Drums YOU can Identify purely by sound???

Toast Tee

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C'mon that "great Gretsch sound"!
Almost everyone I've met who have owned Gretch absolutely love em. I'm a bit afraid to play on one, and even more to buy one. I'd end up with 4 Gretch kits.
The guy I bought that Bobinga kit from yesterday was basically selling them to put his Gretch in the church.
Went off topic, but I can't tell a Gretch from a Yamaha on a recording.
 

Ptrick

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It’s pretty tough to distinguish just by ear. Too many variables with heads, tuning, touch, rooms, mic’s etc.

There are certain characteristics that I can pick out that make me go “Gretsch-ey” (dry crisp kind of knock), but nothing definitive.

Cymbals are like that too. Have seen and participated in many “find the old k” and been way off.

FEEL of the drums, and what they do when tuning or at certain dynamics I think I could pick out certain brands or types. But figure out a way to do THAT blindfolded.

I’ve read where Top professional violinists where unable to pick out a modern violin compared to a Stradivarius by ear.
 

EvEnStEvEn

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I can listen to older records and cds I played on and unless I specifically remember which snare or kit I brought to a particular session I can't always identify what I used by listening.

Just recently someone asked me what drums and snare I used on a certain album from a local artist in 2007 and I honestly couldn't recall.....even after re-listening to the tracks I couldn't state with certainty.
 

Johnny K

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C'mon that "great Gretsch sound"! ;)
I love it. And I have a set of Cat Maples and they're not made it the USA. Dont get me wrong, I love them, but after listening to the most recent episode of the Modern Drummer Podcast have me wondering if I should upgrade to a USA made Gretsch kit. The RBH Westwoods they featured sounded real good and have muddied the waters. In Gretsch's favor, they do offer more color choices in the comparable (price point) Brooklyn line.
 

FloydZKing

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Yes, on rare occasions I can indeed. When it happens it's a sound I'm intimately acquainted with and recognize, usually, it's obvious - Blaemire concert toms being a most distinctive example.
 

jptrickster

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My ears are not that good but over the years there have been a few drums that stand out and have been engraved in the memory banks.
Probably the most distinctive drums sound I've ever heard was Bonhams. Could easily pick those out in a crowd.
Elvin Jones on the Gretsch especially the 18 RB bass in a class of its own , there's Tony Williams on his Yellow Gretsch kit with the Power dot heads that
has its own distinctive voice. Charlie Watts Gretsch kit comes to mind also. So yeah we have 3 Gretsch kits right there that sound different than JB's ludwigs for sure! Michael Shrieves ludwig kit with that 5 Supra sure left a sounding impression. I think back in the day drums sounded better and more natural due to much simpler mic and recording techniques.......Almost everything has a studio enhanced sound these days very hard to tell whats what and there's so many to choose from.
 

SteveB

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On a recording? Forget about it; there are just too many obstacles in the way. That great Gretsch sound could have been a Ludwig Jazzette that was sitting there...or 50 other combinations, especially today with all the different builders out there.
 

Mongrel

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Seems most, if not all of the "yes" answers are in the context of a kit being played by a well known drummer.

Bonham on *his* Ludwigs, Elvin on *his* Gretsch kit etc.

I seem to remember a maple vs. birch thread on here awhile back. A blind test. Hit a tom-is it maple or birch?

I think that is what was in the mind of the op....

Take a 12" Rogers tom (*outside* please, no room dynamic) hold it by the rim and smack it five times. Record it with something like a Zoom H6. Repeat that with ten other brand 12" toms. No matchng tuning, no matching heads, no tune bots, just hold it and hit it.

Now listen to that recording and tell me what make it was....

If you can do that you are THE MAN....lol.
 

Mcjnic

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If you don’t match heads and tuning ... you add outside variables to the equation.
Too many variables will make any equation more difficult to solve.
 

JazzyJeff

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Unmiked, I can usually tell when someone is using Evans batter heads. Does that count?
 

Mongrel

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If you don’t match heads and tuning ... you add outside variables to the equation.
Too many variables will make any equation more difficult to solve.
Those "variables" are the point of the exercise. You don't get to have them removed to make your chances better. You don't get to know the drummer, the head, the studio, the venue, nothing. It's a drum it has a head and someone hits it. NOW tell me who made it.

If you were blind...and listening to an UNKNOWN live band or a recording of an unknown band with an unknown drummer...would you be able to emphatically say "those are GRETSCH drums" or "those are LUDWIGS" (or any other brand)? What I think usually happens is we listen to a John Bonham recording, or say a Steve Gadd recording, and we say "wow...there's that killer classic Ludwig sound". Or "there's those classic Yamaha Recording Customs". The reality is we could take any number of other kits and tune them and record them like Bonham or Gadd-and people would say it is John Bonham's kit or Steve Gadd's kit, not knowing they are really DW kits.

I would think that it would be hard enough to know what the shells were, or the specific heads, let alone who made them, in anything other than an intimate acoustic setting sitting up close.

;)
 

jptrickster

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Seems most, if not all of the "yes" answers are in the context of a kit being played by a well known drummer.

Bonham on *his* Ludwigs, Elvin on *his* Gretsch kit etc.

I seem to remember a maple vs. birch thread on here awhile back. A blind test. Hit a tom-is it maple or birch?

I think that is what was in the mind of the op....

Take a 12" Rogers tom (*outside* please, no room dynamic) hold it by the rim and smack it five times. Record it with something like a Zoom H6. Repeat that with ten other brand 12" toms. No matchng tuning, no matching heads, no tune bots, just hold it and hit it.

Now listen to that recording and tell me what make it was....

If you can do that you are THE MAN....lol.

I was simply using an artist to associate, relate and describe a well known brand of drum and its sound, not nessesarily a specific playing style or technique. I think I understood the original question. Not saying I could identify a partucular brand of drum on a stand alone basis but if you put a set of Vista's next to a set of RB's and gave me a blinfold test I would win the big prize money lol
 

Mongrel

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I was simply using an artist to associate, relate and describe a well known brand of drum and its sound, not nessesarily a specific playing style or technique. I think I understood the original question. Not saying I could identify a partucular brand of drum on a stand alone basis but if you put a set of Vista's next to a set of RB's and gave me a blinfold test I would win the big prize money lol
Not thinking of you or anyone else's posts in particular jp. :)

Since you mentioned Vistalites....

How many companies are or have produced acrylic drums?

Tama, DW, Crush, others?

Could you tell a Ludwig Vistalite from a Tama Mirage?

Lol
 

JDA

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See that's the thing. there came a time of "duplicates".
From the Yama Tama Pearl combine.

Prior. Could name brands on two hands and have 3 fingers left over.
I think those that believe they can hear differences refer back to that time.

Go back to studio version of Bargain Keith Moon on drums.
Pretty sure those (even the bass drums) tom-toms aren't Gretsch...
Softer Premier sound.

Let PearlTamaYama into the mix and the distinctions blur.
(had to be there)
during the transition)
Now today (heck 25 years ago) you have Tama making Black Beautys (etc)
and Supraphonics and wood hooped WFLs (coming) from 30 makers.
 
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Mcjnic

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Those "variables" are the point of the exercise. You don't get to have them removed to make your chances better. You don't get to know the drummer, the head, the studio, the venue, nothing. It's a drum it has a head and someone hits it. NOW tell me who made it.

If you were blind...and listening to an UNKNOWN live band or a recording of an unknown band with an unknown drummer...would you be able to emphatically say "those are GRETSCH drums" or "those are LUDWIGS" (or any other brand)? What I think usually happens is we listen to a John Bonham recording, or say a Steve Gadd recording, and we say "wow...there's that killer classic Ludwig sound". Or "there's those classic Yamaha Recording Customs". The reality is we could take any number of other kits and tune them and record them like Bonham or Gadd-and people would say it is John Bonham's kit or Steve Gadd's kit, not knowing they are really DW kits.

I would think that it would be hard enough to know what the shells were, or the specific heads, let alone who made them, in anything other than an intimate acoustic setting sitting up close.

;)

You are not identifying "drums" at that point. You are identifying the drum combination with the head choice and the chosen tension. That is three or more separate exercises.

I can skin my Luddies with an unusual head choice and tension the heck out of them ... you would be very hard pressed to identify them as Ludwig drums ... even if you were staring at me playing them.

That is the point.
There has to be a standard established in order to evaluate "sound" for the listener.

Go back to the question ... "Drums YOU can Identify purely by sound???"

With no standard, there can never be a true test for "sound".
 

Toast Tee

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As I stated earlier in this thread, I can not come close to telling what drums are being used. However, I'm pretty accurate when it comes to hearing Paiste cymbals (i know, not drums), but if I'm playing alone with a tune, that tone will match mine, even if they're different models. Not always, but I'll take my chances
 

Mongrel

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You are not identifying "drums" at that point. You are identifying the drum combination with the head choice and the chosen tension. That is three or more separate exercises.

I can skin my Luddies with an unusual head choice and tension the heck out of them ... you would be very hard pressed to identify them as Ludwig drums ... even if you were staring at me playing them.

That is the point.
There has to be a standard established in order to evaluate "sound" for the listener.

Go back to the question ... "Drums YOU can Identify purely by sound???"

With no standard, there can never be a true test for "sound".
Obviously....we are talking about two different things.

:)
 
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