Drum Shed

Targalx

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No basements in most Southern California homes. If there's an earthquake, your home would fall right into the basement! The only homes I know of that have basements in this area are 100+ years old.
 

Joe61

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No basements in most Southern California homes. If there's an earthquake, your home would fall right into the basement! The only homes I know of that have basements in this area are 100+ years old.
Just curious...are earth quakes the reason basements are scarce in So Cal??
 

Targalx

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Just curious...are earth quakes the reason basements are scarce in So Cal??
I believe so, but I'm no engineer, so I can't say for sure. I'm guessing that homes need to be built on a structurally-sound slab foundation to help them stay together during an earthquake, and cutting a hole for a room underneath the house just isn't the best idea.
 

Hop

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What's cheaper to produce, a single concrete slab or a concrete slab tied into four concrete walls?
 

Tornado

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There's a lot of "explanations" out there for why some regions have basements and others don't. The simplest and most plausible to me is that regions that don't need to go deep for plumbing don't bother with the expense. And for those regions that have to go deep to keep pipes from freezing, might as well go a little deeper and have some extra usable space.
 

dboomer

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Just curious...are earth quakes the reason basements are scarce in So Cal??
I believe it is mostly about cost and necessity. Since freeze up rarely ever happen in most of SoCal there is no need for a foundation to extend below the frost line and no real need to protect pipes.
 

TheBeachBoy

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I believe it is mostly about cost and necessity. Since freeze up rarely ever happen in most of SoCal there is no need for a foundation to extend below the frost line and no real need to protect pipes.
I'd agree with the cost and necessity over it being about earthquakes. There are hardly any basements that I've seen in Phoenix and we don't get earthquakes. Maybe aftershocks, but I really doubt that would have been as big of a problem in the 50's and 60's when Phoenix started booming. I've only know one person with a full basement, although split levels were more common with homes built in the 70's and 80's.
 

PaulD

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Pretty much the biggest factor is the frost line and after that it's cost as well as how much land costs vs. the footprint of the house.

US-frost-depth-map.jpg

Basically, you have to put the foundation walls/footings below the frost line to prevent heaving in winter. In northern areas, you've excavated enough that it's not much more effort to dig out the middle. Digging out the middle means you get a basement and a place to put infrastructure like the furnace, water heater, etc as well as extra space. In areas where building the footprint larger is expensive due to land costs, that's useful. Also, you have to pour a slab anyway so that cost is the same.

There are other places, like around Denver, where they pour fairly typical concrete foundation walls, but the floor is done differently.


The floor in the basement is a lot like a the basic design of a drop ceiling. It's basically steel supporting plywood subflooring with crushed stone underneath. There are geologic factors that necessitate this and it actually makes for a pretty nice basement.

If you don't have to deal with any of this and land is relatively cheap, you just pour a slab.
 

fusseltier

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It depends on size, and where you live.
If its not more than 10 ft x 10 ft, and can regulate the heat from the sun during the day, don't bother. You'll either ruin your drums or hate it because the temperature will be unbearable. And what about jamming? You don't plan on having visitors with other instruments? You have to think about these things first.
 

TRDutch

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I don’t know
It will get awfully hot in there
I stored my Childhood Ludwigs in my dads shed while I was in college and when I told the old Dude from my local drum shop,He screamed at me to get tem the hell out of there.
I did and in his mind saved them.
 
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I live in the UK and had my yamaha 9000r setup and entered my shed that had just about enough room for the kit, seating space, a video player and tv in the 90s.

I entered the shed and exited 6 months later with dizzy spells and a little claustrophobic. I was a much better drummer but if you plan to practice in it make it bigger than you need. At least 12x10.

I boarded mine on the inside and added carpets to the wall. The kit sounded awesome which kept me playing it for 6 months all day every day.

I was working with Paul Daniels the magician at the time and I liked it. "Not A Lot", but I liked it. lol.

Do It, but bare this in mind.
 

Elvis

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Drm1979,

Have you figured out what to do about your home practice situation yet?
 

Drm1979

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Drm1979,

Have you figured out what to do about your home practice situation yet?
Not yet. Still just mainly doing pad work and then jamming with my buddy at his place a couple times a month. Still thinking about how to get to where I can play on a full set at least once a week. As i do desire to play on my kit, and miss it quite a lot.
 

CherryClassic

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Take your time, save some money to expand your budget, and do it RIGHT. Get it big enough, on a concrete pad, and climate controlled. It will be so worth it in the end, even if it takes you longer than you like and you spend more. I’ve done it.
I haven't read all the reply's but I totally agree with this.

At some time you may want to invite another band member or two to practice. Measure the full foot print of your drums, at a bare minimum I would add two to three feet all the way around just for walking room. A 6x8 may be to small. I have a 20" bass with two toms hanging over the bass plus one floor tom one snare and Hi-hat, all of that barely fits on a 5x5' pad and you'll have a cymbal or two that will hang over that area. At some point in time you'll want a table or small cabinet in the coner and some kind of electronic equipment to mess with. Once you start practicing your going to think; I wish I had a computer/lap top and head phones to play along with YouTube videos.

And yes, a small 110v air-conditioner, a dehumidifier is needed and a small heater for the winter. And you don't have to buy them all at once. If you know any other musicians, they may help you build it.

Insulate the walls add sound damping material if you wish but cover the walls with OSB ply or regular plywood inside and out, OSB is cheaper but plywood is stronger although they are building houses with OSB now days and the box store sheds are also. Wood is the best insulation you can buy. Don't use sheet rock. Paint it white on the out side and plant some small trees around it for shade. White is coolest color there is.

Save the money and do it right.

sherm
 
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Ox Han

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I’ve been looking at a shed option as well. Here are my thoughts for whatever they’re worth. .02 I guess...

1. $3-500 is way too low. If you’re building this entirely yourself, maybe you can get your materials for that, but I’d be surprised if that’s enough. Pre-fab sheds from Home Depot or builders (local to me) are in the low K’s for 10x8 and 10x12 with no interior build out including assembly.

2. The bigger the better. If you want to build the shed out for some sound proofing, you’ll lose a bit of space. Double walls and ceiling and insulation will lose about a foot on the interior of each dimension I’m told. Also, small spaces sound terrible.

You’ve probably heard drums in a small space, or recorded your drums in a bedroom. They sound horrible. The sound has terrible slap echo and the kick sounds hollow...just awful. You’ll need panels on the wall no matter what, but the bigger the space, the less panels you’ll need.

3. You should have some power in there. You’ll need some electricity for a dehumidifier and you could also install mini split for AC. Both of those things will maintain your drums.

good luck
 

Ox Han

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I was told by builders that gravel is actually better for sheds as a foundation. It’s better for weight distribution of heavy loads and would work as well for a drum cave. Since you’re in FL and I’m not, YMMV
 

dcrigger

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I would advise be careful with assuming that these Tuff-shed type structures are able to hold up the weight of fully drywalling them - particularly the ceilings. The studs and roof joists are almost always very under-sized compared to normal house construction.

Yet on the other hand - if you can't add enough mass and get them sealed up - from a sound-proofing standpoint, you might as well play drums out in the backyard in the open air - because it's not going to be much softer for your neighbors than when playing in one of those utility sheds.
 

kzac

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So I've been thinking about getting a shed and putting it in my back yard for the sole purpose of keeping my drums in it to practice and store. I dont have room to keep them set up in my house. My concern is that I live in northwest florida so heat and humidity are my 2 main enemies. My drums aren't a high end, expensive or rare kit. I have more of an emotional attachment to them then a dollar value attachment. What would any of you reccomend on how to protect them from the elements while being stored, or is this a bad idea all together? Also any recommendations of what kind of shed to get/build?
You already know, living in Florida that this will not work out unless you are willing to air condition the building. If you can’t sit in your car in the summer with the windows rolled up and the AC off, then you probably will not want to enter that sweltering hot storage building either.

Yes you can set up a building specific to contain your drums, however it will not be an inexpensive venture. You would need to insulate the building, keep it bug free, and condition the air inside the building.

There are other alternatives to having a playing kit in the house. One is to use an electronic kit with headphones, although I found switching between electronic and acoustic to be a problem mechanically for me. The other alternative is to construct a downsized acoustic kit, especially if the point is to practice. You can opt for mesh heads on your practice kit and mesh cymbals if the noise of a regular kit is unbearable to the remainder of your family. I use a scaled down kit with mesh heads for practice. It takes up little space and does not bother the neighbors nor my family members.
 

rock roll

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Neighbors aren't really an issue. Our noise ordinance doesn't start until 10pm and the lot next to me is empty. The other side is an apartment complex. However I need this to be cost effective. Unfortunately I wont have but maybe 3-500 to invest in something like this. I was really just thinking of a 6x8 foot shed. And building an elevated wood floor to anchor it to. Then getting cases to keep them in when not being played. Oh and building a shelf to put them on so that they dont sit on the floor when I'm not playing. It's just a small 4piece kit so a 6x8 should be enough room to accommodate the kits footprint.
You have been given good advice here. Don't waste money on a half ass build that will rot away. Try to do it in stages if you can , get so much done one year like the foundation and run an electrical line , then the next year build the shed. If you do use concrete blocks or wood posts to get the floor off the ground remember to put a moisture vapor shield ,which is just plastic sheeting, on the ground to keep the moisture from rising and rotting your floor.
Good luck.
 


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