Drum room with concrete floor/ garage

Falling Buffalo

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First post for me on this forum. My wife and I have had family staying with us permanently and I have had to move my drum room into my garage to accommodate. After some cleaning and organization the space is now much bigger than my previous room. I layed some rugs and carpet rems on the floor and put up some sound treatment panels around the room. The overhead door was cold and loud so I hung moving blankets and some acoustic panels on it. The room sounds good now but the problem is my kick drum in this space has become a total black hole (Legacy 16x20). Very little tone is projecting. Very little volume. It’s just dead in here! The Toms and snare sound amazing. I’m guessing it’s the concrete floor though I don’t understand why. My other practice/recording space is in another Garage with similar conditions and the kit in that space sounds fine (Saturn 18x22).
I'm looking at options to separate the kit from the floor by mats or a riser but I am hoping that there are some of you with experience in this situation. My goal is to start recording in here and am acquiring gear currently. The drums sounded so good in the other room, it would be a shame if I can’t get this room to work. Thanks in advance for any advice..
 

JDA

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overhead door
?whats an overhead door look like. Oh overhead Garage door. I got two of em.
but the problem is my kick drum in this space has become a total black hole (Legacy 16x20). Very little tone is projecting. Very little volume. It’s just dead in here!
Ported head?
experience in this situation.
all I ever use is the attached garage you get used to it- you won't wanna go back in the house


https://soundcloud.com/jda56%2Ftadaygarg
 
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snappy

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Welcome.
Have someone hit the bass drum while you stand out front and begin adjusting after that.
 

owr

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Try it out without floor carpets, or just minimal (single carpet). Could be sucking up to much, concrete floors are actually supposed to be quite good for acoustics, provided the rest of the room is treated well.
 

Falling Buffalo

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It may just be that the smaller room boosted the kicks tones and the garage doesn’t provide that. Hopefully once I get a mic in it it still has body.
 

tris66

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It may just be that the smaller room boosted the kicks tones and the garage doesn’t provide that. Hopefully once I get a mic in it it still has body.
I'd agree with you. Low frequencies are bigger waves and take more energy. Your bigger room and treatments are sucking up that energy. It might work very well in your favor when you start recording. People pay a lot of money for traps to control bass in rooms. Most styles these days want a short bass note. Booooom, booooooom sounds cool behind the kit or in the room, but that resonating note kills headroom on your recording.
 

Pibroch

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If the only listening you’ve done is from behind the drum set while you’re playing it, my guess is that you‘ve been seated in null positions either too close or too far from the wall behind you.

What experimenting have you done so far with rear wall distance?

Regarding recording, this informal experiment supported the notion that the room will have very little influence on recorded sound quality of close miked sounds: https://www.soundonsound.com/techniques/recording-drums-what-difference-does-room-make
 
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CherryClassic

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I'm no expert; if you have mufflers in the bass remove some of it or try a more open tuning may help. If you are tuning really low tighten to heads a little for tone; try the reso head first.

sherm
 

Johnny K

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If the only listening you’ve done is from behind the drum set while you’re playing it, my guess is that you‘ve been seated in null positions either too close or too far from the wall behind you.

What experimenting have you done so far with rear wall distance?

Regarding recording, this informal experiment supported the notion that the room will have very little influence on recorded sound quality of close miked sounds: https://www.soundonsound.com/techniques/recording-drums-what-difference-does-room-make
Good read.

...instrumental funk band inspired by Italian B-movie soundtracks of the 1960s and ‘70s.

I could get down with this.
 

scaramanga

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Yes move the kit around until you find a spot. I'm in a small space and if I orient N/S instead of E/W in here I lose my bass drum.
 


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