DRUM Magazine Reveals Acoustic-Only Drummers are Piloting a Horse-and-Buggy in the Jet Age

Vistalite Black

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Face it, the traditional drum set is way behind the capabilities of a hybrid — which is why most pros (under 60) have gone hybrid. If we resist change, will acoustic players become extinct?


DRUM excerpt: ... the whole idea of a hybrid kit is to combine the best aspects of both worlds to create something new—something that wouldn’t be possible on an entirely acoustic or electronic kit. Just like sample pads add the option of loops, synth sounds, snippets of other recordings, and otherwise unimaginable effects to a kit, the subtle nuances of the hi-hat, gentle ghost notes of the snare drum, and the varying overtones of the ride cymbal add unpredictable, organic sounds to the music.

On the flip side, using samples to enhance and accompany the foundation of an acoustic kit can take the music to places you never dreamed it would go.

Article:Why You Need a Hybrid Acoustic-Electronic Drum Kit

You may think, Hybrid drum set?Pshaw, nothing beats the real thing. Or maybe your first thought is, Too many cables and electronics. I already have enough to set up at every gig. But no matter how rational the arguments you have against playing a hybrid acoustic-electronic drum set, we’re going to challenge them today, and we’ll do it without diminishing the integrity of the acoustic kit. Think of hybridization as an electronic makeover more than a remodel—no sledgehammer required.

(Skipping overlong explanation of how pretty much all jazz piano players eventually embraced electronic keyboards).

Cover Bands & Tribute Acts

If you’re in a cover band and want to take your band to the next level, adding triggers and pads gives you the option to reproduce some of the exact tones heard on the record. Imagine being on the gig and toggling between custom snare samples that match the sounds of the original recordings. You might not get the same nuanced response from the triggers that you typically get from their acoustic counterpart, but the audience won’t care about that when they’re twerking with their boss at the corporate Christmas party.

Playing in a cover band or tribute act is an ideal setting for using electronics in your rig, especially if the band is going for the “if you close your eyes it sounds like the original group” vibe. Of course it all depends on the material you’re covering, but using a hybrid setup can easily enhance the authenticity of replicating many popular drum tracks, be it gated snare tones from an old Prince jam, the iconic “click drum” tones of Lars Ulrich, or the latest trap-style sounds from a Drake song.

There’s much more... this is the Apocalypse Now Director’s Cut of articles that delve into too many lengthy tangents.

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drumfx

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Face it, the traditional drum set is way behind the capabilities of a hybrid — which is why most pros (under 60) have gone hybrid. If we resist change, will acoustic players become extinct?


DRUM excerpt: ... the whole idea of a hybrid kit is to combine the best aspects of both worlds to create something new—something that wouldn’t be possible on an entirely acoustic or electronic kit. Just like sample pads add the option of loops, synth sounds, snippets of other recordings, and otherwise unimaginable effects to a kit, the subtle nuances of the hi-hat, gentle ghost notes of the snare drum, and the varying overtones of the ride cymbal add unpredictable, organic sounds to the music.

On the flip side, using samples to enhance and accompany the foundation of an acoustic kit can take the music to places you never dreamed it would go.

Article:Why You Need a Hybrid Acoustic-Electronic Drum Kit

You may think, Hybrid drum set?Pshaw, nothing beats the real thing. Or maybe your first thought is, Too many cables and electronics. I already have enough to set up at every gig. But no matter how rational the arguments you have against playing a hybrid acoustic-electronic drum set, we’re going to challenge them today, and we’ll do it without diminishing the integrity of the acoustic kit. Think of hybridization as an electronic makeover more than a remodel—no sledgehammer required.

(Skipping overlong explanation of how pretty much all jazz piano players eventually embraced electronic keyboards).

Cover Bands & Tribute Acts

If you’re in a cover band and want to take your band to the next level, adding triggers and pads gives you the option to reproduce some of the exact tones heard on the record. Imagine being on the gig and toggling between custom snare samples that match the sounds of the original recordings. You might not get the same nuanced response from the triggers that you typically get from their acoustic counterpart, but the audience won’t care about that when they’re twerking with their boss at the corporate Christmas party.

Playing in a cover band or tribute act is an ideal setting for using electronics in your rig, especially if the band is going for the “if you close your eyes it sounds like the original group” vibe. Of course it all depends on the material you’re covering, but using a hybrid setup can easily enhance the authenticity of replicating many popular drum tracks, be it gated snare tones from an old Prince jam, the iconic “click drum” tones of Lars Ulrich, or the latest trap-style sounds from a Drake song.

There’s much more... this is the Apocalypse Now Director’s Cut of articles that delve into too many lengthy tangents.

Yah but in the late 70's they said that the drummer as a musician and that drumkits would be extinct because the electronic stuff was getting really sophisticated. Now we face a different challenge but the fact is that i know lots of studio engineers that will take a good sounding acoustic kit over any hi-end electronics. As for live situations, if i walk into a venue and see a Rolland on the stage, i have to admit that i am disapointed every time.
 

jchertudi86

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"Imagine being on the gig and toggling between custom snare samples that match the sounds of the original recordings. You might not get the same nuanced response from the triggers that you typically get from their acoustic counterpart, but the audience won’t care about that when they’re twerking with their boss at the corporate Christmas party."

They can't notice nuance in playing, but they're totally aware if you have the exact tone as the snare on a record? Give me a break. If your bass drum goes thump and your snare goes whack, you're good.
 

thin shell

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Said the magazine whose advertisers would like to sell more hybrid gear...
Exactly.

To me I think Neil Peart had the best hybrid kit approach. Pads and triggers placed around his acoustic kit to allow him to trigger keyboard parts or sounds he needed to keep the band as a three piece or to produce sounds needed to reproduce sounds used on the record. He didn't use any triggers on his acoustic drums and even though I didn't care for the way he tuned them later on, at least you were hearing real drums. His back kit allowed him to use all sorts of percussion samples of percussion instruments that don't lend themselves to being setup in an actual drum kit.
 

Polska

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One of my favs Pat Mastelotto has played a hybrid for decades. I love how he uses everything, and it has enormous creative potential, but unless I was going pro full-time, it's far too cost prohibitive for mine or I imagine most people's situation. Short of maybe adding a Korg Wave drum, I cover things as a weekend warrior with the numerous acoustic toys I have.
 

Vistalite Black

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One thing I have learned over and over throughout the years: people like to see a live drummer playing a real drum kit.
One thing I have learned over and over throughout the years: people like to see a live drummer playing a real drum kit.
It’s a real hybrid kit.
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Tmcfour

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I have a sample pad that I use, but it's for things I can't do on drums. With the exception of one noise, everything else are samples. Movie clips, backing vocal samples of my lead singer so she is essentially backing herself, radar pings, bubbles, screams, wolf howls. It's an audio circus and is more like playing another instrument.

But, the beats I do are all acoustic drums. No need to use a sampled drum sounds for me.
 

thin shell

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I just looked at the article on their page rather than the excerpts posted here and noticed that every paragraph or two had either an ad or review for electronics or hybrid kits and a couple of articles about drummers who use hybrid kits.

Although I think it is a legitimate topic to write an article about, It's hard not to put two and two together if you are the least bit cynical. Unfortunately anything you read in ad supported magazines has to be taken with a big ole grain of salt.
 

"poppies"

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One issue I've rarely seen discussed: a high quality acoustic instrument sounds rich and full in person by default, but even high quality samples are completely dependent on the amps and speakers that reproduce them.

I would argue that the heavy and expensive amp and speaker requirements to match the presence and tone quality of an acoustic instrument in even a small venue tend to be under appreciated by folks shopping for electronic instruments.
 

thin shell

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One issue I've rarely seen discussed: a high quality acoustic instrument sounds rich and full in person by default, but even high quality samples are completely dependent on the amps and speakers that reproduce them.

I would argue that the heavy and expensive amp and speaker requirements to match the presence and tone quality of an acoustic instrument in even a small venue tend to be under appreciated by folks shopping for electronic instruments.
It would also have different requirements depending on whether you are miking the acoustic drums or not. If you have a big enough PA with the available channels and are miking then you can run everything through the PA but if you don't then you would need amps next to the drum kit so the sampled sounds sound like they are coming from the drum kit. Hybrid definitely adds a lot of complexity and extra equipment requirements above and beyond the electroncs themselves.
 

moodman

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Drummers will play what their gig requires, acoustic, e-kit and hybrid are just options used when and where appropriate. It is nothing new, I played Simmons SDS1 's with mic'd drums in the mid 80's.
 


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