Drum Memorabilia Dudes Will Still Pay For

thejohnlec

Very well Known Member
Joined
Sep 14, 2017
Messages
556
Reaction score
410
Location
Ohio Valley
You don’t think SRV made a pivotal change ?
In a way, yes. What he did for his genre was noteworthy. But if you listen closely to SRV (and, for that matter, EVH) you will hear a lot of Jimi. They have both pointed to Jimi as being a major influence in the past. Hendrix cut a new path that others followed, and they admittedly stood on his shoulders. Besides, I only have enough fictional money for one Strat :)
 

Houndog

DFO Veteran
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Aug 10, 2005
Messages
2,709
Reaction score
1,867
Location
Oklahoma City
In a way, yes. What he did for his genre was noteworthy. But if you listen closely to SRV (and, for that matter, EVH) you will hear a lot of Jimi. They have both pointed to Jimi as being a major influence in the past. Hendrix cut a new path that others followed, and they admittedly stood on his shoulders. Besides, I only have enough fictional money for one Strat :)
SRV resurrected the Blues Genre .
So I think that’s quite a lot more than
“Noteworthy” it’s legendary.
 

JimmySticks

Very well Known Member
Joined
Jun 28, 2019
Messages
735
Reaction score
696
Location
Queens NY
I hear you. Back in the day (80´s) my fav stick was ProMark 707 hickory. One day I came into the drumshop to buy a brick but then they had "Simon Phillips" all over them. I stopped using them. I was young at the time but I have always had a hard time using signature gear.
Im not sure why endorsements would bother anyone.

Isn’t it a good thing for drummers to be sponsored and make a little bit of money on his name and fame? Would you turn down a company that offered you an endorsement?
 

halldorl

DFO Veteran
Joined
Jan 16, 2011
Messages
2,651
Reaction score
2,217
Location
Iceland
Im not sure why endorsements would bother anyone.

Isn’t it a good thing for drummers to be sponsored and make a little bit of money on his name and fame? Would you turn down a company that offered you an endorsement?
I was a young arrogant punk rocker with an attitude at the time :cool:
Endorsements don’t bother me at all although I prefer gear with no artist names on them.

And yes, I would and have turned down a company offering me an endorsement because I didn’t like their product.
 

JimmySticks

Very well Known Member
Joined
Jun 28, 2019
Messages
735
Reaction score
696
Location
Queens NY
I was a young arrogant punk rocker with an attitude at the time :cool:
Endorsements don’t bother me at all although I prefer gear with no artist names on them.

And yes, I would and have turned down a company offering me an endorsement because I didn’t like their product.
Yeah, we were all young once! :icon_lol:

Respect for turning down the endorsement...
 

Hemant

DFO Veteran
Joined
Aug 22, 2005
Messages
1,613
Reaction score
244
Location
DC/Baltimore
About 10 years ago I bought Peter Erskine's 20" K. Heavy ride that he used on the Steely Dan "Alive in America" tour. He had consigned the cymbals and kit at Steve Maxwell's Manhattan store and I believe some of the proceeds were going to Interlochen Univeristy's music program. Maxwell's provided the provenance documentation and Peter signed the cymbal underneath. $500 and worth every penny. Heck - a brand new K ride costs nearly that much now. Besides the cool factor of using Peter's cymbal from one of my favorite bands on my own gigs, and donating to a music program, this cymbal is one of the sweetest sounding gems I have had the pleasure of laying a stick on. Hand picked from the Zildjian vault. As it was explained to me at the time, the very best "cherries" were set aside as a batch for A-list endorsers to pick through. They don't head to a local Guitar Center to tap on a stack before hitting the road. My only regret today is not purchasing the remaining cymbals in the set.
 

Attachments

Last edited:

Neal Pert

DFO Veteran
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Dec 30, 2006
Messages
2,297
Reaction score
1,692
Location
Among the Coastal Elites
See, Zildjian does it right: I think it's cool that they work with artists to get certain sounds and that those cymbals end up being marketed with the famous drummer. That's fine. But the cymbals don't get called the "Jughead Jones Crystal Crash" or whatever.
 

JimmySticks

Very well Known Member
Joined
Jun 28, 2019
Messages
735
Reaction score
696
Location
Queens NY
About 10 years ago I bought Peter Erskine's 20" K. Heavy ride that he used on the Steely Dan "Alive in America" tour. He had consigned the cymbals and kit at Steve Maxwell's Manhattan store and I believe some of the proceeds were going to Interlochen Univeristy's music program. Maxwell's provided the provenance documentation and Peter signed the cymbal underneath. $500 and worth every penny. Heck - a brand new K ride costs nearly that much now. Besides the cool factor of using Peter's cymbal from one of my favorite bands on my own gigs, and donating to a music program, this cymbal is one of the sweetest sounding gems I have had the pleasure of laying a stick on. Hand picked from the Zildjian vault. As it was explained to me at the time, the very best "cherries" were set aside as a batch for A-list endorsers to pick through. They don't head to a local Guitar Center to tap on a stack before hitting the road. My only regret today is not purchasing the remaining cymbals in the set.
I totally get why you bought that cymbal! Its very cool, it’s one of your hero’s, you didn’t pay through the nose for it and some of it went to charity. Good deal IMHO...
 

Corbin L Douthitt

Well-Known Member
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Dec 21, 2018
Messages
59
Reaction score
28
Location
Texas
Yesterday on Reverb I found one of my favorite drummers' Reverb shop, and it's filled with a bunch of his old gear to which he's attached some VERY premium prices (e.g. a snare used for a track on his band's second album is listed at $20,000). It made me consider two things: (1) There's almost NOTHING I'd pay a big premium for just because it once belonged to one of my favorite drummers, and (2) some dudes WILL pay a premium for stuff owned by their favorite drummers.

A drummer friend and I were trying to come up with a list of drummers who could get huge premiums (let's say at least 200% of its normal market value) on gear just because they'd owned something. We didn't come up with very many.

1. Neil Peart
2. Tony Williams
3. Ringo
4. Charlie Watts
5. Maybe still Buddy?
6. Even less likely: Gene Krupa?
7. Dave Grohl
8. Phil Collins?

So, I guess my question for you goobs is twofold:

1. Which drummers do you think have a realistic chance of their stuff selling quickly as memorabilia for a premium price (say, 200% of normal market value)? For example, would the market support an easy sale of Steve Gadd's acrolite for $500 if there was an identical acrolite available for $250?

2. Is there a piece of drum gear that YOU personally would reach deep into your pocket for if your favorite drummer was selling it?

I've already given you my answer for #1. For #2: When Jack DeJohnette's Sonor HiLite kit was for sale last year-- if I were a lot richer and had a lot of cash on hand and didn't have pretty big college bills and other stuff, that might've been a serious temptation even at $25K and at Maxwell's. But probably not. But much of the music that I listened to in my young adulthood and early middle age was made on that drum kit, so I'd at least think about it. Then again, would there be ANY market for it when I stop playing as an old man? Probably not.
I would add Hal Blaine to that list.. Jack DeJhonnette- Papa Joe, but I would only be interested in their cymbals..
 

Deafmoon

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 26, 2014
Messages
131
Reaction score
83
Location
New York
Can you be so kind as to tell me what would be of value from Dave Grohl? No offense here, but you listed Gene, Buddy, Tony, Phil, Ringo, Charlie & Neil and I can agree for the most part. But has Grohl paid the dues these guys did that he should be so revered? Granted he can write songs, but Tony Williams wrote better than every drummer mentioned. I will listen though to your point of view. Peace.
 

JimmySticks

Very well Known Member
Joined
Jun 28, 2019
Messages
735
Reaction score
696
Location
Queens NY
JimmySticks:
I am a fan of Ed S.
Im sure there’s a couple of us out there, but Ed doesn’t really get his due in the jazz world, does he. Maybe all those years on the Johnny Carson Show made people forget his incredible skills and he is rarely brought up when jazz drumming is mentioned. His book was great, Lucky Drummer.
 

old_K_ride

DFO Master
Joined
Aug 6, 2005
Messages
4,777
Reaction score
297
Location
Cincinnati,OH U.S.A.
About 10 years ago I bought Peter Erskine's 20" K. Heavy ride that he used on the Steely Dan "Alive in America" tour. He had consigned the cymbals and kit at Steve Maxwell's Manhattan store and I believe some of the proceeds were going to Interlochen Univeristy's music program. Maxwell's provided the provenance documentation and Peter signed the cymbal underneath. $500 and worth every penny. Heck - a brand new K ride costs nearly that much now. Besides the cool factor of using Peter's cymbal from one of my favorite bands on my own gigs, and donating to a music program, this cymbal is one of the sweetest sounding gems I have had the pleasure of laying a stick on. Hand picked from the Zildjian vault. As it was explained to me at the time, the very best "cherries" were set aside as a batch for A-list endorsers to pick through. They don't head to a local Guitar Center to tap on a stack before hitting the road. My only regret today is not purchasing the remaining cymbals in the set.
Peter unloaded a slew of cymbals recently via Pro Drumshop of Hollywood to spearhead a scholarship named for a gifted USC student of his who was killed in a robbery.
I nabbed the 21" K Custom Special Dry Ride he demonstrated on his YouTube channel.Like yours,it was signed by him and had P.E. under the bell.
A bargain @ $250...what a cymbal.
 

Hemant

DFO Veteran
Joined
Aug 22, 2005
Messages
1,613
Reaction score
244
Location
DC/Baltimore
Peter unloaded a slew of cymbals recently via Pro Drumshop of Hollywood to spearhead a scholarship named for a gifted USC student of his who was killed in a robbery.
I nabbed the 21" K Custom Special Dry Ride he demonstrated on his YouTube channel.Like yours,it was signed by him and had P.E. under the bell.
A bargain @ $250...what a cymbal.
Nice score OKR!
 

Deafmoon

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 26, 2014
Messages
131
Reaction score
83
Location
New York
I'm out of the collecting stage of life, but based on experiences good and not-so-good, if I was going to invest in a legacy kit I would trust and buy from Steve Maxwell. Only. Period. I don't mean to sound nasty, truly, but there is another dealer on the West Coast whose legacy-owned-by kits always seem to start at $29,995. Or $39,995. Consistently. And I had a bad experience at that dealer with a supposedly all-original Geo. Way snare that turned out to have DW parts. Just saying, it's more than the kit and the price tag. I don't think I recall any legacy kit at Maxwells (OK, you guys will tell me the exception I forgot) that went for such extravagant asking prices.
And did you ever notice that guy on the West Coast will ask his $39k and then through on a shipping charge to boot? That’s not a businessman, that’s an idiot.
 

Deafmoon

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 26, 2014
Messages
131
Reaction score
83
Location
New York
I remember a story of someone bugging Tony Williams at a clinic one time to tell them the stick length size, model, diameter stick he used and Tony just said, ‘Why do you need to know that? Do you think even with my sticks you’re gonna play like me?’ That says it all to me about owning someone else’s stuff. Nice, but not necessary.
 

georgelawrence

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 20, 2006
Messages
63
Reaction score
13
Location
Memphis Tennessee
Yesterday on Reverb I found one of my favorite drummers' Reverb shop, and it's filled with a bunch of his old gear to which he's attached some VERY premium prices (e.g. a snare used for a track on his band's second album is listed at $20,000). It made me consider two things: (1) There's almost NOTHING I'd pay a big premium for just because it once belonged to one of my favorite drummers, and (2) some dudes WILL pay a premium for stuff owned by their favorite drummers.

A drummer friend and I were trying to come up with a list of drummers who could get huge premiums (let's say at least 200% of its normal market value) on gear just because they'd owned something. We didn't come up with very many.

1. Neil Peart
2. Tony Williams
3. Ringo
4. Charlie Watts
5. Maybe still Buddy?
6. Even less likely: Gene Krupa?
7. Dave Grohl
8. Phil Collins?

So, I guess my question for you goobs is twofold:

1. Which drummers do you think have a realistic chance of their stuff selling quickly as memorabilia for a premium price (say, 200% of normal market value)? For example, would the market support an easy sale of Steve Gadd's acrolite for $500 if there was an identical acrolite available for $250?

2. Is there a piece of drum gear that YOU personally would reach deep into your pocket for if your favorite drummer was selling it?

I've already given you my answer for #1. For #2: When Jack DeJohnette's Sonor HiLite kit was for sale last year-- if I were a lot richer and had a lot of cash on hand and didn't have pretty big college bills and other stuff, that might've been a serious temptation even at $25K and at Maxwell's. But probably not. But much of the music that I listened to in my young adulthood and early middle age was made on that drum kit, so I'd at least think about it. Then again, would there be ANY market for it when I stop playing as an old man? Probably not.
 

Latest posts



Top