electronic drums - recommendations

Tomb

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Never thought I'd see the day, but with most of my gigs cancelled I'm thinking about getting a set of electronic drums so I can at least play along to music, and with a full family and pets
in the house, setting up my acoustic kit isn't going to fly. Full disclosure, I don't know the first thing about e-drums, as such I'm looking for thoughts on mesh heads vs. the Yamaha DTX style pads? And should
I splurge on a decent kit, or start with a cheapo to see if it is something that I'll actually use? I like the looks of the Alesis Strike as it seems to have reasonably sized pads, and a nice finish
but I've also heard they are not the highest quality. Yamaha I'm sure are very good. Also, how does it work so I can listen to songs on headphones but also hear my drumming as opposed to whats on the recording?
Also, I need to stay under 2K. Any thoughts? - thanks!
 

c0r1n

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I love the silicone yamaha pads, but why not put the Remo silent heads on your acoustics for now? There's a whole range of stuff for quiet at home playing these days.
 

c0r1n

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one thing people forget about electronics is that the acoustic volume, particularly on the cymbals, is not insignificant. It's just less.
 

cochlea

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I would avoid going the "cheapo" route. These kits don't usually hold up over time. I would stick with Yamaha or Roland. Be aware that Yamaha recently discontinued its mid-to-higher line DTX kits. I'm not sure if there will be any deals to be had on remaining inventory. A good way to save money is by going the used route, but I would want to be able to check out the kit in person before agreeing to buy.

Regarding your question about playing along to music, today's edrum modules all have an "Aux-In" input that allows you to connect your phone, tablet, laptop, etc. This allows you to route a recorded track through the module and play along using headphones. There are usually separate volume controls on the module to balance the level of the backing track with the sound of the edrums. It's one of the features I found most useful when I had an e-kit.
 

Tomb

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I would avoid going the "cheapo" route. These kits don't usually hold up over time. I would stick with Yamaha or Roland. Be aware that Yamaha recently discontinued its mid-to-higher line DTX kits. I'm not sure if there will be any deals to be had on remaining inventory. A good way to save money is by going the used route, but I would want to be able to check out the kit in person before agreeing to buy.

Regarding your question about playing along to music, today's edrum modules all have an "Aux-In" input that allows you to connect your phone, tablet, laptop, etc. This allows you to route a recorded track through the module and play along using headphones. There are usually separate volume controls on the module to balance the level of the backing track with the sound of the edrums. It's one of the features I found most useful when I had an e-kit.
thank you cochlea, this is very helpful
 

jaymandude

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I had the flagship DTX for a while. I thought it was great. You'll get a lot of Roland fans but for me the meshheads are terrible..
 

thin shell

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I had the flagship DTX for a while. I thought it was great. You'll get a lot of Roland fans but for me the meshheads are terrible..
I am the exact opposite. I find the mesh heads much better. They can be tensioned to give you the rebound you desire and are about as hard on your body as an acoustic drum because the "give" like a drum head. The rubber and silicone pads don't feel anything like acoustic drum when you hit them and over the long run I would be very concerned about the effects on your body because they don't "give" as much as a drum head.
 

Tomb

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I am the exact opposite. I find the mesh heads much better. They can be tensioned to give you the rebound you desire and are about as hard on your body as an acoustic drum because the "give" like a drum head. The rubber and silicone pads don't feel anything like acoustic drum when you hit them and over the long run I would be very concerned about the effects on your body because they don't "give" as much as a drum head.
TS - which heads are quieter? as in what others in the household would hear. I will have headphones on
 

c0r1n

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The silicone yamaha pads may not feel exactly like an acoustic drum, but they feel good.
Mesh doesn't feel like a real drum either. The cymbals are the thing. Roland or yamaha, for long play sessions they are rough on you. It will be harder to try yamaha before you buy, just because the good yamaha pads are not readily available, even though the rubber yamaha kits seem to be everywhere. But they are definitely worth your time.
 

c0r1n

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I see a lot of Roland TD10s for sale. Those kits are ancient but the pads are much the same. You might find a deal there.
 

NobleCooleyNut

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I owned Yamaha’s flagship DTX 950k kit for a few years and really cake to appreciate the silicon Yamaha pads . I like the feel of them far more than the mesh heads that come on the other brands . I also like the sound samples from Yamaha more than Roland .

I traded my DTX 950k to a forum member and bought a DTX 522k and swapped out the rubber pads for Yamaha Silicon pads . The Yamaha 500 series module is very easy to manage, has a great app for your iPhone and the sounds are more than adequate ( and still sound better than Yamaha IMHO).

My local shop just got in a 2Box Drummit 3 kit that is an open source sound module . The brain will work with both Roland and Yamaha pads and they have an extensive sound library . A good contender for consideration .
 

c0r1n

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Software instruments like addictive drums and superior drummer played with edrums are pretty unbelievable as well. A nice way to supercharge an outdated module, but of course, you need a pc or a mac.
 

jaymandude

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I am the exact opposite. I find the mesh heads much better. They can be tensioned to give you the rebound you desire and are about as hard on your body as an acoustic drum because the "give" like a drum head. The rubber and silicone pads don't feel anything like acoustic drum when you hit them and over the long run I would be very concerned about the effects on your body because they don't "give" as much as a drum head.
I suppose. They have a lot of fans. Just too springy for me. My sticks flew off them like I was jumping on a trampoline
 

LarryJ

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Tomb

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Rubber pads are louder than mesh headed pads, and do not feel as realistic IMHO. The springiness mentioned earlier is controllable with the head tension on mesh pads. I have a set of Rolands that I swapped out all of the rubber drum pads for mesh.

Shameless plug: my Rolands are for sale in the Drums For Sale forum.

https://www.drumforum.org/threads/roland-td-3-electronic-5-piece-drum-set-with-mesh-heads-475.175009/
Larry - I checked your post and if everything was in order I would probably buy your set tomorrow, but I'm nowhere near where you are,
and you mentioned local pick up only
 

Tomb

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Larry - I checked your post and if everything was in order I would probably buy your set tomorrow, but I'm nowhere near where you are,
and you mentioned local pick up only
sorry disregard, I see that you will ship. PM me please
 

Stickclick

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I'd get one of the Yamaha or Roland kits that sell new for about USA $ 500. Don't expect the same performance as acoustic drums. Electronic drums are different. But they have a volume control, and I like the metronome and all the different sounding drum kits. They sound really good in headphones. I played my kit at some gigs, they sound OK at restaurants and are about the same work to move as a bop kit. Plug in your cell phone and play along with YouTube songs.
 


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