Drum Shed

Drm1979

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That's not a bad idea either!
If you decide to explore that idea, check the cost of just setting up your drums like an e-kit (mesh heads, low volume cymbals or rubber cymbal pads, electronics).
Might be cheaper to do it that way, as opposed to a complete e-kit.

Elvis
I would've already done this if I had the space in my house. That's my issue. 4 kids 4 bedroom house. No where to set up, and my oldest is autistic and he cant really handle the loudness of a full kit. Right now the only low volume practice options I have is either practice pad or rockband for my ps3 but it just doesn't feel as good as playing on a proper set up. Plus you're limited to the songs on the game and that's it.
 

PaulD

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You could rotate one kid per week to sleep in the shed and then takeover a bedroom for the drumset!. (I'm kidding!)

I was going to mention mesh heads and practice cymbals, but that only solves the noise issue, not space.

One consideration with an electronic kit is it would be easier to move for when you want to practice and when you're done.
 
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Drm1979

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I can really sympathize with your situation. One of the hardest things about playing drums is the logistics of practicing the damn things.
Yep. True words. I do get to play a few times a month with my guitarist but am still looking for a practical solution for practicing at home. I use my pad to keep my basic skill up, but when it comes to playing grooves and things of that nature then I'm kinda stuck. And tbh I would be fine with just a bass snare and hat to work with. But idk I'll keep looking for ideas.
 

TheBeachBoy

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When I built our shed for tool storage, I built a raised deck, also called a floating deck. For the posts I dug out holes, put gravel in them, laid concrete caps on them, then put pressure-treated 2x8's on top for the framing. We get irrigation for our water, so I needed a raised shed and concrete would have been really tall and much more expensive, plus I hate adding more concrete if I can avoid it.

First pic is actually the floating deck I made, but it's the same concept. With this I used a different type of block for the posts, like these. If I were to do the shed again, this is what I'd use. I also used ground anchors (like these) since we do get some pretty high winds, especially during the monsoon season.

Overall, the platform for the shed cost about $300 (this was 5 years ago so my memory on cost is a little hazy) and a couple days of work. The 8x10 shed itself was $360, but it gets hot as hell in summer. I wouldn't spend more than 5 minutes in there without a/c. So you're looking at a different shed with a window and vents, which will cost more. I'd say if you can find the room for an e-kit, that would probably be your best bet.


20160303_180420.jpg20140505_125543.jpg
 

drummerbill

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Remember to have a good locking setup for security. Full strap across the door is the strongest, more so than just a padlock on the door.
Yes, mentioning of an apartment building on one side would worry me, they will hear your drums. Would hate to read here of your drums or cymbals disappearing one night. This is one reason i have a Roland v-Kit in my home for headphone practice at all hours. Good luck.
 

Drm1979

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Yes, mentioning of an apartment building on one side would worry me, they will hear your drums. Would hate to read here of your drums or cymbals disappearing one night. This is one reason i have a Roland v-Kit in my home for headphone practice at all hours. Good luck.
 

Drm1979

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So today I helped my wife clean out her shed, she is a girl scout leader and she has a small shed in the backyard for storage. Now today's temps for northwest florida was t too bad at 65 degrees but I still sweated out a couple pounds. I have decided based on this experience of abandoning the shed idea and will be looking for another way to practice that is both cost and space effective and do it indoors.
 

michaelg

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My practice setup in my apartment , the L80's are the best thing since sliced bread and the Aquarian superpads are not too bouncy and actually retain some tone. I use a regular bass drum practice pad but added some rubber to the surface to kill the bounce.
I can get lots of work done with this kit and no neighbors have complained as yet after 4 years, I don't practice after 10pm all the same.
I've had practice pads/mutes in the past which i quickly grew tired of,, but i can honestly say i enjoy playing this current setup and its been a life saver.

I tried an ekit and personally absolutely hated the thing but they seem to work for some.

I just need to figure out how to mount my 10" superpad

practice kit.jpg
 

idrum4fun

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I installed a 10x12 Tuff Shed back in 2006, for the express purpose for my computer business. It's not your "typical" Tuff Shed, though! After the initial installation by Tuff Shed, my brother and I converted it to a real room...insulated, dry-walled, electrical, ethernet-wired to the main house and air conditioning. Summer months in southern California saw temps easily reaching 100 and over inside the shed. I keep the AC at 80 when I'm not in there. I also have a small heater for winter months. Over time, I now store many of my drums and don't have to worry about excessive heat and humidity or cold weather. Just a shed by itself would not be safe for my drums! The last picture shows the extra cement work. Not cheap, but really not bad when I compare what it cost back in 2006 vs today!

-Mark
 

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stuart s

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I installed a 10x12 Tuff Shed back in 2006, for the express purpose for my computer business. It's not your "typical" Tuff Shed, though! After the initial installation by Tuff Shed, my brother and I converted it to a real room...insulated, dry-walled, electrical, ethernet-wired to the main house and air conditioning. Summer months in southern California saw temps easily reaching 100 and over inside the shed. I keep the AC at 80 when I'm not in there. I also have a small heater for winter months. Over time, I now store many of my drums and don't have to worry about excessive heat and humidity or cold weather. Just a shed by itself would not be safe for my drums! The last picture shows the extra cement work. Not cheap, but really not bad when I compare what it cost back in 2006 vs today!

-Mark
Now thats a nice shed! Perfect for drums.
 

anthony marquart

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Neighbors aren't really an issue. Our noise ordinance doesn't start until 10pm and the lot next to me is empty. The other side is an apartment complex. However I need this to be cost effective. Unfortunately I wont have but maybe 3-500 to invest in something like this. I was really just thinking of a 6x8 foot shed. And building an elevated wood floor to anchor it to. Then getting cases to keep them in when not being played. Oh and building a shelf to put them on so that they dont sit on the floor when I'm not playing. It's just a small 4piece kit so a 6x8 should be enough room to accommodate the kits footprint.
Temperature during storage is not really a problem. What causes issues is rapid temp change. Moisture of course will cause rust.
 

drummerjohn333

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Ladies and Gentlemen,
This is a silver lining to living in Michigan - where most houses have BASEMENTS. Most of you with this problem live where basements are not common. Yes, they have to be DRY basements (no leaks) - but keeping the humidity level is easy and coolness in the summer is naturally easy and heat in the winter is not that hard (space heaters cost an average of 11 cents per hour) and it gets a head start of naturally being at 58ish without any intervention.
I am shopping for a house right now - and a basement is a must. Seen some houses where the builder/owner elected to go with a 4ft craw space - what a huge foolish waste of space.
 

Tornado

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Ladies and Gentlemen,
This is a silver lining to living in Michigan - where most houses have BASEMENTS. Most of you with this problem live where basements are not common. Yes, they have to be DRY basements (no leaks) - but keeping the humidity level is easy and coolness in the summer is naturally easy and heat in the winter is not that hard (space heaters cost an average of 11 cents per hour) and it gets a head start of naturally being at 58ish without any intervention.
I am shopping for a house right now - and a basement is a must. Seen some houses where the builder/owner elected to go with a 4ft craw space - what a huge foolish waste of space.
I wish basements were a thing in Texas.
 

Elvis

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I would've already done this if I had the space in my house. That's my issue. 4 kids 4 bedroom house. No where to set up, and my oldest is autistic and he cant really handle the loudness of a full kit. Right now the only low volume practice options I have is either practice pad or rockband for my ps3 but it just doesn't feel as good as playing on a proper set up. Plus you're limited to the songs on the game and that's it.
What if you simply replaced the heads on your drums with Remo Silent Stroke (mesh) heads and use the low volume cymbals that Ziljdian makes (or the Sound Off cymbal pads)?
...maybe you could play in your own bedroom?
 

Elvis

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Ladies and Gentlemen,
This is a silver lining to living in Michigan - where most houses have BASEMENTS. Most of you with this problem live where basements are not common. Yes, they have to be DRY basements (no leaks) - but keeping the humidity level is easy and coolness in the summer is naturally easy and heat in the winter is not that hard (space heaters cost an average of 11 cents per hour) and it gets a head start of naturally being at 58ish without any intervention.
I am shopping for a house right now - and a basement is a must. Seen some houses where the builder/owner elected to go with a 4ft craw space - what a huge foolish waste of space.
I'm right there with you.
I've lived in a few places that were either sunk in the ground or had basements.
Probably the best way to go for drum storage/usage.
4 ft. underground keeps temps and humidity at a really nice level, year-round.
If I ever get the chance to build my own house, I might just shove that little puppy into a hillside.

Elvis
 

PaulD

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Luckily I have a basement also and luckily, it's pretty dry down there. There's another thread about building a DIY drum riser for those with drums in the basement and it's a good idea. Even the driest basements can flood if gutters aren't kept clean, water heater bursts, etc. Also, IME, most basements need a dehumidifier in the summer but those are pretty cheap. I have mine plumbed into the condensate pump for my furnace.

Anyway, back to the OP, to me it sounds like you should keep an eye on eye out for a used electronic kit with mesh heads. It seems like you have both a storage and volume problem and that mitigates both. Good luck.

I stopped playing for 25 years and this exact problem is mostly why. Luckily there are a lot more solutions now vs 25 years ago.
 
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Drm1979

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What if you simply replaced the heads on your drums with Remo Silent Stroke (mesh) heads and use the low volume cymbals that Ziljdian makes (or the Sound Off cymbal pads)?
...maybe you could play in your own bedroom?
Again it's the space issue too. With a king size bed and the dresser we have theres just not enough room. I'm casually looking at the Ekit idea. Then I could just pull them out in the living room to practice and when I'm done pack em back up in my closet.
 

Elvis

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Luckily I have a basement also and luckily, it's pretty dry down there. There's another thread about building a DIY drum riser for those with drums in the basement and it's a good idea. Even the driest basements can flood if gutters aren't kept clean, water heater bursts, etc. Also, IME, most basements need a dehumidifier in the summer but those are pretty cheap. I have mine plumbed into the condensate pump for my furnace.

Anyway, back to the OP, to me it sounds like you should keep an eye on eye out for a used electronic kit with mesh heads. It seems like you have both a storage and volume problem and that mitigates both. Good luck.

I stopped playing for 25 years and this exact problem is mostly why. Luckily there are a lot more solutions now vs 25 years ago.
Granted, everyone's situation is different, but I've had one set or another stored in the basement of my parents house for almost 40 years now and have never had issues with dampness.
The floor is covered in indoor/outdoor carpeting (or whatever they call it these days), and the room is next to the furnace, which has a duct that leads into the room.
I'm sure those help.


Elvis
 


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