Edges w/o a router?

dtk

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I did think about Precision. I think Dave Drew does edges as well...and he's driving distance. The shells were only $15 and shipping...but...I'm going to have my twin daughters do artwork on them...(blueshadow's idea)...so I'd like to make them usable....thinking of trying different edges on both (my twins are fraternal...these drums will be too!)


dtk
 
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Medium Size Dog

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All a bunch of good info here. My .02? Of course a decent router, sharp bit, stable table and serious attention is the way to go, or have it done professionally. If you want to experiment for your own amusement I suggest a thrift store to get some cheap crap drums and a bunch of sandpaper ranging from 60 to maybe 400 or 600 grit. The probably softer wood of the cheap drums is more forgiving and easier to experiment with your shaping and mistakes and will give you lots of insight without risking your good drums. MSD
 

Loud

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My pearl decade shell has a seam on the outside of the drum where the plys almost join. I think a router that uses the outside of the drum as a guide would have a crooked cut near that seam. Has anyone worked out a solution?
 

dcrigger

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I've always wondered why there wasn't an inexpensive tool made for edges.
I would think a $60 dollar Harbor Freight router mounted on a piece of 3/4" plywood as thin shell suggested might just be that inexpensive tool. :)
 

jeffh

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You can use a fingernail instead of a screwdriver but it'll be more tedious and uncomfortable, and won't do a really acceptable job of driving the screw. Get the router and make or buy a table for it. Or have the edges cut by someone in your area who's set up to do it.
 

James Walker

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Years ago, as I was easing my way into the DIY building thing, I decided to try my hand (literally) at shaping a snare drum shell's edges with a rasp/file, just out of curiosity. I figured drum builders have been doing their thing for how many centuries prior to the invention of power tools? It was (is) a Keller 10-ply shell, and one of the inner plies was visibly darker than the rest, which gave me a really nice visual reference point to keep the peak of the edge fairly well in round. (If I didn't have that visual reference, I probably never would have tried it.)

It turned out surprisingly not bad - I'd play the completed drum and think, "It has no business sounding this good" - but my God, the process was tedious.

A few years later I visited my parents, and my father told me he was getting rid of his router and table. "I'm just not doing the kind of work around the house any more, that would require this. It's yours if you want it - do you think you can you use it?"

"Yes. Yes, I can."

Long story short, eventually I recut the edges of the above-mentioned snare drum using the router table, and it sounded much better.
 


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