Drum Set in a corner?

Rmgreg

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I'm finalizing plans for my drum shed discussed in another thread. Thr footprint will be 20'x20' under roof with 4x20 being a covered porch. Approximately 4x16 storage area with barn doors at one end with a 8x16' sleeping loft over that. This leaves 16x16 of open space for a music area and a couch and chair. To get the wife to buy in, this space has to double as additional family sleeping sleeping space. I'm thinking a 6/12 - 9/12 pitch roof with the gables on the ends (not the porch side). Since the drums will be across from the loft there will be a 13-14ft peaked ceiling above the drums. The walls will be solid 4" D logs. I've included a sketch and a pic of the general "look" we are going for. The porch is on the front and storage on right in sketch.

My main question is about drum set placement. Functionally I would love it to be in one of the corners across from the storage area facing out., but I'm wondering if it would be better in the center of the wall directly under the roof peak? We will use acoustic panels and furniture strategically as needed for acoustics. The roof will be insulated and walls solid 4" wood. Probably carpeted floors or lots of Oriental rugs.

Thoughts? Suggestions?
 

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bob

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try the corner , then try the middle of the room .... your set will sound different were ever you set them up
in my room i can move a set over 5 ft. and it will sound different .... just play around , you'll find the right spot


and if you don't .... tell your wife you need to buy a new drum set ..... that should work
 

phdamage

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do you have any concerns about sound proofing/isolation or recording acoustics or just wondering where it will sound/feel best to play?

if it's just about sound/feel while playing, i'd just set it up different places and see what you like. lots of variables can really influence that, furniture/stuff in the room. i would start in the corner - more volume, boosted low end. if the room is mostly hard surfaces, you may want to DIY some fiberglass panels and/or some diffusors if the flutter echoes are really out of control
 

Rmgreg

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do you have any concerns about sound proofing/isolation or recording acoustics or just wondering where it will sound/feel best to play?

if it's just about sound/feel while playing, i'd just set it up different places and see what you like. lots of variables can really influence that, furniture/stuff in the room. i would start in the corner - more volume, boosted low end. if the room is mostly hard surfaces, you may want to DIY some fiberglass panels and/or some diffusors if the flutter echoes are really out of control
I'm not too worried about sound proofing. We are up in the mountains on acreage. I am planning to make some rock wool acoustic panels as needed and strategically place furniture and decor for acoustics.

I am getting a Tama Superstar Classic Maple 5 piece kit with Zildjian K cymbal pack. It will take a bit to build the cabin and I like to marinate on layout, design etc. I figured many here could stop me from wasting time on common mistakes.
 

jptrickster

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Do think there will be an issue putting the set in the corner?
I suppose the upper left corner would work, couch in front of the storage area on right, tv on opposing left hand wall as you walk in. Maybe access storage area from exterior gable end wall.
 

Rmgreg

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I suppose the upper left corner would work, couch in front of the storage area on right, tv on opposing left hand wall as you walk in. Maybe access storage area from exterior gable end wall.
I'm planning on sliding barn doors for the storage area. 4 ft of wall each side and 4ft doors so you can open to 8 ft. I thought about exterior access too but that's just more expense and more areas for cold air to get in.
 

CherryClassic

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As per my experience: NORMALLY, LOL When we played on a tiny stage with carpet in a small restaurant, I would cramp my self in a corner with the base amp to my left in front of the Hi-hat stand. My floor tom in the corner, sounding OK and rack toms flying over the bass. One night the bass player was out of town and we decided to just do a trio. That night I moved my drums out a little and facing more to center stage. WoW!! The floor tom came alive. After that the bass player and I found a better solution and it really worked out better for the both us us.

I ended up side stepping between the wall and floor tom to get behind the set rather climbing/tripping over Hi-Hat legs. I'm still in the corner but had to leave air space around the floor tom.

You need to know the actual space needed of a fully setup drum set then add a lot more space around it. I have a practice area in a game room for a large 7 piece kit. It sets on a carpet 5x8' about 6" from the back wall. The second floor tom is 22" from the right wall and 15" from the back wall. I also have a small 6 drawer wood cabinet I found on YouTube directly in the corner to keep what ever needed, drum parts, tuning keys and tools. And you may need a roller type table with electronic equipment that may be needed on the opposite side. My drums face across to the opposite wall of the room due to other game room items, you may rather face to center room.

sherm

PS: My game room is 20x20.
 

Rmgreg

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As per my experience: NORMALLY, LOL When we played on a tiny stage with carpet in a small restaurant, I would cramp my self in a corner with the base amp to my left in front of the Hi-hat stand. My floor tom in the corner, sounding OK and rack toms flying over the bass. One night the bass player was out of town and we decided to just do a trio. That night I moved my drums out a little and facing more to center stage. WoW!! The floor tom came alive. After that the bass player and I found a better solution and it really worked out better for the both us us.

I ended up side stepping between the wall and floor tom to get behind the set rather climbing/tripping over Hi-Hat legs. I'm still in the corner but had to leave air space around the floor tom.

You need to know the actual space needed of a fully setup drum set then add a lot more space around it. I have a practice area in a game room for a large 7 piece kit. It sets on a carpet 5x8' about 6" from the back wall. The second floor tom is 22" from the right wall and 15" from the back wall. I also have a small 6 drawer wood cabinet I found on YouTube directly in the corner to keep what ever needed, drum parts, tuning keys and tools. And you may need a roller type table with electronic equipment that may be needed on the opposite side. My drums face across to the opposite wall of the room due to other game room items, you may rather face to center room.

sherm

PS: My game room is 20x20.
I'm picturing mine here
 

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Seb77

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if it's just about sound/feel while playing, i'd just set it up different places and see what you like. lots of variables can really influence that, furniture/stuff in the room. i would start in the corner - more volume, boosted low end. if the room is mostly hard surfaces, you may want to DIY some fiberglass panels and/or some diffusors if the flutter echoes are really out of control
I was going to post somtheing similar. In a corner, the low frequencies are stronger, and if the walls are smooth/hard, you get a lot of early refelctions, which means the highs are also quite loud for yourself.
I didn't follow the project; in gerenal a bit of air around the drums and a higher ceiling is usually better for the sound.
 

dcrigger

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My main question is about drum set placement. Functionally I would love it to be in one of the corners across from the storage area facing out., but I'm wondering if it would be better in the center of the wall directly under the roof peak? We will use acoustic panels and furniture strategically as needed for acoustics. The roof will be insulated and walls solid 4" wood. Probably carpeted floors or lots of Oriental rugs.

Thoughts? Suggestions?
While I agree with everyone that said there's nothing like hearing it to find out. But to venture a guess...

I would think being directly under that peak could be a liability - in much the same ways the corners are. It wouldn't even have an advantage re: symmetry - as the peak doesn't seem like it would be in the middle of the room.

So to me - I'm with you - in leaning towards either of those corners on the left side of your drawing (opposite those barn doors). I can't recall if you're just talking rehearsal or recording as well. But if recording - you could easily focus a bunch of sound treatment in that corner to help your drum sound immensely.

I record facing into a corner of my 11x15.5 ft room and it has been working great. I built a fiberglass/rockwool bass trap into that corner (actually all three of the corners) - so the bass drum faces that (right now, about 30" back) trap and there are three 2x4 ft 4" panels on each of the corners side walls (4 of those panels are also partially reflective (diffusing).

All of that and the drums and the mics fit into a basically 7.5 x 7.5 square - and if you face the other way, it could be even less. I only record in this space - so much prefer not having to walk around and avoid bumping into mic stands, nor constantly having to crawl back into the corner. But the acoustics of it works both ways - and you (or I) could easily flip back and forth depending on what we're doing.

Two other thoughts - if you're going to record - try and avoid install wall to wall carpet - getting wall to wall carpet out of my room was a huge improvement. I have a 6 x 6 carpet/rug under the drums - but not having that whole surface blanketed by carpet has really helped the drums, the speakers, everything sound better.

Second thought - I get a sense you are thinking a that a dash of rockwool and a couch and some bookshelves are going to be sufficient - and yes, they might. But it is highly unlikely. Particularly with that vaulted ceiling (drywall, I assume). I mean, there's nothing to be done until the interior is closed in - I would just prepare in your mind that you might end up wanting/needing a boatload of acoustic panels to make the room comfortable to play in - let alone record in.

But compared to the scope of the whole project - making, covering and placing a bunch of panels is a pretty minor deal.

Anyway - good luck with your build - it looks exciting!!
 


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