an extreme majority of people felt the way you do, they simply wouldn’t be in business mostly because people don’t find they like them enough to pay that cost or quite frankly, they couldn’t afford them.

I’ve had people bad mouth my failed company online calling it a ripoff when I was selling my product for my cost just to get them out there.

For my successful business, I had a woman start yelling at me over the phone because she was originally excited and ready to signup, but when told the price she started freaking out on me. In her case, she couldn’t afford it, believed it was my fault she couldn’t, and didn’t want to admit to herself it was her fault.

The sin of Pride- the only reason my band mates sound good is because of me. It's never the other way around!
If you’re serious, it’s time to run from that band faster than if you found a bear in your kitchen.

I think Lars Ulrich is a good drummer.

Phew.
He has his moments or at least had them. Besides that, he and his band are super cool to share everything that they do equally with their newest bassist as shown in their Monster documentary. There are not many successful bands that are willing to do that. Their hearts are in the right place.

I absolutely HATE the trend of using the trashiest, earthy , unlathed cymbals that's recently been popular. They sound like those old budget brass pieces of crap that they used to sell. When I hear those awful things, I tune right out....
I call them trash can lids.
They are the current replacement for those who for whatever reason don’t want to admit to themselves that they want to have a China on their kit.

2. Absolute love, admire and respect Phil Collins as a drummer and musician. But his concert tom sounds on those old Gretsch kits just sounded like roto-toms. Not a fan of that sound. The duets he played on them though are still amazing.
It’s a sound that is exclusively his own and there are not many drummers who can say that.
 

SpinaDude

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[/QUOTE]
It’s a sound that is exclusively his own and there are not many drummers who can say that.
[/QUOTE]
Very true. A signature sound. Not trying to diminish it. Obviously only my opinion.
 

rhythmace

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You should probably take your own advice ;)




No, it doesn't. It refers to the difference in frequency between the notes. The major 3rd is 1/4 of the fundamental pitch higher. If the fundamental pitch is 100Hz, the major 3rd is (100*0.25) higher, or 125Hz. Another way to write this (the more common way) is as the ratio between the frequencies: 5 to 4, or 5:4.

Similarly, the perfect 5th is 1/2 of the fundamental pitch higher: 100Hz*0.5 = 150Hz.
A ratio of 3:2



I'm not talking about anything involving guitars.



No it's not. The 4th fret harmonic is 2 octaves and a major third above the open string.

The 5th fret is half way to the 12th fret (3/4 string length), and it has the harmonic 2 octaves above the open string.




No, I'm not. This is basic music theory.



No, it's not. The fret is 1/3 of the way up the string, but the vibrating part of the string is 2/3 the length of the string. Which gives a frequency ratio of 3:2, like I said.



No, it's not. Even using the reverse naming convention you used on the 7th fret (calling a 2/3 length string "1/3 length"), the major 3rd is not 5/6th the length of the open string. It's 64/81 the length of the open string.


Not a definite pitch they can't. And which side of the argument are you on here?



The pitches are treating the shells as idiophones, not membranaphones. Idiophones can easily be tuned to a pitch (see marimba / xylophones). The DW pitch matching is still snake oil, but it's completely irrelevant to this discussion.
You got away from the original assertion that a drum or even a t
You should probably take your own advice ;)




No, it doesn't. It refers to the difference in frequency between the notes. The major 3rd is 1/4 of the fundamental pitch higher. If the fundamental pitch is 100Hz, the major 3rd is (100*0.25) higher, or 125Hz. Another way to write this (the more common way) is as the ratio between the frequencies: 5 to 4, or 5:4.

Similarly, the perfect 5th is 1/2 of the fundamental pitch higher: 100Hz*0.5 = 150Hz.
A ratio of 3:2



I'm not talking about anything involving guitars.



No it's not. The 4th fret harmonic is 2 octaves and a major third above the open string.

The 5th fret is half way to the 12th fret (3/4 string length), and it has the harmonic 2 octaves above the open string.




No, I'm not. This is basic music theory.



No, it's not. The fret is 1/3 of the way up the string, but the vibrating part of the string is 2/3 the length of the string. Which gives a frequency ratio of 3:2, like I said.



No, it's not. Even using the reverse naming convention you used on the 7th fret (calling a 2/3 length string "1/3 length"), the major 3rd is not 5/6th the length of the open string. It's 64/81 the length of the open string.


Not a definite pitch they can't. And which side of the argument are you on here?



The pitches are treating the shells as idiophones, not membranaphones. Idiophones can easily be tuned to a pitch (see marimba / xylophones). The DW pitch matching is still snake oil, but it's completely irrelevant to this discussion.

This thread is about a drum or even tympani not making a musical note. I said the harmonic over the fourth fret is AN octave. Not THE octave, if you re-read it. It's an E on the 1st and 6th strings. I am on the subject of what creates a note via harmonic frequencies that are an intergral multiple of a fundamental. actually the major 3rd is the harmonic at 1/5, 2/5, 3/5, 4/5 and descending 6/5 etc. Are you really saying that a xylophone does not produce a note? Drums can be tuned to a pitch. It's done in the studio all the time. You seen to think that a tympani produces a note and a marimba does not? Bet you don't know where the minor third or the perfect 4th comes from? Bet you look that up before responding.
 

JimmySticks

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You got away from the original assertion that a drum or even a t



This thread is about a drum or even tympani not making a musical note. I said the harmonic over the fourth fret is AN octave. Not THE octave, if you re-read it. It's an E on the 1st and 6th strings. I am on the subject of what creates a note via harmonic frequencies that are an intergral multiple of a fundamental. actually the major 3rd is the harmonic at 1/5, 2/5, 3/5, 4/5 and descending 6/5 etc. Are you really saying that a xylophone does not produce a note? Drums can be tuned to a pitch. It's done in the studio all the time. You seen to think that a tympani produces a note and a marimba does not? Bet you don't know where the minor third or the perfect 4th comes from? Bet you look that up before responding.
Is there a confession somewhere in this music theory spat? Or are we just showing off at this point? :scratch:
 

rhythmace

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Is there a confession somewhere in this music theory spat? Or are we just showing off at this point? :scratch:
I am responding to posts that are challenging (or seem to be) facts about musical notes. The definition is not my opinion. I understand the scientific reason that a drum does not produce a note that, BTW, I got from another member. I take pride in being a drummer that understands this. Do you ever find your drums out of tune with musical instruments? We can tune them to intervals with other drums and to a pitch, but not a note. Ace
 

stefanwegner

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What’s yr YouTube channel? I wanna hear that.
Just search "Drums FX Pedals" on YouTube. You'll hear sloppy drumming and terrible demos of "guitar" pedals, but I'm still the only one putting out consistent videos of effects pedals on acoustic drums.
Hey wait, maybe there's a reason no one else does it.
Hmmm....
 

cruddola

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I got a beat-down worthy of a death-sentence by mistaken identity while loading up my kit after a gig. Guy he was to kill was playing at a different venue. I'm a Beaner, the other drummer was Asian. I managed to put his eye out with a foot-long prybar. My roadie sister smashed him with her Beetle even when he was down for the count. Backed up and hit him again. I got a hospital diet for three days, he got four months in the hospital and 31 years without parole. Louisiana law doesn't play around.
 

JimmySticks

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I got a beat-down worthy of a death-sentence by mistaken identity while loading up my kit after a gig. Guy he was to kill was playing at a different venue. I'm a Beaner, the other drummer was Asian. I managed to put his eye out with a foot-long prybar. My roadie sister smashed him with her Beetle even when he was down for the count. Backed up and hit him again. I got a hospital diet for three days, he got four months in the hospital and 31 years without parole. Louisiana law doesn't play around.
Man, you have some epic stories! You're no:angel13:!!!:shock:
 

cruddola

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Man, you have some epic stories! You're no:angel13:!!!:shock:
Not really, tons of folks have stories, they just don't share them. Comes from playing too many biker parties when I was young. Three of my Vet uncles were hardcore bikers after WW2 and Korea. One was a made guy. They're long gone. Our band, Wheel, was the 'official' suppliers of music for all their parties. Some of them were great musicians themselves. Their biggest parties were usually held when one of their own got released from prison or beat the legal system. It was easy money. 200 bucks a gig back in the early 70s was great. I have no problem sharing what 66 years of life has given me. I should've died that night. That prybar kept the van's sliding door from sagging off the top rail when open. I was 17 then, my sister was 16. Dude was in his 30s. Danced on me good. My sister only had to hit him once. She rolled right over him. Backs up rolling over him again. Second time she went right over the dude a third time dragging him two blocks and just kept going. YIKES! Glad she was there. My uncles told the cops my assailant was hit by lightning. Really, I'm just a drop in the ocean.
 
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cruddola

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I confess that I barely glossed over the timpani discussion.
I speak English, Northern Irish English, Mexican Spanish, Gutter Spanish, Chilango Spanish, Corrupt Cantonese, Dari, Pashto, Palestinian Arabic, Phoney Farsi and have no idea what some of these guys are talking about.
 

rhythmace

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I speak English, Northern Irish English, Mexican Spanish, Gutter Spanish, Chilango Spanish, Corrupt Cantonese, Dari, Pashto, Palestinian Arabic, Phoney Farsi and have no idea what some of these guys are talking about.
Many of us drummers (probably most) tune the toms to intervals. Most studio drummers (it appears) tune the toms to a pitch. Neil Peart for example. It seems many engineers want that. Some think that a pitch is the same as a musical note. It is not. Even a tympani doesn't not make a note per the definition proper of a musical note. So the tangent
topic is about drums on a drum forum. What sounds are notes and which are not. Ace
 

cruddola

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Many of us drummers (probably most) tune the toms to intervals. Most studio drummers (it appears) tune the toms to a pitch. Neil Peart for example. It seems many engineers want that. Some think that a pitch is the same as a musical note. It is not. Even a tympani doesn't not make a note per the definition proper of a musical note. So the tangent
topic is about drums on a drum forum. What sounds are notes and which are not. Ace
I've never thought a drum as note, only pitch myself. I've been asked to raise a pitch or lower a pitch on recording sessions. Never a note.
 

JDA

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4 years with Dean Anderson (second to Vic Firth) (40 years ago in Boston) Tympani is a pitched percussion along with a few other percussion instruments.
You do tune Sharp because of due to- the distance back of stage to front. But you do tune. (intervals, pitch pipe, sol'fege)
I had a 5 drum solo tympani Senior recital piece- have the score around here somewhere- don't make me dig it up.

or prove it (listen) or search Tympani Concerto on YT if you've time (lots of time)

sheet music:

aw ya made me.
She's a Pro. Look at her tuning with her foot. wow
she's in control buddy. muffling with her hand whew.
It's a beautiful piece too a beautiful piece.
She has to set up notes before they happen.
Same with him
 
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hsosdrum

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4 years with Dean Anderson (second to Vic Firth) (40 years ago in Boston) Tympani is a pitched percussion along with a few other percussion instruments.
You do tune Sharp because of due to- the distance back of stage to front. But you do tune. (intervals, pitch pipe, sol'fege)
I had a 5 drum solo tympani Senior recital piece- have the score around here somewhere- don't make me dig it up.

or prove it (listen) or search Tympani Concerto on YT if you've time (lots of time)
...She's a Pro. Look at her tuning with her foot. wow
she's in control buddy. muffling with her hand whew.
It's a beautiful piece too a beautiful piece.
She has to set up notes before they happen.
Not only that, when she retunes she has to keep her eye on the tuning gauges while she's playing a different drum!

My girlfriend in high school was a harp player and I'll never forget how her feet danced around on the harp's pedals as she played. A concert harp has 7 strings per octave, with a 3-position pedal for each note (i.e. a pedal for all the A's, a pedal for all the B's, etc.): to play a C# the harpist steps down on the C pedal, raising all the C's to C#; to play a B-flat the harpist raises the B pedal, flatting all the B's to B-flat. Her feet were constantly moving those pedals from the first to the last note of the composition. It sure put my (at the time) meager bass-drum-pedal work into perspective.
 


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