DRUM Magazine Reveals Acoustic-Only Drummers are Piloting a Horse-and-Buggy in the Jet Age

michaelocalypse

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In my most recent band, I offered to get a multi-zone pad to augment the kit and mimic various percussion gear that would've added to the songs. Two guys said not to bother because everything currently sounded perfectly fine, and we could rearrange future songs and adapt them to the gear we currently had (which we had already done on a few songs). The third guy wanted me to just play a cajon and a couple cymbals with brushes to make me as quiet as possible, without the ability to turn up.

To echo some other comments:
-people want to see an acoustic drum set being played
-people don't hear the nuances in tones from song to song
 

bertdrums

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I am going to disagree on the acoustic being horse and buggy,
to understand any instrument you have to know the basics and why , where your coming from. I have been lucky enough to play on , owned the better sets and electronic. Both have a place and use in the world of drumming... it to us to educate and inform those that follow us on their uses
 

drummer5359

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I'll start by saying that I'm a sixty year old boomer who has never been impressed by electronic kits.

But...

I can see the appeal of a hybrid. I'm particularly impressed with the Yamaha EAD10. I can see myself picking one up and trying it out. There is enough to it that it could be usable without getting too involved or too weird.
 

troutstudio

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I started a studio in the 80's and played just about every type of electronic drum made. I took three small pieces of ply with pickups and a sampler to jingle sessions. All this so the sequence could run later without me and sounds be subbed out, tempos and arrangements changed etc. I carried around hard drives. I listen to these songs now - many of which I have re-recorded or had covered since; and my one regret is that I didn't play acoustic drums on all of it. Now I spend my time coaxing the best I can from my instrument. And not sounding like anyone else. I tried the EAD10 - more as a replacement for my live microphones - and it failed on the top end. Plus it's more stuff to carry. If I went on tour as a hired hand and they wanted it I'd play with triggers - I did that in the 80's too. None of this is new. It's a way to sell electronics to drummers. I saw the top Roland clinician about 6 months ago by accident and I thought they sounded strange. There is no substitute for acoustic drums, that is presuming you need acoustic drums. The hybrid idea is fine but anything that means less Stick Control and more trips to the electronics store, more time setting up, more sound mixing from behind the kit - to copy Lars snare sound - is a bad nightmare to me.
 
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Frank Godiva

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Here is yet another wise voice from the past speaking the same truth

image.jpeg
 

John DeChristopher

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Does anyone else see the irony in DRUM! Magazine making this claim two years ago, and now the magazine is defunct? It struck me as kinda funny. And I say this with only love and respect for my friends at DRUM! Magazine...

I worked for Simmons from 1985-1986, at the time when Dave Simmons predicted the end of acoustic drums within a few years... And I owned an SDSV and later an SDS7. I love everything about acoustic drums and can't imagine playing electronic drums again. It's like drinking warm beer through a straw...
 

musiqman

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Does anyone else see the irony in DRUM! Magazine making this claim two years ago, and now the magazine is defunct? It struck me as kinda funny. And I say this with only love and respect for my friends at DRUM! Magazine...

I worked for Simmons from 1985-1986, at the time when Dave Simmons predicted the end of acoustic drums within a few years... And I owned an SDSV and later an SDS7. I love everything about acoustic drums and can't imagine playing electronic drums again. It's like drinking warm beer through a straw...
Try the latest Yamaha, Pearl, ATV top end kits.

They might suprise you after you experiences with the SD kits.

They have come such a long way, they are usefull on stage these days.

Especially as hybrid kits
 

Drum Gear Review

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Does anyone else see the irony in DRUM! Magazine making this claim two years ago, and now the magazine is defunct? It struck me as kinda funny. And I say this with only love and respect for my friends at DRUM! Magazine...

I worked for Simmons from 1985-1986, at the time when Dave Simmons predicted the end of acoustic drums within a few years... And I owned an SDSV and later an SDS7. I love everything about acoustic drums and can't imagine playing electronic drums again. It's like drinking warm beer through a straw...

Isn't it funny that people lost their jobs? Hahaha

Did you actually read the article or just VBs post?
 

John DeChristopher

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Isn't it funny that people lost their jobs? Hahaha

Did you actually read the article or just VBs post?
Um, no it's not funny. Anyone who knows me (and even if you don't) knows I'm not making light of anyone losing their job. I know the people at DRUM! Magazine and my attempt at humor and sarcasm was not aimed at them. I was pointing out the irony, and using my own personal experience working for Simmons during the heyday of electronic drums. I thought that was clear, but maybe not, so hopefully that clarifies it.

I didn't actually read the article - just VB's post. My comment was based on the title:

DRUM Magazine Reveals Acoustic-Only Drummers are Piloting a Horse-and-Buggy in the Jet Age​

 

RockrGrl

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Yah but in the late 70's they said that the drummer as a musician and that drumkits would be extinct because the electronic stuff was getting really sophisticated. Now we face a different challenge but the fact is that i know lots of studio engineers that will take a good sounding acoustic kit over any hi-end electronics. As for live situations, if i walk into a venue and see a Rolland on the stage, i have to admit that i am disapointed every time.
If you don't see the brain, and you're not up close, how can you tell its a Roland?
 

RockrGrl

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It would also have different requirements depending on whether you are miking the acoustic drums or not. If you have a big enough PA with the available channels and are miking then you can run everything through the PA but if you don't then you would need amps next to the drum kit so the sampled sounds sound like they are coming from the drum kit. Hybrid definitely adds a lot of complexity and extra equipment requirements above and beyond the electroncs themselves.
Most hybrid/e-kit players don't take an amp, unless they're using it for a monitor. Drums go FOH, just like when you mic them.
 

Whitten

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Bottom line - in the modern age it really helps if you understand computers and music software.
The last few years I have heavily utilised a Roland SPD-SX to trigger fx, percussion, sounds from the artist's album (can be anything - synth stabs, backing vocals). Anything I can do to make the show better for the audience.
I use triggers, mostly on bass drum to change the sound for a couple of songs (big room ambience, or 808 stye low sonics).
It's fun! And makes me an MVP to the band (harder to replace).
The core of my playing is acoustic kit, but the hybrid stuff adds a lot more and is FUN. I was triggering samples and loops with McCartney back in 1989.
 

Ox Han

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Nothing wrong with a hybrid kit if you need it. But, saying e-drums and hybrid kits are replacing acoustic only set ups is like saying the electric guitar will replace all acoustic guitars and acoustic players. Just ain't true. That never happened

Both have their place. Both have their dedicated fans. Both can be used together (hybrid) and both can be fun.
 

kallen49

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I'd love to add some pads just to have hand claps and finger snaps. Those are two such heavily used sounds.
If you can find one, the Alesis Percpad, very small, so easy to add to acoustic kit, 25 sounds, robust, under $100 in 2014.
Looks current Alesis multipads are a lot more money probably with more functions.

As Whitten says, understanding computers, music software, triggering samples and loops, is a given for young players.

I would guess more kids are learning on electric kits anyway?
 


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