Drums YOU can Identify purely by sound???

GeneZ

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C'mon that "great Gretsch sound"! ;)
When jazz drummers played acoustically? Yes.... Not so much today with miked drums. The Gretsch have a great feel that I do not find with other drums. But, when using all the modern techniques in the studio? Unless recorded acoustically? Its just fitting in with the slow moving herd (heard).
 
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SteveB

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I wouldn't make any store owner happy..that's for sure, as I believe a drum is a drum. Even when listening to an old Blakey side there was equipment involved to get it to our ears. One touch of anything mechanical and you probably changed that drum more then by switching it out for another. I feel I know the sound Joe is talking about. My way of describing it would be by a contained somewhat blunt sound, depending entirely upon how high the heads are cranked. Even the jazzers today, for the most part, don't tension up their drums to those extremes. I use Tempus and Eames kits primarily and i can mimic that sound pretty well by slightly choking the heads, especially the batter. When you get that tight you have to loosen the bottoms to bring some warmth back in. The Eames is more like Gretsch from the offset, whereas the Tempus drums are more pure and more open, both.

I personally know that I couldn't tell the difference of any lineup, whether it be snares or kits UNLESS the drum types were radically different.
 

MrDrums2112

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Drums? No. Some cymbals, however, can probably be accurately identified. For example, Paiste 2002s have a very distinct sound, or Stewart Copeland’s Paiste bell ride. Those are just the easy ones to pick out off the top of my head.
 

Maggot

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I think we should start by trying to see if we can actually identify different sizes of drum before we get all specific about identifying different brands.

I can identify materials in metal snares IF they're tuned and set up for stereotypical sounds. I can also say something like, "That sound has a Club Date vibe," but there'd only be a minimal chance that the kit would be a Club Date.

Guitars are much easier to identify sonically than drums. Each drum setup is a million times more individual than most guitar setups, but they end up sounding like drums. Cymbals and snares should be comparatively easy, but I'm still wrong at least 50% of the time. I've been playing guitar since I was 13 and I'm 51, and I can't tell a Strat or Tele from a Les Paul on a recording unless they're playing stereotypical sounds. I can tell a Strat when it's sounding like Stevie Ray Vaughan or Mark Knopfler, or a Les Paul when it's sounding like Billy Gibbons, but on a modern rock track? Forget it. Acoustic guitars? Forget it. If you play a Telecaster and then a Les Paul, they sound and feel completely different, but Jimmy Page sold a million Les Pauls based on the Telecaster sounds on the first two LZ albums. This was with the minimal processing that was available in the early 70s. It would have been even easier for Bonham to play a Sonor kit or a Slingerland and say it was Ludwigs.
 
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