Drum Shed

Drm1979

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So I've been thinking about getting a shed and putting it in my back yard for the sole purpose of keeping my drums in it to practice and store. I dont have room to keep them set up in my house. My concern is that I live in northwest florida so heat and humidity are my 2 main enemies. My drums aren't a high end, expensive or rare kit. I have more of an emotional attachment to them then a dollar value attachment. What would any of you reccomend on how to protect them from the elements while being stored, or is this a bad idea all together? Also any recommendations of what kind of shed to get/build?
 

drumnhands

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You shouldn't have a problem. I did the same thing in my back yard. I bought a shed kit from Home Depot, the one with the loft for storage. Do this, you'll be glad you did. A few tips. Pour a level concrete pad to put the shed on, seal it around the bottom inside and out to keep rain from seeping in. Take care to make sure everything is plumb and level, that will make finishing it much easier. Make sure you have a roof vent, the one that spins and circulates the air. Insulate the walls and ceiling and sheetrock the entire interior, put sound board between the studs and sheetrock. That will help with keeping too much sound escaping, extending the hours you can play. Put in a small window(dual pane) for additional ventilation when needed.
 

Elvis

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Run electrical line into the place so you can have a light (4' shop light with no hood and paint the ceiling white. Works wonders) and a place to plug in (because eventually, someone wil wanna come over and jam).
Could be as simple as a heavy duty extension cord that plugs into a power strip.
Electricity will allow you power for music to play along with, but more important, now you can plug in a dehumidifier, to help keep the place dry (as long as you keep the doors and windows shut).
Something with a drain hose (instead of a pan), would probably work best for you.

Elvis
 

Tornado

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What about neighbors? Will sound be a problem? Most sheds will leak much more sound than a house.
 

cashmanbashman

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Get one with a window so you can put a window mount air conditioner in it. Your drums and your body will thank you.
 

swarfrat

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Yeah, I was going to say a window unit - even if it's set to something like 85F, it will keep it from hitting the crazy high temps.
 

cworrick

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I agree with the window a/c unit, however, remember that any openings you put in the walls is a place for sound to escape.

Best thing I put in my shed was a large mirror. This helps the inside appear larger than it is so you don't feel so cramped inside.
 

Drm1979

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Neighbors aren't really an issue. Our noise ordinance doesn't start until 10pm and the lot next to me is empty. The other side is an apartment complex. However I need this to be cost effective. Unfortunately I wont have but maybe 3-500 to invest in something like this. I was really just thinking of a 6x8 foot shed. And building an elevated wood floor to anchor it to. Then getting cases to keep them in when not being played. Oh and building a shelf to put them on so that they dont sit on the floor when I'm not playing. It's just a small 4piece kit so a 6x8 should be enough room to accommodate the kits footprint.
 

Targalx

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Yeah, I was thinking about doing the same (I have just the right amount of space on my side yard for a 6x8 shed), but ultimately bought an electronic kit instead. As much as I would love to bash a real kit anytime I wanted, it just was too much to do.
 

blueshadow

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Yeah, I was thinking about doing the same (I have just the right amount of space on my side yard for a 6x8 shed), but ultimately bought an electronic kit instead. As much as I would love to bash a real kit anytime I wanted, it just was too much to do.
Yep this is why I have an electronic kit in the study of my home... earphones, run mp3's to play along to, everything sounds great in my ears and the rest of the house just hears a little tap, tap, tap on some rubber pads, bought the kit used for around $500....to play real drums in my neighborhood would easily be $5,000 or more
 

stuart s

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Most sheds are not safe to be in for long periods of time, they may leak fumes. Worse if you are doing anything extraneous and breathing a lot. Like joggers jogging in the streets with lots of cars/traffic.
 

Elvis

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Neighbors aren't really an issue. Our noise ordinance doesn't start until 10pm and the lot next to me is empty. The other side is an apartment complex. However I need this to be cost effective. Unfortunately I wont have but maybe 3-500 to invest in something like this. I was really just thinking of a 6x8 foot shed. And building an elevated wood floor to anchor it to. Then getting cases to keep them in when not being played. Oh and building a shelf to put them on so that they dont sit on the floor when I'm not playing. It's just a small 4piece kit so a 6x8 should be enough room to accommodate the kits footprint.
Sounds good to me, EXCEPT....

I really think you should take a little more time and add at least another couple of hundred bucks into that budget, so you can afford the AC/dehumidifier.
I think it will go a long way to stopping your drums from turning into rusty, moldy mess...not to mention making playing in that little shed a much more enjoyable affair.

...also, don't build the shed on the ground. The floor will rot in a few years and you'll be back to square one, spending a bunch of money to build a new shed.
If nothing else, at least put them up on cinder blocks of some kind. Just get that wood off the ground.

Why the need to put them in bags and up on a shelf?
Are you planning on using this shed to store garden tools, too?


Elvis
 
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Drm1979

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Sounds good to me, EXCEPT....

I really think you should take a little more time and add at least another couple of hundred bucks into that budget, so you can afford the AC/dehumidifier.
I think it will go a long way to stopping your drums from turning into rusty, moldy mess...not to mention making playing in that little shed a much more enjoyable affair.

...also, don't build the shed on the ground. The floor will rot in a few years and you'll be back to square one, spending a bunch of money to build a new shed.
If nothing else, at least put them up on cinder blocks of some kind. Just get that wood off the ground.

Why the need to put them in bags and up on a shelf?
Are you planning on using this shed to store garden tools, too?


Elvis
The shelf was just and idea to keep them a little bit more up off the ground in case of rain. I don't know. The more I think about it I'm not so sure if it's a great idea given my limited budget. Itd be one thing if my kids were grown and out of the house but then I could just turn one of their rooms into a drum room. Still got some years to go before that'll happen though.
 

amosguy

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Remember to have a good locking setup for security. Full strap across the door is the strongest, more so than just a padlock on the door.
 

Drm1979

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Yeah, I was thinking about doing the same (I have just the right amount of space on my side yard for a 6x8 shed), but ultimately bought an electronic kit instead. As much as I would love to bash a real kit anytime I wanted, it just was too much to do.
This may be what I look into instead.
 

Ptrick

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Take your time, save some money to expand your budget, and do it RIGHT. Get it big enough, on a concrete pad, and climate controlled. It will be so worth it in the end, even if it takes you longer than you like and you spend more. I’ve done it.
 

Elvis

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Yeah, I was thinking about doing the same (I have just the right amount of space on my side yard for a 6x8 shed), but ultimately bought an electronic kit instead. As much as I would love to bash a real kit anytime I wanted, it just was too much to do.
This may be what I look into instead.
That's not a bad idea either!
If you decide to explore that idea, check the cost of just setting up your drums like an e-kit (mesh heads, low volume cymbals or rubber cymbal pads, electronics).
Might be cheaper to do it that way, as opposed to a complete e-kit.

Elvis
 

PaulD

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My old set of drums was stored in an unconditioned attic space for a very long time. The shells survived remarkably well, but the hardware is pitted and rusting (where it's steel). A shed isn't going to be a lot different.
 

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